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Concept Sketch Reviews
Home > Assignments > Concept sketch results > Reviews for Claire Robinson

Claire Robinson
team ark
[review]

StoryboardConcept Sketches
 Sweet and Sour Timed Room Lighting Colored Tube Lights Constantly Colored Tubes Presentation
Average Rating
 
Client 1:
Client 2:
Reviewer 3:
Reviewer 4:
1-marginal     2-ok    3-good     4-very good    5-outstanding

Storyboard Sweet and Sour: innovativeness and potential

Client 1:

Having to enter the correct "code" into the candy jars, then read that code back to type into a keypad seems an unnecessary step that adds little to the user experience. I recommend awarding success and unlocking the door immediately after completing the candy jars.

The slight delay to obscure which action caused failure may take away from the fun of the "aha!" moment. Not knowing what was wrong means that many groups will have to win by luck rather than knowledge and may never feel they understand what allowed them to succeed.

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Client 2:

Very clever idea. I like the false-hint mechanic. I also appreciate that you considered how this color-based game would be played by colorblind people.

I think you have a complete game here without including the keypad at the end. Remember that Open World rooms are not escape rooms - players are there to solve puzzles, etc., not to try and get out.

I wonder if you are restricting yourself by requiring one player to be the actor and one player to be the agent. With larger groups, you want everyone to be involved. I'd like to see a few more ways that you can incorporate the good/bad mechanic that allows larger groups to work together. I could see a version of this that's a bit like Simon Says, where you have to do what the room "says" (via lights, audio cues, etc), but only while the ambient lighting is pink.

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Reviewer 3:

This is a really interesting and unique concept for a room theme--I like it a lot. I do have some comments on your storyboard but not much:

-How do the actors/operators know they want to go out the door with the code? Is it the door they came in? If so, how did they get in but cant get out? -- If its a different door, then you should almost make the door they entered disappear into the wall from the inside. Otherwise I think the immediate instinct is to go out the door they entered.

-I think changing this ^ detail will help give the actors a little more motivation to try and figure out how to get out. Like, they enter the room and realize they are trapped. They see a door on the opposite side of the room with a key pad but have no idea what the code is, so they realize they need to mess with the stuff in the room to try and find the code. I think this will also make it more clear that the lit tubes are the code when they get it right.

-What is the failure mode for the red herring hints? Is it a 3 strikes youre out kind of deal? Also, what is the point of having the failure alarm happen on a slight delay?

-An example of a clue would make it more clear what you are going for. Is the control panel just telling which one to turn, but it is false during the green light time?

-How do you plan on resetting the candies back into the tubes? This is one of those "lots of small parts can cause cause chaos" situations. Self-resetting will be difficult and the players may easily walk off with these, especially if they are candy. Maybe you can do something like at 5Wits with the water tubes instead, they had a good system for something similar to this. Or maybe have it all encased, so they can turn the dials but cant actually touch any of the falling candy.

-Lastly, I think it may work out a little more if you delineate between the sweet and sour. Like maybe do sweet as candy and sour as like sour milk or something--to show that sour is actually undesirable. Some people actually prefer sour candies (War heads, sour patch kids, lime flavored things) over sweet--so it wont be clear that those are actually undesirable things.

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Reviewer 4:

This is a great example of a game that is difficult to figure out, but engaging for the players. I like the idea of communicating across a barrier, however it is unclear how the players know who is "operator" and who is "actor." Will there be instructions? Overall this seems like a great player experience that fits the idea of an escape room.

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Potential, feasibility, user experience and human factors shown in the concept sketch, Timed Room Lighting

Client 1:

This method of subtly hinting clue validity seems great! It's fairly obscure, but can be made more or less intense to tune the experience easily.

The exact nature of the clues that are given are to the "operator" are not well described here. More detail on that would be helpful for this concept.

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Client 2:

I think this is my favorite of your three concepts. The lighting can be subtle enough that players may not catch the cue right away, but it's obvious enough that they're likely to pick up on it after a bunch of rounds. Like I said above, the gameplay might need to be altered somewhat, but I think ambient lights are a good way of sending the sweet/sour cue. One other thing you might play with in this vein is the use of a projector, which could be used on the floor or walls to reinforce the cues.

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Reviewer 3:

This first sketch is really clean--I apprecaiate that you used a straight edge for your lines it really helps create a professional feel. I wish you had added some shading to show the different lights rather than just the pencil marks, right now the pencil marks make it look like rope or something coming from the floor, but with the text I was able to tie in what it is.

This concept is definitely fesible.

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Reviewer 4:

I really like the idea of having the surroundings involved in the feedback. The delay is a great idea to make the game more engaging. It's also great that you are thinking about a range of users. The only concern I have is the fact that these rooms are open-top, so depending on the level of ambient light, the color of the lights inside the room may be difficult to see.

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Potential, feasibility, user experience and human factors shown in the concept sketch, Colored Tube Lights

Client 1:

This method seems to be a clear way to communicate to the "operator" which tubes need to be activated. Maybe a bigger "wow" factor, depending on how interesting the tube lighting looks.

Lighting one side of the tube without the light bleeding through to the "actor" might be difficult when using the clear glass/acrylic tubes associated with candy dispensers.

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Client 2:

I think this concept and your next one are too restrictive - you have a whole room to use, but the cues are tied to just one prop, which (potentially) only one player can see at a time. If you make cues available to the whole group at the same time, you will encourage collaboration (and arguing!), which is a good thing.

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Reviewer 3:

The fruits are cute and well drawn, but this sketch doesnt give me any indication of how the images of the strawberry and lime will appear. Is it its own LCD on the front of the container? Or are the fruits just always there?

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Reviewer 4:

Giving both the operator and the actor feedback is an interesting idea, and seems like it would make the game more engaging for both players. It would be nice to have some more detail on what the tubes are made of and how you plan to flash these symbols and colors on the tubes.

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Potential, feasibility, user experience and human factors shown in the concept sketch, Constantly Colored Tubes

Client 1:

This idea splits the knowledge nicely, forcing both players to think about their actions.

Again, the way in which the clues are given to the "operator" is not specified, and needs to be decided for a complete description of the game.

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Client 2:

See above

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Reviewer 3:

What does the purpose of the lights in this scenario do? Are the hints irrelevant if the lights are already on the tubes? I like the idea, and you can definitely make it happen technically, but the play scenario behind it is unclear to me as a reader.

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Reviewer 4:

This is similar to the second concept, but it is unclear what exactly the operator and actor would be communicating. Will the tubes ever change color? How will this engage the operator in the game? Again, it would help to know how the tubes will change color.

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Sketching technique, clarity of storyboard and concept sketches, and their web presentation

Client 1:

These storyboards are fairly incomplete, as the game hinges clue communications that are not described.

This concept may be limited in it's ability to engage large groups of players.

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Client 2:

Good job on the website. Few bells and whistles, but it doesn't need them. I did see one bug - from the storyboard page, clicking on the concept sketches link gives me a certificate error.

Overall, well done.

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Reviewer 3:

Website:

-Your website is very simply laid out, but it is clean which is nice.

-All of your images are formatted well so they fit in my browser without needing to zoom in or out.

Storyboard:

-Like your storyboard sketches a lot, they are clean and well drawn. I wish you had some more visuals of what the entire room looks like--but I was able to piece it together from the individual images.

Concepts:

-Your concept sketches are pretty clean to look at which I appreciate! A little more shading would help make it clear what you are doing with the lights.

-Some of the concept sketches, though clean, do not clarify the way the game is played. It is a little confusing. The sketches themselves though are on the whole pretty nice!

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Reviewer 4:

The sketches clearly show the space and how the users interact with the game elements. However, given all the description of colors, it would have been nice to see them in the sketches. Overall, the storyboard and concept sketches were very well presented on a clear website platform. Well done!

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