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Concept Refinement Reviews
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eager beavers

 System Assembly
Average Rating
 
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1-marginal     2-ok    3-good     4-very good    5-outstanding

System assembly design and storyboard comments

Client 1:

comments provided on Ana Flooks's review form
How big is the room? We're aiming to have the very smallest room be 100 sq ft, so that the rooms can comfortably fit teams of up to 6 people. The room looks a little small here.

No comments here re: telegraph.


Client 2:

comments provided on Erika Anderson's review form
I don't understand the gameplay here. After triggering the telegraph, the users have to listen to a word in Morse code, translate it, and then enter that same word back into the telegraph? If they just have to enter the code they're hearing into the telegraph, what is the point of decoding the message to put into the telephone? The user could just listen to the beeps from the alarm and tap the message out in rhythm with the alarm. There's no need to decode the message in this case. If you took the telephone out of the room, players would be able to figure out that they needed to tap a message into the telegraph, because it's the only thing they can interact with in the room. However, tapping the same message they're hearing might be boring. Would it be better for the users to have to send some other message back? That way the decoding would actually be necessary to understand what to do and to complete the puzzle.


Client 3:

comments provided on Josh Graves's review form
See comments for Ana Flooks (I accidentally commented on both the CAD work and the rendering for her).


Client 4:

comments provided on Justin Chiu's review form
Since you're going to have a flashing light, and it's a Morse Code puzzle, would it make sense for the light to flash in time with the code? If you find that players can't tell the difference between dashes and dots by audio, you may want to have visual cues as well.


Client 5:

comments provided on Niki Mossafer Rahmati's review form
The project overview and the storyboard disagree. The storyboard says the players will have to enter the code "CALL" into the telegraph, but the project overview says that the players will have to enter the code "OPEN," which they get from the man on the phone. This option makes more sense, because it seems pointless for players to decode the original message if they're just going to use the telegraph to send that same message back. Decoding the message to get a different message to send back makes more sense. However, you should verify that you and your teammates are on the same page regarding what you want the gameplay to be, because that's not what the storyboard showed.


Reviewer 6:

comments provided on Ana Flooks's review form
Looks engaging!


Reviewer 7:

comments provided on Ana Flooks's review form
I have not had experience interpreting morse code. Will it be possible without playing the morse code very slowly?


Reviewer 8:

comments provided on Ana Flooks's review form
I like how this game and the elements around the room have evolved!


Reviewer 9:

comments provided on Erika Anderson's review form
I like your images for the storyboard. They were very clear. I also like the idea of having to walk around a room and work together with friends to decode Morse Code. I personally do not think having the telephone is needed since I think it would be intuitive to tap the telegraph to spell out the code right after deciphering it. Also, if it isn't intuitive to some players, it would be part of the puzzle! I would have liked to see more detail on the CAD assembly for the telephone. Currently the design does not show the actual phone or the speakers. Also, comments on materials that will be used for the telephone, alarm, and telegraph would have been helpful! Lastly, showing information on how you plan on tackling the electronics for the three components is important, especially for the telegraph since its electronics don't seem as obvious to me.


Reviewer 10:

comments provided on Erika Anderson's review form
I like this code breaking game. This is a game that will require a lot of decorating and details to make it look authentic and it seems like your team is on your way to that point. I am a little confused by the experiences presented on your web pages. The project overview makes it seem like there will be two codes, CALL and OPEN, while the storyboard presents only one code to use in both phases of the game. Personally, I like that the version where there are two different codes better - I think it would make it more challenging - but make sure you are consistent throughout all of the content that you present.


Reviewer 11:

comments provided on Erika Anderson's review form
The overall system assembly of the room does a good job demonstrating the look of the room. An improvement can be an inclusion of a paragraph that explains the mechanism that contributes to overall room design.


Reviewer 12:

comments provided on Erika Anderson's review form
How will they know if the entered code is C-A-L-L vs. A-L-L-C, etc, since the alarm is on repeat? Does that matter? What type of phone pad is on the wall? Using my phone, the code is 2-2-5-5. Do you want it to be that simple? I think you should include a blinking light for hearing impaired guests.


Reviewer 13:

comments provided on Josh Graves's review form
Storyboard page wouldn't load for me, but the project overview makes the story progression sound very fun!


Reviewer 14:

comments provided on Josh Graves's review form
It is innovative. I am not sure how to enter 'call' in the phone.


Reviewer 15:

comments provided on Josh Graves's review form
I'm a big fan of old-timey communication, and I think this room will be especially fun for younger generations who haven't used tech like this. I think my one concern is that the room might be too straightforward and might not incorporate enough players at once. It does feela bit like a 1-person challenge, so see if you can think of clever ways with multiple phones or morse encoders to play with the challenge there!


Reviewer 16:

comments provided on Justin Chiu's review form
The game seems like it can be self-contained in a minimal amount of space. It may make for a more engaging user experience if there is more to do or experience in the room. Otherwise it is mostly empty space that seems unused.


Reviewer 17:

comments provided on Justin Chiu's review form
I think this is a very interesting room concept, but I'm not sure that a museum is the right place for it to be in. I think there may be more fitting settings for morse code?


Reviewer 18:

comments provided on Justin Chiu's review form
I like this assembly and storyboard! It's a cool experience and like the multi-sensory experience of morse code and alarm and sound and light. Nice rendering and feeling evoked from the room. I'm not sure how the telegraph and alarm interact- some sort of diagram would be helpful for understanding.


Reviewer 19:

comments provided on Justin Chiu's review form
I think that the vision presented in the storyboard would be easily implemented with regard to the simple mechanisms being used for operation.

The team didn't describe specific elements to help me understand how would the overall user experience be. The room renders lack detail to comment on the actual user experience. But, I could see the potential in the idea and would recommend the team to plan and test the gameplay to ensure that a great game is being delivered to the clients.


Reviewer 20:

comments provided on Niki Mossafer Rahmati's review form
The room looks like it will be easily assembled but the props will be crucial to create the user experience of being in a museum. Adding more detail to the picture frames, making them look like old wood intricate designs, and adding spotlights like the ones you see in art museum might help create the experience.

I think their might be some discrepancies between your storyboard and project overview so just make sure to clear that up. In the project overview there is a second code that the players have to use but only one in the storyboard.


Reviewer 21:

comments provided on Niki Mossafer Rahmati's review form
I hope that the components will not be monochromatic in implementation. A bit of color to match the theme would be nice


Reviewer 22:

comments provided on Niki Mossafer Rahmati's review form
Comments on overview:

The room is very interactive and uses key components that relate to the theme to create the challenge. The Morse code is a good idea, but it might even be better if there is also a visual Morse code for those who are hard of hearing. Perhaps the lights on the alarm can blink in the pattern of the Morse code. Also, I'm unsure about a British man answering the phone and speaking English. At Boda Borg, there were some moments when people were shouting like in "Platoon" but they were not real words. I don't think you can assume that all the guests of the Open World experience speak English fluently. Maybe when they dial CALL, the users hear footsteps approaching, and they need to figure out themselves that they need to input a code into the telegraph machine.