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Concept Sketch Reviews
Home > Assignments > Concept sketch results > Reviews for Julia Wong

Julia Wong
tinkerdoodles
[review]

StoryboardConcept Sketches
 Hatshepsut Returns Shaking Sarcophagus Hieroglyphics Puzzle Guardian Gods Presentation
Average Rating
 
Client 1:
Client 2:
Reviewer 3:
Reviewer 4:
Reviewer 5:
1-marginal     2-ok    3-good     4-very good    5-outstanding

Storyboard Hatshepsut Returns: innovativeness and potential

Client 1:

I'm a bit confused about how the group would know to clap the 3 statues at the same time. I really like the experience of having the sarcophagus rumble and shake. I think that's fun.

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Client 2:

I like that you have an effect happening after the players win the room. I also appreciate that you used Hatshepsut instead of Tut or some other dude pharaoh.

The challenge of this room is to figure out what to do in it, so you might not need the coffin to rumble to get the players' attention (because it's ok if a group fails a couple of times before they succeed). If you test it and find out that a lot of people never figure out what they're supposed to do, then it's worth putting the rumble in.

Since the cartouches below the coffin dim immediately when a player takes their hand away, players might think they have to keep their hand on the cartouches while they do whatever else they need to do to win the game. This isn't a problem with a group of 5 or 6, but could be a problem with a smaller group. Keeping the cartouches lit once they've been touched will show players that it's ok to let go of them.

I don't know how many people know how to read the direction of a cartouche, but players might notice that the "outside symbol" (cartouche) is flipped on the statues, so they might put together that the symbols on the statues have to go the other way. But, they also might not notice. Another thing you'd have to test to make sure that people figure it out eventually, even if it's not the first time they enter the room.

I don't understand the players touching the statues' hands, because in the first drawing of statues, they don't have hands. Was that just something you didn't draw, or does the player have to do something to get the hands in the first place?

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Reviewer 3:

Does the sarcophagus begin to move after a set time, or does this happen only when someone goes near it? What are the fail conditions? As of now, it seems like there is just a desire to search the room. Are people trying to awaken HATSHEPSUT or is the idea to escape her? Also I'm not entirely sure if clapping to activate the statues will necessarily be intuitive.

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Reviewer 4:

I liked this storyboard for several reasons. First, the ancient egypt tomb atmosphere is probably very doable and easily simulated in the escape room setting; 2.5D FX will go a long way and the square rooms will also be put to use well. I also liked the haptic feedback of the sarcophagus and how people can see it light up. It seems like a nice gag that is not easily broken by users since a plexiglass or similar protector would hide the electronics while delivering the effect. One aspect I wasn't sure about was the "winning" of the game. Do you want the mummy to come to life? It seemed scary to win! :)

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Reviewer 5:

Really great ideas! I like the variety of puzzles the player must complete and the different visual clues letting them know they're headed in the right direction. Does clapping hands with the statues open the sarcophagus? I think that one might be a bit difficult unless there is some guidance when clapping the hands individually, but otherwise I like the how immersive the theme is.

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Potential, feasibility, user experience and human factors shown in the concept sketch, Shaking Sarcophagus

Client 1:

Nice design! I think this could work. I like the idea, and think it would be fun.

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Client 2:

You explained how you would make the movement happen and what the guests would see, which is awesome! I am not an engineer so I can't comment on the feasibility of it other than to say that the springs would wear out eventually, so you'd have to get springs that take a while to wear out, and keep a schedule so you know when to replace them.

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Reviewer 3:

The shaking mechanism is a good way to draw the attention to the sarcophagus and make it the point of attention in the room. While feasible, when implementing, keep in mind how this may affect the people around the sarcophagus. As in makes sure if someone is already there, that the shaking won't potentially hurt them.

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Reviewer 4:

The shaking mechanism is cool. My one concern is if an enthusiastic guest sits on top of it; will it bear their weight? I would also add several more springs (more than 4) to support the sarcophagus. Visually, the effects of this would be very impressive, I think. Only thing is how would assembly be in terms of feasibility? Can this be installed in a few hours by a team? Great sketch!

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Reviewer 5:

Interesting idea to use, and seems feasible. My only concern is how it will work with a very heavy lid, which I imagine this will be in order to avoid damage and destruction from guests trying to pry it open.

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Potential, feasibility, user experience and human factors shown in the concept sketch, Hieroglyphics Puzzle

Client 1:

Those are lots of little LEDS! That's my only concern with this idea. There's a lot of wiring and a lot of control.

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Client 2:

The way that you've done the puzzle here, there need to be a lot of individual LEDs and sensors. The more tech you have in a room, the more likely something in the room is going to break, so you should think about ways you could reduce the amount of sensors required.

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Reviewer 3:

The implementation seems light the set-up will work well. To provide greater variety, you may want to use the micro controller to randomize which hieroglyphics become the "right" ones for each round. This way it increases the repeatability.

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Reviewer 4:

I think the hieroglyphics puzzle is a nice balance of cool effects and a robust design that will withstand the most abusive guests. It seems like you have hidden the electronics inside the sarcophagus so that the only slapping and other contact the device will receive is through a translucent protective sheet of material. Hieroglyphics as a choice were great because as opposed to a modern language, anyone can identify matching geometries so the bandwidth for skill level is pretty wide. I wonder how this can be made more difficult; maybe more colors?

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Reviewer 5:

I really like this one, and think the different colored LEDs are a nice touch and will be visually interesting. I'm not sure many people will get the clue regarding the direction the glyphs face and the direction they should be read in but I guess part of the point is for the puzzle to be tough to figure out.

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Potential, feasibility, user experience and human factors shown in the concept sketch, Guardian Gods

Client 1:

Cool! This is a nice sketch. The infinity mirror would be cool. Make sure to make them at the right height.

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Client 2:

I like the addition of the infinity mirror eyes, which are more interesting than regular lights-behind-glass would have been. For the three statues that the players have to touch, maybe think about lighting up their eyes when the hand is touched, regardless of if the other hands are currently being touched, and then dimming the eyes if the player walks away. That way, when a player walks up to the first statue that they have to touch and touches it, the player gets feedback that they are going in the right direction. You can have the coffin-opening effect when all three hands are touched at the same time.

(The only downside is that people might be able to figure out what to do by just going around and touching every statue's hands, instead of reading the cartouches. Something to think about. So don't just do this because I suggested it, I might be making it too easy.)

Also, you might not need a proximity sensor. I believe there are touch-capacitive sensors that go off when someone touches it, because skin can conduct electricity and skin contact completes a circuit. Could also be useful for the cartouches on the coffin.

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Reviewer 3:

This adds a very interesting effect which definitely makes the game more fun and rewarding when solving the puzzle. You may want to come up with a way to make sure someone doesn't accidentally activate the statue simply by standing too close to it.

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Reviewer 4:

I thought the fathomless mirror eyes were particularly cool concept. I'd be very interested in seeing these implemented in real life which made the youtube link you included very nice to complement the sketch. I also think this type of effects can be modular, so the eyes can be re-used on a different set after the ancient egypt room is retired. Minimal assembly would be required, so this is ideal in terms of feasibility. Considering it draws the eyes of the users naturally, it could also be used as a signal or a form of feedback to light up based on progression through the room.

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Reviewer 5:

As I said in the storyboard review, I think there should be some kind of clue to help people figure out what to do. Also, some kind of pressure sensor might be better or easier than a proximity sensor, but just a thought!

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Sketching technique, clarity of storyboard and concept sketches, and their web presentation

Client 1:

Nice sketches! This looks really great. Nice work.

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Client 2:

Awesome awesome awesome

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Reviewer 3:

The web presentation was nicely done. Everything was nicely detailed and explained how each part would come into effect for the gameplay. Also the videos were a nice touch to add as proof of concept.

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Reviewer 4:

The storyboard was well done; the tone and colors were minimal and each scene was simple such that it was very clear where I should direct my attention in each block. Similarly, the concept sketches were well articulated with descriptions and also Youtube links that described the practical implementation of the gag were helpful to see the sketch in real life. The website had no bugs and it was easy to understand the flow and the different sections.

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Reviewer 5:

Incredible drawings, love the website design, everything is super clear and easy to understand. Really hard to give much feedback or critique because I think it's great!

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