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Concept Sketch Reviews
Home > Assignments > Concept sketch results > Reviews for Jean Carlos Serrano

Jean Carlos Serrano
she wolf
[review]

StoryboardConcept Sketches
 The Circuit Room The Wall The Resistor The Battery Presentation
Average Rating
 
Client 1:
Client 2:
Reviewer 3:
Reviewer 4:
Reviewer 5:
1-marginal     2-ok    3-good     4-very good    5-outstanding

Storyboard The Circuit Room: innovativeness and potential

Client 1:

The use of resistors could match very well with a game for this project. Overall, this concept needs some clarity regarding what type of puzzle is it. There are multiple parts of this challenge, but it seems like it could be difficult for the guests to understand what they need to do and why.

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Client 2:

Nice mystery puzzle. I like the use of the battery as a timing mechanism. I wonder if you could ramp up the difficulty of this relatively simple "trace-the-path" game by giving the resistors different values. If a circuit is completed but the "resistance" is too low or too high, you could give appropriate feedback (you could have a lot of fun coming up with audio/visual cues to indicate that you had blown out the circuit!).

My one concern about this game is that it uses a very small percentage of the space - a bit over half of the wall space and actually 0% of the floor space. That could end up being a good thing if we have to fill a particularly small room - just noting that if you have 100-200 square feet of space to use, then you don't have to confine your game to just two walls.

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Reviewer 3:

I think this could be an interesting idea. I think there could be a better distinction as to why certain connections should go where. Players will just randomly have to change wires, but may not necessarily know why or when they're starting to get to a right decision. Maybe the battery lights could slowly start lighting up again the more connections they get right.

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Reviewer 4:

I think this is a great challenge, and it's fun to be the size of a circuit. I'd like to know more about what it takes to correctly connect the wires with the resistors, does it take circuit knowledge? I don't think you should assume that the players know about resistor values, or even necessarily know what a resistor is (there are smart people who like puzzles but aren't engineers).

I think there is still potential in this idea though, because it is a very innovative theme. You could consider having the players complete circuits with their body, or just use large "wires" instead of resistors.

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Reviewer 5:

The circuit room idea seems very feasible in the space we have and a fun puzzle game! The lighting up of the path also is a fun addition and will add to the experience. However, how does the team fail? Or what would happen if they only got half of the path right before the battery ran out and both walls are left with resistors?

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Potential, feasibility, user experience and human factors shown in the concept sketch, The Wall

Client 1:

What is this made of? Are they wires with magnets on them? Are they moving parts? Do they slide in the wall? The lines are very straight (all 90 degree angles). Does this mean they are not wires? Are they rigid parts, like puzzle pieces?

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Client 2:

I'm curious why you decided to restrict the orientation of the resistors to the horizontal axis. I'm not against it, but I think distributing the resistor docks across the whole wall would add another layer of difficulty to the game. I'm also thinking about whether you actually need two separate circuits to accomplish the A/B solution states. My concern is that people will be confused by the presence of two separate puzzles when they only need to solve one. I think that if you use LED strips to mark out the vertical lines, you can dynamically adjust which "wires" are present for each group, which makes the solution necessarily different. That way you could also use both walls (or even potentially all four) for the puzzle.

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Reviewer 3:

I like the feel of the wall and that it feels very technological. It would be nice to have a close up as to how the connections might work to show that these wires are moveable.

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Reviewer 4:

I think this is very interesting both visually and ties well into the puzzle in the room. One thing to consider is what are the green lights that represent wires? Are they LED strips, tubes with gas in them? This will affect how the movable components tie in. Some options will be easier to implement than others, but it's definitely possible to do.

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Reviewer 5:

I like the idea of the lighted pathways to guide the players. How will you sense that the resistors have been placed in the correct slots? Do specific resistors have to be placed in specific spots or are they interchangeable? The concept seems very feasible in the space provided and would provide a fun and interactive user experience.

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Potential, feasibility, user experience and human factors shown in the concept sketch, The Resistor

Client 1:

What are the approximate size of these resistors? How do they stay in the wall? Are the guests playing a game of guess and check or is there logic involved?

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Client 2:

Nice simplification of the resistor concept. I'm not sure you actually need to make it have two real terminals - a more durable way to build it would be to mount it to a block so it *looks* like the two wires are going in to the block, but the block itself is what sits in the wall. You could put sensors (RFID, magnet, optical?) in the wall to detect when a block was present or not present, rather than actually completing a circuit.

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Reviewer 3:

This is pretty straight-forward and a good drawing. Again, it would be nice to see how the connection would work, and how a player might notice that this is a movable piece and not just something stuck to the wall.

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Reviewer 4:

How big are these resistors and what are they made of? They need to be light enough for players of all sizes to pick up and move around.

How is the correct set of resistors found? Is it just guess and check?

I do think it's good to have the nodes be places that the resistors fit in easily, this helps with making the room easier to understand for people who don't know anything about circuits.

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Reviewer 5:

I like the idea of having to physically place objects to solve the puzzle, it allows all team members to get involved. Are all the resistors the same size? Have you thought about how they will stick into the wall easily, but also without falling out? Magnets might be a potential solution to ensure that the resistors fit snugly.

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Potential, feasibility, user experience and human factors shown in the concept sketch, The Battery

Client 1:

Is the meaning of the colors clear and intuitive? Is there a way to make this concept clearer?

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Client 2:

I really like the use of the battery as a timing device. My only minor comment is that I would emphasize (via fabrication or graphic design) that it's a battery and not just a timer.

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Reviewer 3:

This looks pretty much like what was in the storyboard. I think this would work in showing the difference in battery charge and enough lights that it will show the progression of losing battery life. I'm not sure people will associate it with a battery, but I think that's fine.

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Reviewer 4:

I really like how the battery is used in this room, as both a power source for the circuit and a timer. However, the design currently looks more like a stoplight than a battery. If you could use the same light system but make it look like the battery indicator on a computer of phone it would be clearer that it is a battery.

Overall though, the system with different colored light makes it simple to build and clearly communicates what level it is at.

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Reviewer 5:

I like the idea of a visual countdown. I would suggest also adding sound effects to indicate a dying battery or some kind of other notification to indicate that time is running out. The players might get so involved in placing the resistors that they may forget to look at the battery, but will be reminded of it by sound.

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Sketching technique, clarity of storyboard and concept sketches, and their web presentation

Client 1:

The storyboards would be easier to understand if the pictures could better represent the concept. Currently, there is a lot of text trying to depict what the pictures should represent.

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Client 2:

I would have liked to see a link between your storyboard and concept pages. Other than that, very good production value. Your concept pages in particular are very clean and the effort you put into the drawings shows.

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Reviewer 3:

The page layout is nice. It would be nice to be able to go back to the storyboard from the concept sketches. I think the storyboard could have been a little more clear. I found myself needing to reread it to understand, but perhaps that's just me.

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Reviewer 4:

I think your sketches were very good, and I liked the use of color to show the parts that really needed color. Some more shading would have been nice, but the sketches communicated the ideas.

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Reviewer 5:

Good, clear sketches and descriptions. You used 2 point perspective well and used color appropriately. I would suggest being consistent with the marker use and colored pencil use. The marker looks so much cleaner than the colored pencil, I almost wish the color was also done with marker. Your website is also very intuitive and easy to use.

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