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Jennifer Leung
the remainders
[review]

StoryboardConcept Sketches
 The Acrobat The Room The Buttons The Pedestal Presentation
Average Rating
 
Client 1:
Client 2:
Reviewer 3:
Reviewer 4:
Reviewer 5:
1-marginal     2-ok    3-good     4-very good    5-outstanding

Storyboard The Acrobat: innovativeness and potential

Client 1:

Sounds like a fun game! Lasers are hard to do without any haze - they help you be able to see the beams. Maybe there is another way to create this effect.

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Client 2:

I really like the idea of the room being dark initially, and lighting up to show museum walls. I'm not sure how you'd do it, though. If you're projecting the museum scene on the walls, but the players have to walk through the room, then how will the players not end up blocking some of the projection?

A gameplay question: the lasers go away when one player steps on the pressure plate. You designed the game with the intention of the players stepping off the pressure plate and avoiding the lasers on their way to hit the buttons. But what's preventing one player from just standing on the pressure plate while the others walk across the room and hit the buttons? Are the lasers still 'on' while the pressure plate is pushed, just not visible? So the players have to be on the plate to see where the buttons are, and then step off to see where to avoid the lasers?

I also like that you've rewarded the players at the end with the glass box around the goblet opening, to show that they've won the game. You can't automatically open the exit door at this time - the exit door will be closed but unlocked the whole game - but I like the goblet effect.

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Reviewer 3:

(there isn't a storyboard so I can't comment on this)

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Reviewer 4:

To me the concept didn't seem super original (very similar to the laser scene in Ocean's Twelve). In addition to that, although technically the unlock buttons can be found and pressed by the same player, that might take a while. So the game is limited to only groups of players. The puzzle seems very straightforward and clear for the users to solve.

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Reviewer 5:

This looks so fun! I think this takes the concept of the 5Wits laser tunnel and elevates it by making it such that the participants must venture through the lasers in multiple vectors, increasing the challenge and forcing them to find multiple ways to contort through the laser field. I also love the idea that one of the users must toggle between a room view and a laser view in order to help her team accomplish the task.

I think the highest compliment that can be made for any of these rooms (assuming that the can be effectively implemented) is that someone wants to experience them, and I would 100% want to try my hand at this room. I'm not sure if you've seen Ocean's Twelve, but this room immediately evoked memories of this scene:

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Having the right soundtrack in place could definitely elevate this concept!

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Potential, feasibility, user experience and human factors shown in the concept sketch, The Room

Client 1:

The Layout and gameplay sound good. It seems like it would be a fun space to play in.

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Client 2:

What happens if the goblet unlock button is pressed before the room buttons are pressed, but not while the pressure plate is depressed? Do the buttons still blink? Consider whether you want the mystery of how to open the goblet case to be one of the principal challenges of the room, or if you just want the main challenge to be avoiding the lasers (and the buttons will serve as a reason to cross the room). If you want the mystery to be part of the challenge, it makes sense to do nothing if the unlock button is pressed while the room is dark and the wall buttons have not been pressed. If you want the lasers to serve as the main challenge, then you might want to help guests out some more if they get to that point without pressing any of the buttons.

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Reviewer 3:

I'm a little confused by this. I'm not sure I understand why the sides of the room need to be revealed by a press of a button instead of just being visible upon entrance. I think the room will be more engaging if the players can see that they are in a museum (?) instead of a white room with a goblet in the middle. Also, this mentions a panel, but I'm not sure which panel to which it refers. Is the panel the same as the button on the pedestal?

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Reviewer 4:

The sketch is not that great. The picture of the museum in the background seems copied from the internet and not original. You could have added more details about the lasers' patterns or the force plate to it.

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Reviewer 5:

The concept of the toggled room where one view is the fully decorated room and the other reveals the lasers is extremely cool. It also probably gives you a greater degree of latitude for how you can decorate the room in the non-laser view. Giving the user multiple cues for what they are supposed to do in the laser room is a nice touch and increases the intuitiveness of the gag.

I wonder if you may want to make the default image of the room the fully lit one? You could test this in your sketch model; for some reason it seems a little more intuitive to me that you would press on a pressure plate to 'reveal' the lasers rather than revealing the plain decorated room.

One note on the sketches themselves is that I think you may have foreshortened in the wrong direction. The perspective is right, but it looks like the sides of the room are receding away, or that the goblet is at the intersection of two hallways. If you wanted to make it look like a rectangular room, you'd want to extend the edges of your top and bottom lines that you did not use.

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Potential, feasibility, user experience and human factors shown in the concept sketch, The Buttons

Client 1:

20 buttons is a lot of buttons! This may be a pretty high scope for a room like this. Also, if they are going to need a power wire, we would probably also use a data signal to have them communicate instead of a wireless connection.

The cloth is a good idea for hiding them. Maybe you would need to think about what that would really look like to the guest.

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Client 2:

Your sketch and your description make it clear what you are trying to do here, and I understand what you're going for. I like that you've considered that the cloth will get dirty after people touch it all day. Can a projector still project a museum wall onto the cloth if the cloth is dark? Genuine question - I really don't know. And you'd still have to figure out how to project onto the walls without the players blocking the projection and seeing their shadows on the wall (unless you're ok with them seeing their own shadows and recognizing the effect as a projection, which is a possibility... depends on how it affects the overall experience of the room).

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Reviewer 3:

20 buttons might be too many, especially if the rooms are meant to hold 6 people at capacity. I think it might be more interesting if existing objects in the room were to be the "buttons." (ie, a vase or a doorknob) Buttons seem a bit out of place here.

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Reviewer 4:

I'm not sure if you were supposed to dive deep into how the buttons worked, or rather just draw a sketch of it. I would have loved to seen a sketch of how

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Reviewer 5:

It seems like you've put a significant degree of thought into how the disguiseable buttons concept could work, and I think the concept of having a false wall made of cloth is a great idea for achieving that effect. You also did a good job of outlining the other human use factors that this could influence (e.g., the potential advantage of not showing dirt).

One thing to think about is how the dark cloth wall is going to interact with the laser field. You may have to have cutouts for the lasers as well as the sensors that tell the room whether a laser has been interrupted. The other potential concern that I would have is the durability of cloth walls - the likelihood that they could tear seems high, although this could probably be ameliorated by the type of cloth that you select.

Are the buttons themselves going to be simple touch sensors, or will they be tactile (i.e., will they depress when they are pushed)? The latter could be an important way to let the users know that they have actually correctly located one of the buttons.

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Potential, feasibility, user experience and human factors shown in the concept sketch, The Pedestal

Client 1:

Looks cool! How would the glass retract? That could be a tricky mechanism. Maybe you could just use a light cue instead and not having any moving parts. (red vs green)

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Client 2:

In order for the pedestal to work as you've described here, the glass case around the goblet would not have a top. In that case, players may not realize they have to unlock the case - they might think they're supposed to reach in from the top and grab the goblet. Is there a way you could close the case, and still allow it to retract when the game is won? Otherwise, is there a way you could show the players that they can't just reach in from the top? Maybe the case itself has lasers in it and the button turns off the lasers?

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Reviewer 3:

I like the dramatic effect of the glass lowering to reveal the goblet, but what about the top of the glass box? Maybe it would be easier to make one of the sides a door that can swing open once the puzzle is solved.

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Reviewer 4:

You could have spent more time on sketching the pedestal. I would have liked to see some shading on the actual pedestal and also the glass covering it.

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Reviewer 5:

Using the pedestal as the central communication point for the room is logical, and the retracting glass case is a nice positive confirmation for the room's participants that they have successfully completed the task that the room requires.

One instinctive reaction that the room's participants may have after the glass retracts is to try and pull it off the stand. It's probably pretty easy to make the goblet durable enough that this isn't a problem (e.g., just bolt it to the pedestal), but it's worth keeping in mind.

It would also be nice if there were some audible confirmation that the participants had completed the room in addition to the visual of the glass retracting.

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Sketching technique, clarity of storyboard and concept sketches, and their web presentation

Client 1:

Nice sketches, and clear! Maybe direct more of your text with notes that point to areas of the drawing instead of just above and below.

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Client 2:

As I said above, I clearly understood your sketches and explanations, even when they were conveying non-trivial ideas. Thank you! The one request I would make is to be able to access your storyboard and concept sketches from a single webpage, so I don't have to go back to the [url] page to get from one to the other.

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Reviewer 3:

While I appreciate the photos of the walls, it would have been nice to see how you would conceptualize the decor instead of grabbing photos from somewhere else.

There wasn't much of a storyboard, so I can't really comment on that. The website is pretty straightforward and clean. I liked the sketches of the pedestal and the buttons, I just wish there was more of it.

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Reviewer 4:

I don't think a lot of the sketching techniques we learned in class were used, especially shading and tone. The two separate pages of the website weren't linked together so it was a little annoying to go back to the course website and click on the separate pages.

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Reviewer 5:

Overall, I think the combination of text and sketches did a pretty good job of explaining the various components of the room. I do think it would help to try and pay closer attention to a couple of the technical aspects of two-point perspective that we learned. In particular, the room appeared to apply foreshortening in the wrong direction, and the pedestal was missing the back edges despite the fact that it appeared to be below the horizon. Still, the sketches were executed well enough for the sake of communication.

I really liked how you managed to integrate the picture of a baroque style room with your sketches - it gave a very clear picture of what you want the ultimate room to look like!

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