2.009 Product Engineering Processes

Summary of Ideas Fair Projects

Dance Complex
Dance Happens Here!
Central Mass Search and Rescue
Backcountry Search and Rescue
Conservation of Art and Artifacts
Boston Museum of Fine Arts
Harmonix Music Systems
Harmonix Music VR
Landry's
Biking as Daily Transportation
MIT Pistol Club
Target Shooting
SuperPedestrian, Inc
Making Cities Seem Small
FormLabs
Applications for Digital Farbrication
Boston Home
Assistive Technology
United Divers
Scuba Diving Equipment
Embr Labs
The Power of Temperature
Carol Zurek
Deaf Culture 101


Dance Happens Here (video, .mp4)
Jennifer Magnuson, Peter DiMuro, Micheal Winward, Colleen Cecchi
Dance Complex

We deal with movement of all kinds for all kinds of people here at The Dance Complex. As a maturing organization, in its 25th year, we were finding that the same verve and excitement that brought thousands to our doors to move in the 90's had lost its glimmer: the word of mouth and posters that let all ages- including the student bodies of MIT, BU, Harvard and the rest- know they could find a class to move in was minimalized in effect with the use of internet as a main communication vehicle. For our 25 & Dancing On year, we decided that we need to make focused and deliberately diverse efforts to illuminate- literally! - who we are and what we do. For a landmark date midway through a year of celebration, we closed down Mass Ave, offered dance lessons on the street, performances in store windows, a 25 minute long dance created by 25 different artists and a video/light show that revealed our 5 story historic building. This last aspect, titled "Dance Happens Here" is now a calling card for all dance in the region.

Conservation of Art and Artifacts (slides)
Kay Satomi, Pamela Hatchfield
Boston Museum of Fine Arts

The conservation of art and historic artifacts includes the care and preservation of cultural heritage, from antiquities, human remains, and ancient monuments like the pyramids at Giza, to historic documents, and on to contemporary art, including time-based media (such as video), computer-based works, and performance art. The field includes both preventive conservation as well as treatment, to correct unstable conditions, in addition to aspects of restoration. It requires an understanding of the chemistry and physical nature of materials, a knowledge of how they degrade, and the environmental science required to slow the processes contributing to aging and deterioration. I will illustrate aspects of this work as it takes place in the museum as well as on excavations, and present some challenges in our work which could be met by developments in technological design.

Biking as Daily Transportation (slides)
Galen Mook
Landry's

Landry's Bicycles prides itself on being the go-to resource for all types of riders, and especially in breaking down the barriers to facilitate biking as daily transportation. To ride safely, and especially in urban settings, riders must have a few basic essential accessories; namely front/rear lights, a bicycle lock, and a helmet. However, most bicycles are designed as simply as possible and do not integrate these essentials or have dedicated places to store these accessories when not in use (i.e., there's no helmet mount on bikes, but there are bottle cage mounts). I will explain some of the legal and safety concerns addressed by a few bike accessories, and we can explore ways to better integrate these into the bicycle to make a more complete unit.

Making Cities Seem Small (slides)
Rob White
SuperPedestrian, Inc

Transportation in large urban areas is only going to get worse as cities grow in the 21st century. How can we make cities seem small as they get larger?

Assistive Technology (slides)
Don Fredette
Boston Home

At The Boston Home, assistive technology happens in an instant. In its broadest definition, AT is any device that makes a task easier for a person with a disability. The changing nature of progressive neurological disorders means that needs change frequently, sometimes daily. To rise to these challenges we have created a small maker space equipped with woodworking, metal machining, 3D printing and CNC equipment to create innovative and unique solutions (often by combining these with commercially available products) to increase access to powered mobility, computers, entertainment, and daily living/personal activities. This is often a trial and error process with design iteration being an important element as needs change and design ideas are challenged by their users. The end result is often a repeatable product or design idea which addresses the needs of individuals struggling with disability both living at the Boston Home and within the larger community. We have also collaborated with MIT’s Principles and Practices of Assistive Technology class (http://ppat.mit.edu) and MIT’s AT Hack-a-thon which have been great incubators for AT designs.

The Power of Temperature (slides)
Sam Shames
Embr Labs

EMBR labs was founded by four MIT students who are passionate about letting people take control of their own comfort. Our mission is to harness the power of temperature to improve personal comfort & save energy. We are driven by the realization that existing temperature solutions haven’t significantly evolved in the last hundred years: these solutions are passive, low-tech, & impersonal. Since our early days in 2013, we’ve been on a mission to bring next-generation personalizable wearable temperature to the world.

Backcountry Search and Rescue (slides)
Scott Harris
Central Mass Search and Rescue

Successful backcountry SAR (Search & Rescue) requires flawless execution from individual searchers, teams and planners. It involves moving many people over difficult terrain with highly choreographed movement and exact locations, in an effort to locate people or objects with maximum safety. I will discuss SAR worker persona, SAR tactics, challenges and weaknesses (technical and process related) that hamper efficient subject detection and extraction. I will focus on the most common SAR techniques used in New England, but will also discuss a range of methods.

Harmonix Music VR (slides)
Micheal Mandel, John Carter
Harmonix Music Systems

Harmonix is one of the world’s leading independent game development studios, best known for creating blockbuster franchises like Rock Band and Dance Central. The studio’s focus on creating games and interactive software that allow people to experience music in new ways has led us to embrace novel interactive hardware, from internally-designed guitar and drum peripherals to game interfaces such as Microsoft’s Kinect and the various VR headsets that have recently hit the scene. We’re here to discuss one of our recent titles, Harmonix Music VR, a music visualizer designed exclusively for Sony’s PlayStation VR headset. We’ll describe the design process we applied to the experience, based on determining how to best exploit the affordances of our hardware platform in service of our product’s creative goals.

Target Shooting (slides)
Rachel S. Yang
MIT Pistol Club

The MIT Sport Pistol Club is a group of undergraduate students who compete in Olympic-style target shooting with both CO2 powered and traditional gunpowder propelled firearms. We practice four times a week in the MIT Pistol Range, which consists of shooting at single-use paper targets at 10 and 25 meter distances. Matches are typically held twice a month with a variety of timed events, ranging from 60 shots in 2 hours to 5-shot strings in 10 seconds. The primary challenges in pistol shooting are: keeping the aim steady as you complete the shot; maintaining visual focus on the sights; and consistency in sighting, trigger pull, and grip. Some of the methods we use to improve our shooting include: dry-firing (shooting without ammunition), wrist exercises, and developing muscle memory for better techniques. Since we use firearms that are passed down within the club, we also work with our coaches and equipment managers to better tailor the pistol for ourselves, e.g. altering the grip to better fit our hand.

Applications for Digital Fabrication (slides)
Jennifer Milne
FormLabs

Formlabs develops and produces powerful and user-friendly 3D printing systems for engineers, designers and manufacturers. The company was founded in 2011 by an engineering team at MIT Media Lab and the Center for Bits and Atoms. Headquartered in Boston and offices in Germany, Japan and China, Formlabs is setting the benchmark for professional 3D printing in a variety of industries, including jewelry design, dentistry, healthcare, research and education. Formlabs products include the SLA 3D Form 2 printer, the SLS 3D printer Fuse 1, the manufacturing solution FormCell and the online marketplace for 3D designs Pinshape. Formlabs is also developing its own suite of high-performance 3D printing materials and industry-leading 3D printer software. For 2.009 Ideas Fair, Jennifer Milne, User Insights and Applications Lead will describe some key trends and applications in 3D printing, what supporting hardware customers are looking for to support new digital workflows, and where the next opportunities for mass customization will come from.

Scuba Diving Equipment (slides)
Jim Estabrook
United Divers

My presentation will be on the evolution of scuba diving equipment and water rescue equipment. in 70 years that SCUBA has been popular the equipment has had some drastic changes and has become more user friendly . The equipment has become lightweight tanks are 1/2 the weight as the original weight. The vests have become a working tool rather than something that lays around your neck. The wet suits are more flexible and warmer in the cold water here in New England. As SCUBA gear has changed so has Rescue equipment changed again to make it safer and a lot more user friendly.

Deaf Culture 101 (slides)
Carol Zurek

An overview is currently unavailable.