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Home > Assignments > Concept sketch results > Reviews for Erika Anderson

Erika Anderson
eager beavers
[review]

StoryboardConcept Sketches
 Fix the Broken Artifact! Tilted Pedestal Magnetic Puzzle Pieces Orientation RFID Tags Presentation
Average Rating
 
Client 1:
Reviewer 2:
Reviewer 3:
1-marginal     2-ok    3-good     4-very good    5-outstanding

Storyboard Fix the Broken Artifact!: innovativeness and potential

Client 1:

Decent idea. How does it reset? How are the pieces recognized? How do you keep guests from stealing parts?

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Reviewer 2:

In general, the room is interesting in the sense that the players should build something in a short amount of time. I am still not quite sure about the losing scenario of the game. I noticed the guard saying "who is there" in the storyboard; however, I am not sure what would happen if the players do not finish in a short amount of time. One suggestion would be to put a light column on them and this way they will figure out that they have been caught by the guard. In order to add more complexity to the game, the light column can also go around in the room while players are putting the puzzle together and they should avoid it in order to not to get caught by the guard.

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Reviewer 3:

I think this is a fun concept which fits in well with the overall theme that you've proposed; it will be very intuitive for the participants to understand what exactly they have to do, and it should also pretty easily engage 2-5 people depending upon the complexity of the puzzle. I also think that the level of engagement will partially be dictated by how interesting the artifact itself is that has been broken. Have you thought about what you want that artifact to be?

It's probably a good idea to think about how you are going to encourage people to move out of the room once the time has expired, but this concept still lends itself well to that. Perhaps you could have the museum's alarm go off - the main lights could go out and emergency lighting could come on to discourage them from continuing to work with the puzzle (I realize your storyboard shows a success condition, so you may also have already thought through all of this).

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Potential, feasibility, user experience and human factors shown in the concept sketch, Tilted Pedestal

Client 1:

I like this mechanism. This is a smart way to reset. You'd probably want to use a pneumatic cylinder. I don't think you'll need enough throw to justify a scissor lift. Note that there could be a safety issue of pinched toes, but it sounds like this happens when nobody is in the room?

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Reviewer 2:

The pedestal idea is a very interesting as it makes the room self-resetting. I would recommend using a foam like material near the area that puzzle pieces are going to fall to avoid potential damages to the pieces. Furthermore, using the foam helps the pieces to not to bounce after hitting the ground and fall in corners of the room that are hard for the players to find them.

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Reviewer 3:

This seems like a great, simple way to execute an automatic reset for this particular room. The function of the pedestal is clear, and it's easy to conceptualize a sketch model (and full fidelity model) for this component in order to check what height, angle, and coefficient of friction (i.e., material) you want that top surface to be in order to get the level of breakage you need from your artifact.

One aspect of this reset mechanism that I suspect you're already considering is how the artifact will hold up to hundreds of cycles of falling off the pedestal. Even if it's a relatively short fall, that type of cycling could cause some wear and tear to the artifact pieces or to the floor of the room. I'm not sure which one will be more expensive to replace, but you probably want to adjust the relative hardness of those two components so you have one which is intended to be the wear piece.

The sketch is very clear and communicates what the pedestal will do. I could be wrong about this, but I ran into an issue that you may also have run into, which is that drawing a relatively tall object with a significant horizon offset looks a little funny without vertical foreshortening. Overall, though, you did a great job of executing your sketch with the tools we've been given.

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Potential, feasibility, user experience and human factors shown in the concept sketch, Magnetic Puzzle Pieces

Client 1:

How is this fabricated to get the magnets inside of the pieces where they are not noticeable to guests? Will this make the puzzle easier or harder? Why is it necessary?

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Reviewer 2:

The magnetic puzzle piece helps the players a lot in putting the parts together. I have 2 main concerns about the magnetic pieces.

1. I am not sure if all the magnetic pieces will be detached as a result of falling on the ground. Even if this happens, there is a high chance that the matching parts would fall close to each other and it would be easier for the next group to find the matching parts.

2. I am not sure if the puzzle will give some picture/pattern once it is formed. If that is the case, players can just try to make the pattern and the magnetic pieces may not be necessary. It would be great if further clarification on this note can be provided.

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Reviewer 3:

In addition to any decoration on the pieces and the shape of the pieces themselves, this seems like a great way to provide positive feedback that the users are re-assembling the artifact properly. It also probably gives you latitude to make the broken pieces much more regular in shape, increasing the prima facie difficulty of the puzzle while simultaneously making it easier to implement your RFID concept.

I do think that sketch modeling this is going to be really important. It's possible that some degree of frustration could arise from pieces that aren't meant to be connected automatically aligning and pulling themselves together (albeit obliquely) while the team is trying to figure out which pieces go where. If you have a chance, you should google "Shrine of the Silver Monkey" to see just how bad people can be at assembling 3D puzzles. This challenge can probably be managed with how you shape the pieces and where you place the magnets.

One slight concern I have with this concept is the potential theft risk. It seems possible that someone could pocket one of these pieces, detrimentally affecting the experience for other users. It may not be the best solution, but perhaps the RFID tags in the pieces themselves could be part of a theft prevention system? You could also have the pieces attached by relatively long pieces of wire to the pedestal itself, but I'm not sure if this may affect the experience.

Once again, your sketch was very clear, especially in conjunction with the storyboard. One thing to look out for is to try and make sure the minor axis of your ellipses are aligned with the normal of the surface you want them to appear circular on.

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Potential, feasibility, user experience and human factors shown in the concept sketch, Orientation RFID Tags

Client 1:

There are probably more cost effective ways to do this. I would look into using magnets and have magnetic reed switches in the base. Using enough different locations you can essentially read a binary code of each piece (may need to change how they 'snap' together). RFID tags are really finicky (especially when there are a bunch near each other and they are near magnets), it could work, I just think you'd have a much easier time doing it another way.

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Reviewer 2:

The RFID tag is a very clever idea for the room to figure out if the puzzle has put together in the correct way or not. The only concern that I is the process of building these puzzle pieces. They have to be durable as they will fall on the ground several times during the day. In addition, they need to have room for the magnets and the RFID tag. This might not be a huge challenge but it is still something to consider when building the actual pieces.

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Reviewer 3:

This seems like a good method for giving confirmation that the artifact has been re-assembled properly. I admittedly don't know if RFID tags can detect orientation or if you will need multiple tags within a given piece to detect it's orientation. That being said, this is clearly leveraging a technology that 5Wits is going to be using already, so the expertise and parts to implement this concept should be there. It's also nice that all of this is hidden from the user, so they can still interact with pieces that feel like they really could be antiquities from a museum.

With respect to how this is implemented in terms of human user interactions, there may be some cool subtle ways that you can encourage the proper orientation of the artifact without explicitly providing cardinal directions. For example, the pedestal top could have a 'dust outline' which shows how the artifact was oriented before it fell and broke.

Overall, RFID seems like the dominant strategy for executing the win/fail confirmation in this room. I think it should work.

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Sketching technique, clarity of storyboard and concept sketches, and their web presentation

Client 1:

Nice sketches. Well laid out website.

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Reviewer 2:

The sketches are very clear and shading techniques are used in an appropriate way to further illustrate the objects.

The storyboard is very clear in showing the winning scenario. However, as mentioned earlier, the losing scenario should be also be clear.

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Reviewer 3:

All of the sketches are, by and large, technically sound according to the techniques we've learned. As I indicated above, I think that paying attention to aligning the minor axes of your ellipses to the normal of surfaces could help a bit.

The storyboard was very clear and presentation ready. I think anyone could read through this storyboard and get a good feel for what the room experience would be like.

The web presentation is also very well done. It's simple and easy to navigate, and the actual content I need to focus on is easy to find.

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