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Natasha Wright
5 Wits First Dates
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 game scalingwheelchair accessibilityproblem solved indicatorPresentation
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Reviewer 1:
Reviewer 2:
Client 3:
Reviewer 4:
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game scaling concept sketch comments

Reviewer 1:

While the essential idea of scaling the shape of the arrow to require more tiles addresses the problem adequately, I feel that the proximity of the tiles still limit the scaling of these particular pattern.

From your storyboard, it seems that the players need to stay on the panels to keep them activated. In your next sketch, you indicate that these panels are a little under 3 feet by 3 feet: This means that most users can easily

stand in 2 tiles, and possibly stretch over 3.

This idea would scale well if people agreed to only stand on one panel each. However, it could be possible that 3 players could easily stretch out to accomplish the task designed for 9 players, leaving 6 players out.

Making a pattern that was more spread out (especially for the larger groups) could alleviate this problem: ie. illuminating every other

panel in a line, so one person cannot easily occupy 2 panels.

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Reviewer 2:

The good side of the design is that it does not change too much of the user exprience while accommodating different group size at the same time. Sensor may need to be installed at the entrance of the room to count the number of people.

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Client 3:

Really, really great that you are thinking out these issues!

Scaling for group size is a challenge, for sure.

Generally, the show doesn't know many people are in the group (that is not keyed in anywhere).

But the game could take a guess based on how many tiles it sees activated before the game begins or something like that.

Having a few extra tiles in the game wouldn't be a bad thing, as they are all adjacent to each other, guests can easily step on two at a time, if not more.

So I'd lean toward having too many, rather than too few.

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Reviewer 4:

not so sure on implementation, will see with regard to scale, however there are exceptionally well drawn elements here easily conveyed.

This holds true for all of the following concepts as well.

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wheelchair accessibility concept sketch comments

Reviewer 1:

I enjoyed the sketch of the wheelchair!

First, I'm not sure if you panels are large enough. A quick google search showed that while the width of the wheelchais about 30 inches, the length closer to 45 inches:

http://www.ada.gov/reg3a/figA3.htm

Would your tiles be large enough to ensure that a wheelchair user

does not accidentally activate an incorrect tile? If they were made larger

to 45 by 45 inches, would the game still work well (fitting in the room, possible to play with any number of people)?

Lastly, while this sketch addresses the problem of a wheelchair potentially "fitting" onto a tile, does it really solve the larger problem: is this game going to be enjoyable for people in wheelchairs? How are wheelchair users going to move around on the tiles? Does this spacing ensure that the users will feel nimble enough to contribute to the solution, rather than feeling like they are "getting in people's way"

A sketch indicating this "flow", showing how a wheelchair user would be able to move around on the panels and interact with the others in the group, would be very helpful in explaining this solution better.

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Reviewer 2:

very considerate in including the people using wheel chairs. simple and implementable design.

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Client 3:

Outstanding to be considering ADA standards at this early stage.

30"x30" is a pretty big tile.

Could a wheelchair span two adjacent tiles?

A room size of 20'x20' is a bit large for our adventures -- I would estimate a size of roughly 300 square feet, in either a square or rectangular configuration.

Ramps need to be 1 foot long for every 1" of rise in the floor -- which can often be a prohibitive design factor.

This means the floor should be kept as low as possible.

Under 1" would be wonderful, under 2" acceptable. Higher than that starts to cause real problems, with ramps required at every fire exit from the show, etc.

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Reviewer 4:

not so sure on implementation, will see with regard to scale, however there are exceptionally well drawn elements here easily conveyed.

This holds true for all of the following concepts as well.

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problem solved indicator concept sketch comments

Reviewer 1:

I think this is a good indicator of the finished problem.

Other cool affects would be having the lit panels flash. You already have the infrastructure for all these lit panels, its worth having them flash and make sounds as well with the lasers.

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Reviewer 2:

A row of lasers do create a 'wow' effect. However, with a wall of lasers in front the users, the users may not think they should pass through it and it may even make me feel it is not the right direction. The open door do give user the right direction. Is it better if the complete 'arrow' blinks to indicate the problem is solved.

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Client 3:

Great thinking, and lasers are always cool.

I bet you will be able to do cool things with the lights in the floor to indicate success without needed a separate system.

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Reviewer 4:

not so sure on implementation, will see with regard to scale, however there are exceptionally well drawn elements here easily conveyed.

This holds true for all of the following concepts as well.

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Overall concept sketch clarity and presentation

Reviewer 1:

All sketches were very easy to figure out.

Nothing was ambiguous.

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Reviewer 2:

The sketches are clear and present the ideas well without even refering to the word explanations. The website is intuitive to navigate.

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Client 3:

Great sketches, clear presentation of ideas, I love the way you are thinking.

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Reviewer 4:

As Noted, exceptional work on the artwork, well conveyed.

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