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Emily Hsu
she wolf
[review]

StoryboardConcept Sketches
 Resistor Escape! Resistor Color Diagram Color Hold Disco Floor Presentation
Average Rating
 
Client 1:
Client 2:
Reviewer 3:
Reviewer 4:
Reviewer 5:
1-marginal     2-ok    3-good     4-very good    5-outstanding

Storyboard Resistor Escape!: innovativeness and potential

Client 1:

This is a neat little idea. Be careful to not require any outside knowledge (of resistors) to solve a puzzle. It can be very frustrating to guests.

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Client 2:

Sounds like fun. It's very similar to the first room of 27 Seconds at Boda Borg (maybe you've seen it?).

I'm a little confused about how this room plays with multiple people. Do all of them have to follow the same path through the room? Are there multiple paths per resistor value? You say that the team has to touch the correct handles in the correct order - does that mean the correct order in time, or the correct order as they make their way across the space? Does touching an incorrect handle result in room failure?

I think the gameplay has potential. I think we'll have to be careful with the specifics of it to avoid feeling like a Boda Borg derivative, but I think changing the "form factor" of the room can be done without changing the concept too much.

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Reviewer 3:

I personally like very much this idea, however, I think it's hard to judge it as a great one when we consider the average public reaction to it. Electronically themed gags might be very attractive for electrical engineers and other kinds of electronic enthusiasts. But, for your pretty much anyone out of the field, I don't think that the resistance measuring idea is going to be very attractive. Maybe try to implement something less "technical", like deactivating lasers or security cameras by mixing wire connections, something like that.

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Reviewer 4:

The flow of the storyboard makes sense and is innovative. I was a little confused by why the door was open for one of the sketches that was showing the color diagram. Also, when the team loses and the alarm sounds, what would prevent them from just going to the door anyway? There'd have to be some indicator like locking the door closed that would tell them that they can't go to the door anymore and have to start over. This is an easy problem to fix, and I think the storyboard could work and has potential.

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Reviewer 5:

I like the concept and the combination of thinking puzzle and physical difficulty. I'm not sure I understand the diagram and matching with the numbers but I'm sure it would be more clear in practice. I wish there were another one or two panels that showed some of this trial and error process of matching the colors to the numbers so that I could get a better idea of how that part of the puzzle works and its level of difficulty.

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Potential, feasibility, user experience and human factors shown in the concept sketch, Resistor Color Diagram

Client 1:

The addition of the resistor diagram with example is very helpful. Does the general public find math fun?

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Client 2:

I have mixed feelings about this variation. On one hand, I personally would like to play it. On the other, it's very specific to the IEC color convention. The part that I'm on the fence about is that in a room/theme/world that's relatively abstract, calling in a very specific real-world convention feels somewhat out of place. I think you could develop a system yourself that's very similar to the IEC convention but doesn't match it exactly.

I have the same questions about this variation as I did about the storyboard - namely, that I'm not sure how players are supposed to grab the handles (in sequence, all at once, in multiple sequences as they make their way across the room...?)

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Reviewer 3:

100% feasible. However - kind of repeating myself here -, the average public might struggle more than you think with the resistor color diagram, what could maybe compromise the user experience expectations (I propose the solution gave in the critique above).

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Reviewer 4:

I think I a little confused by the explanation for this concept. To my understanding, the players can only touch the 4 colors corresponding to the numbers? This may not make sense for some people, because not everyone is familiar with resistors (and that they use strips of color to communicate value). For these people, the colors -> numbers concept might seem random. Also, it might not make sense for people who understand resistors because it doesn't replicate the actual values of resistors in real life. I think a good opportunity to add innovativeness and potential for this concept is to find a way to translate which handles they should use in a way that they can make sense of.

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Reviewer 5:

Well that addresses my storyboard critique! Since all numbers 0-9 are showed here it makes a lot more sense to me now. I also really like the multiplier aspect, it adds a bit of difficulty into what could otherwise be a too-obvious puzzle. In the storyboard, it is mentioned that colors need to be touched in the right order -- does that remain true here?

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Potential, feasibility, user experience and human factors shown in the concept sketch, Color Hold

Client 1:

How do guests get to where they need to go around the room if they can't touch the ground? If they are using the handles, how does the show "know" they are getting in position as opposed to giving the wrong answer?

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Client 2:

This is almost exactly the game in 27 Seconds that I mentioned above. It's very successful, and it's actually my favorite room in Boda Borg. Unfortunately, that means that we can't use it for Open World. It's possible that changing the form factor might solve that problem (instead of handles on the walls, maybe incorporate something like monkey bars with different colored rungs?)

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Reviewer 3:

Also 100% feasible. User experience and human factors seem good. I would only be aware not to make it physically too challenging. In addition, how do you pretend to implement the activation mechanism for those handles? Are they going to be weight sensitive? Besides that, I don't have much to add to your idea, everything seems well forwarded.

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Reviewer 4:

This concept will have similar feedback from Concept 1 since all that is changing is the way a successful input is defined. I think this would be slightly easier to implement functionally so might be more favorable.

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Reviewer 5:

This is an interesting variation. I think it's a bit more complex than the original and variation 1, as it isn't necessarily clear immediately that crossing is the purpose of the game. Does this mean any colors can be touched on a team member's way to reaching the final colors they will be holding?

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Potential, feasibility, user experience and human factors shown in the concept sketch, Disco Floor

Client 1:

The added complexity of the disco floor significantly drives up cost, risk, etc. Is that worth it?

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Client 2:

I like this idea because it adds much more of a mystery element to the game. I can see players cycling through 5 times before they even have a clue about which handles to grab.

My colleagues tell me that putting game elements in the floor is tough. Maybe you could move the floor tiles to the walls (up near the ceiling, like a decorative border?)

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Reviewer 3:

The same comments made to the color hold sketch apply here. In addition, it would also be nice to know how the colored panels are going to be activated, just like the handles.

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Reviewer 4:

I like the idea of using the floor as well as the handles on the wall because this makes the players engage with the room more physically. Feedback from Concept 1 also applies to this concept.

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Reviewer 5:

This is a more visually interesting design but might be too difficult/too easy for different teams depending on the heights of the teammembers, i.e. those with shorter people might have difficulty reaching the wall and the floor at the same time, or those with taller people don't need to use the hand holds at all and can just jump from floor tile to floor tile.

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Sketching technique, clarity of storyboard and concept sketches, and their web presentation

Client 1:

The storyboard and concept sketches were very clear and easy to understand.

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Client 2:

Fantastic. Very clean and well-presented. I like your use of shading - it complements the two-point perspective drawings well.

I think that your concept sketches could have used a frame or two more each to give a little more detail to the variations. I'm thinking specifically of the Disco Floor variation, where I don't quite understand how the colors on the floor correspond to the handholds on the walls.

Also, a small thing: I like that your font reflects the theme. I went back and looked at your last presentation, and I was pleased to find that you had a fantasy theme to that storyboard, in contrast to the cyberspace theme in this one.

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Reviewer 3:

I appreciate very much the rich use of colors. All in all, all sketches are very well drawn, self-explanatory and clear. The players could maybe be improved in terms of perspective techniques. About the web presentation, also very clear and user-friendly, besides being very theme immersive - mainly because of the font style.

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Reviewer 4:

The drawings were clear in the presentation, but I had a hard time understanding some explanations. Don't be afraid to clarify important points and assume no previous knowledge about the content. For the sketching, I would try to avoid using smudge-able markers, especially when using different colors. I think the concepts would have benefited if you included more in-depth close-up sketches about how the handles and tiles would look like. How would the sensors be embedded or hidden? etc.

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Reviewer 5:

Your sketches are great and super clear, and the website design is easy to follow and easy to read.

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