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Concept Sketch Reviews
Home > Assignments > Concept sketch results > Reviews for Jana Saadi

Jana Saadi
team ark
[review]

StoryboardConcept Sketches
 Gumball Track Tilt Table Maze Rotating Circles Track Completing Track Presentation
Average Rating
 
Client 1:
Client 2:
Reviewer 3:
Reviewer 4:
Reviewer 5:
1-marginal     2-ok    3-good     4-very good    5-outstanding

Storyboard Gumball Track: innovativeness and potential

Client 1:

I think this could be developed into a workable game. I'm a big fan of Rube Goldberg-esque displays, so I like the concept behind this. A few things pop out at me:

- There will need to be a mechanism that reloads the gumballs back into the machine (or if the machine is hidden/nonexistent, back to the starting point). I would see if you can show that to the visitors, because marble escalators look really cool.

- If you give a visitor access to a ball, s/he will throw it. Your instincts about restricting access to the maze(s) were good.

- Most of these concepts are restricted to just one wall. That's a lot of space in the room that you're not using. Think about how you might expand the game to involve more of the room. (Maybe the maze extends down from the wall across a large, slanted table to continue the marble run?)

- In your designs, consider that the gumballs will inevitably get stuck somewhere along the path. It's preferable if you have a solution to this that doesn't involve venue staff going in to fix the problem manually.

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Client 2:

This looks like an experience with a very intuitive goal, and a very interesting/fun look and feel. The pressure of the ticking time clock will be great!

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Reviewer 3:

A giant gumball machine would be nostalgic and colorful for the room! Fun idea to play "Plinko" with gumballs (from the price-is-right game show).

Sugarland is a great play on candyland as well! Really like this whole concept.

I like the idea of each player getting a gumball after completing the game as well - seems only fair :)

How did you think about making sure the color matched the drop position? A color sensor / matching sensor could be used at each hole location.

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Reviewer 4:

The Gumball Track game is innovative and fun! I was somewhat confused by how the rotating knob and timer really work. An audible (tic-toc) and/or visual (countdown) queue would probably work better than the receding knob. I also wonder how the track design task could be more clearly prompted. Maybe it could be staged? The first move might be a rotating circles step to get the ball closer to another section that has the more involved track design task? Staging might also be a way of including a combination of the track design tasks and involve more of the players at once.

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Reviewer 5:

I really like this game! It has the potential to engage all of the players in the group and involves some reasoning. I'm not sure that a timer is the best way to judge if the team wins the room or not, unless you can very well control how long it takes the gumball to get to the exit. I don't think players will focus so much on the most efficient path to get the gumball down to the right exit hole as they will just focus on getting the gumball to the right exit and it would be really frustrating to get the gumball into the right hole but not win the room. It'd be worth it to think about other ways to implement failure, maybe something like requiring players to get three gumballs in the correct holes in a row or using paths only a certain amount of times.

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Potential, feasibility, user experience and human factors shown in the concept sketch, Tilt Table Maze

Client 1:

This is not my favorite of your concepts. I think it's going to be easy to break and that it has too many loose parts, along with not being easily resettable or score-able. I get the idea, but the execution does not really fit the Open World parameters.

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Client 2:

A tilting maze sounds fun! Very easy to understand the goal, but could be made difficult enough to be a real challenge under time pressure! This looks feasible to construct.

The design still needs a solution to the problem of partially completed games. If a groups fails and leaves, how do you ensure there are no gumballs left in the maze? Perhaps the maze floor could be dropped and tilted to remove leftover balls?

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Reviewer 3:

It's very clear what the user is supposed to do with the tilt table - get the gumball through the maize. It's also avoiding people coming in contact with the gumballs and trying to eat part of the game!

How it's drawn, all colored gumballs would need to go to the same place (the center), hence, all the gumballs could take the same route - until they reach the cetner. It'd be better if each color had a different position to drop in the maize.

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Reviewer 4:

The tilt table maze seems like a more enclosed option when compared to the Completing Track Design which is a big plus for durability and resetability. The gumball entrance path for a suspended tilt table seems challenging as it could easily break off. A well-attached, flexible hose coupled to a table that cannot tilt too heavily might solve this issue. In general, a maze seems like an easy challenge to solve unless the motion of the table is stopped or a force is exerted occasionally. Another option is to have more than one gumball at once and requiring that all gumballs fall into the appropriate hole in order to succeed. In that scenario it might not make sense to have all the holes in the same location.

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Reviewer 5:

This is super cool and I think it would be a ton of fun to play! It's great that the balls are completely enclosed, so that self resetting is easy. If it was really as large as shown, it would involve everyone in the group. It would be interesting to incorporate some more challenging elements, such as additional holes that would lead to failure or having multiple balls released at once. Incorporating it into the floor is a great idea and would make it more physical.

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Potential, feasibility, user experience and human factors shown in the concept sketch, Rotating Circles Track

Client 1:

This is your best variation, I think. I could see this being a lot of fun with a speed/dexterity mode, where you can barely keep up with the number of gumballs dropped into the maze. I also like that it requires a lot of teamwork and communication between group members.

If you can figure out how to expand this past just one wall, I think this could be a really good Open World activity.

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Client 2:

This looks very fun, and could be made to require many players coordinating well to get balls dropped in time. This design looks very feasible and reliable. Perhaps the expense of a giant clear panel can be skipped by using clear pipes instead of channels to route the balls?

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Reviewer 3:

The circle track seems a little easy to complete to me. How could you add more difficulty to the maize?

It'd be cool if the specific color ball was shown and you had to set the positions of the track before the ball comes into the maize. The positions that you set would need to be very quickly made and it would require a number of people to move multiple locations of the circles. Also, instead of having four quadrants that are all the same, it could be just a slide through or a block to the side type of set up.

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Reviewer 4:

Rotating circles seems like a more enclosed option when compared to the Completing Track design. This might make it a more implementable/safer/easily resettable option in our design environment. Although it is not mentioned, the circles could be actuated such that the game is not automatically solved if there was a successful team with color A and the following team also gets a color A gumball. I would encourage the design of other rotating circles (other than the four port circles) such that some of the path/color combinations are rendered impossible, and there is more variety/challenge in the game.

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Reviewer 5:

This is also a great idea for the track. It is entirely self-contained, so self-resetting would be easy. It seems rather easy to implement (beside planning out the maze). As with the tilting table, it would be interesting to incorporate more failure features that would be a challenge for teams to keep it away from.

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Potential, feasibility, user experience and human factors shown in the concept sketch, Completing Track

Client 1:

This could be cool, but I think that a tilt table that is heavy enough to require two people to move will make for very frustrating gameplay, especially with the complexity of the maze you've sketched. It also presents a problem for when groups are unsuccessful - how do you remove that gumball before the next group comes in?

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Client 2:

This looks fun to build, but poses a few major issues. How do guests know which color ball is coming, in order to build the correct track? Is there an "on deck circle" where players can see the next ball to drop?

Preventing players from simply picking up the balls may be difficult with this design. Maybe the track pieces need to be inserted through a clear front sheet? Maybe they are permanently mounted through a clear sheet, but are weighted to pivot vertically unless manipulated from the front?

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Reviewer 3:

I like the easy track set-up! But this would be difficult to avoid gumballs all over the floor and people trying to eat the gumballs (which I assume are not edible).

Maybe the track can be behind a plexiglass wall and positioned with a few control rods that control multiple tracks on either side of the room?

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Reviewer 4:

The completing track concept seems highly implementable (mimics the gear game previously developed by 2.744 students). I think this could work well other than the possibility of having the balls and track parts ending outside the floor immediately below the gumball exit. The parts also seem small and easy to break and loose. Heavy, thick parts in a large track board might solve some of these issues.

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Reviewer 5:

I like the interactive nature of this implementation, in that track path is completely determined by the players. The self resetting mechanism of the tracks is nice and very feasible. However, this is my least favorite implementation of the wall, mostly because it would be hard to make it self-resetting if the balls were to fall out of the tracks.

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Sketching technique, clarity of storyboard and concept sketches, and their web presentation

Client 1:

Very nice production value in your sketches. I liked your use of color and shading. Well done!

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Client 2:

These ideas are communicated clearly and it's easy to imagine the guest experience after viewing them.

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Reviewer 3:

The presentation was very clear. Easy to navigate site, easy to read, and fun to think about how it could be implemented.

I thought the concept sketches could have been a little more detailed in their presentation. I do really like the fog for the clear covering - Way to use the chalk given out in class!

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Reviewer 4:

The site is easy to follow and navigate. I am not a fan of the color scheme and think it could more closely match the gumball theme (red, blue, green colors, chubbier font). Consider changing the concept sketch links to shift the window over to a location strictly prior to the concept sketch names in order to confirm that you have arrived to the correct location.

Jana utilizes the shading and sketching techniques learned in class proficiently throughout the site. The gumball exit holes on circle track seem tilted. Was this the objective? I am also confused by whether they lie inside the wall or in front of the track surface. I believe it should be the latter, so the hole gumball hole section should be placed on the plane of the floor, which would also fix the tilting issue. Neat use of shading to convey the glass enclosure in the Titling Maze concept sketch!

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Reviewer 5:

Overall, this website and content is really well done. The website layout presents the content clearly and it is easy to navigate with the navigation bar. The concept sketches incorporate techniques we learned in class and are annotated to give good details. The only small improvement that might be nice to include would be a "go to top" button for the bottom of the pages so that you can get back up to the navigation bar.

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