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Concept Refinement Reviews
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scribbles n bits

 System Assembly
Average Rating
 
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1-marginal     2-ok    3-good     4-very good    5-outstanding

System assembly design and storyboard comments

Client 1:

comments provided on Fiona Grant's review form
Your diagrams and explanations are clear and detailed. Great job! Just one question: the description in the Gag page references that the player has to attach seven loose pieces (which connect to three buildings) within three minutes. In the Room page, though, there are more than three buildings in the room (and more than seven loose pieces). Which number is correct?


Client 2:

comments provided on Thomas Mangan's review form
See comments for Fiona Grant (since both of you listed the same contributions)


Client 3:

comments provided on Yakov Berenshteyn's review form
I really like all the details you put into the storyboard - it shows how your team has made thought-out game design decisions. Will you be playtesting this at all to see if your assumptions about user behavior (such as starting with the pieces that are internally supported) are correct?


Reviewer 4:

comments provided on Fiona Grant's review form
The only concern that I have at the moment is that the one player holds the central building in its place as the pneumatic rod is going down. This will give extra time to other players to complete the task. This might cause the game to take more than 3-5 minutes. The suggestion that I have is to tune the number of rods based on the number of players.


Reviewer 5:

comments provided on Fiona Grant's review form
-You make a good comment, I think the more prominent you can make the individual identifying features of each building the better--this challenge will already be very difficult.

-I think that having one set of blocks that is the definite starting point is smart, and should be included. However, I dont think that the boring will be enough of an indicator that this is the place to start. Maybe make this a green building, and then make the ending building red, just to add a little more affordance into your game play.

-Floodlight idea is nice--will these be built into the bottom piece, or will they be built into the floor where the buildings are supposed to go?

-Is there a roadmap or grid of "city blocks" on the floor to indicate where the buildings should go?

-It would be really cool if the buildings mimicked a real city--NYC for example. You could do the empire state building, the chrysler building, maybe the statue of liberty, etc etc.

-As a side note, some of your storyboard links on different pages lead to the home page, whereas on other pages it leads to the storyboard page. Watch out for this moving forward!


Reviewer 6:

comments provided on Fiona Grant's review form
As I mentioned above, be sure to be thoughtful about how the electrical fittings are installed. They could either be concealed (which I think would be a little tougher), or other features could be added to help them blend in a little better. If they are all located in exactly the same position, for example, then there will be no extra clue given by the location of the holes. Other than that, I think this game will be a lot of fun and I am looking forward to seeing the final room! Best of luck!


Reviewer 7:

comments provided on Hans Kobor's review form
I love this concept! Especially intrigued by the spacial difficulties of a life sized puzzle and the team work required to coordinate putting together all the buildings at once. The integration of the floor matts into the entire room assembly seems a little vague at the moment and it will be nice to see an entire room assembly.


Reviewer 8:

comments provided on Hans Kobor's review form
The additional commentary on the storyboard is helpful to understand why the room is designed how it is, although it will be hard to know how long this challenge take people without play testing. The building connections and surface finish are well defined and look feasible. Could you clarify how the between building supports fit into this? Are they separate pieces, or part of the a building block? If they are part of a building block, how will you make sure they don't break off when the building block falls at the end of the game? If they are separate pieces, what stops them from sliding down once they are placed between two buildings, and is there any indication for where to place them, or is that part of the puzzle? Overall it seems like an exciting and novel concept, and hopefully no one will walk away with the building blocks...


Reviewer 9:

comments provided on Hans Kobor's review form
The Post Apocalyptic City storyboard and system assembly comprehensively address the questions raised during the review (mechanism, number of pieces, proportions). With regards to the main assembly, I am not sure how the pneumatic piston is hidden under the floor... is the room raised on a platform? How is the concealment of the internal structure under the room floor accomplished? Both the storyboard and the system assembly utilize a full range of drawings that allow the play, aesthetic and mechanism to be understood.


Reviewer 10:

comments provided on Hans Kobor's review form
I like this idea a lot! I think it allows people to have both mental and physical challenges. I guess through testing you can better determine how many buildings there should be. Right now, there seems like a lot, which may be a little too difficult, especially with the color aspect coming into play.


Reviewer 11:

comments provided on Megan McCleneghan's review form
I think this is a great idea and a fun game to play. My only concern is making the blocks light enough to lift, but also durable enough to be picked up, dropped, and thrown. What do you plan to make the blocks out of?


Reviewer 12:

comments provided on Megan McCleneghan's review form
I think that this idea is really cool and it'd be a fun and original puzzle to solve. The only think I would mention is probably to ensure that the conductive ends of each building piece aren't in the same orientation as each other (unless those two specific pieces are meant to connect) or else it seems like it would be possible to complete the circuit without fully completing the building


Reviewer 13:

comments provided on Megan McCleneghan's review form
I think that the gag for this room is really fun, and it would be a fun puzzle to solve. I think you have thought through in detail how to make it work, and there is nothing that particularly stands out to me as something that won't work.


Reviewer 14:

comments provided on Thomas Mangan's review form
It shows clearly. I am still curious how the system senses that the architecture is assembled in a right way.


Reviewer 15:

comments provided on Thomas Mangan's review form
This seems like a really fun game that cleverly gets the whole team involved. It doesn't require too much cost or complexity, and also uniquely integrates the gameplay and theme.

The full room schematic seems very hard though. I think maybe a few buildings rather than 10 would make the game less frustrating. I do like the idea of having hand supported pieces though,


Reviewer 16:

comments provided on Thomas Mangan's review form
This seems like a very entertaining and frustrating room that people would come back to over and over since it's easy to understand but difficult to execute- nice job. I still have some concerns about the feasibility of this, especially with only two people. It still seems like the bridges only stay stable if the other pieces are being held until all the bridges are in place. Is it possible to do something with electromagnets so that buildings will stay up but then fall down again if they're not reinforced within a given time limit? I think something like that would make it more feasible with smaller groups.


Reviewer 17:

comments provided on Yakov Berenshteyn's review form
The operation sounds fun! It looks like you've thought about the circuitry that needs to be implemented to detect when the building is complete. The collaboration needed to build up all the buildings makes for a pleasant user experience.