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Home > Assignments > Concept sketch results > Reviews for Pushpaleela Prabakar

Pushpaleela Prabakar
she wolf
[review]

StoryboardConcept Sketches
 Power Outage in Cyberspace Capacitors Life-size Solderboard Capacitor on Solderboard Presentation
Average Rating
 
Client 1:
Client 2:
Reviewer 3:
Reviewer 4:
Reviewer 5:
1-marginal     2-ok    3-good     4-very good    5-outstanding

Storyboard Power Outage in Cyberspace: innovativeness and potential

Client 1:

We've seen a lot of "place the components" games. To be a good representative of that genre, the game has to offer something more than just solving a jigsaw puzzle (component A goes in slot A, etc). I think you can do something similar to the fuses game in 5 Wits Espionage, where the value of the capacitor is a key factor in placement. Even with that addition, this is still not my favorite kind of game because the focus is on the puzzle pieces and not on the environment.

Also consider that players won't be able to "find the components around the room" because after the first group, the components will be left in the puzzle board.

I think putting an exercise bike in the room as a gameplay element very much limits the user experience. Only one person can ride at a time, and even if you put six bikes in, it changes how a two-person group experiences the room. I'm not really clear on the value of the bikes, except as a mechanism to force visitors to move. You could replace the whole physical activity component with a single pushbutton and not much would change.

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Client 2:

This concept has some fun physical elements that are a unique way for guests to "input" their answer. Most games have a 'push a button'. Riding a bike and using your feet is very original.

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Reviewer 4:

i think that this idea is good as it involves both a physical challenge as well as a puzzle solving one. I think that from your storyboard it wasn't clear that the capacitors where there all along and didn't just appear. I think also many people may not know what a capacitor does and how it can be used to power the generator, maybe by changing it to power boosters that need to be put in the right order would help close this gap of knowledge. I think that this idea is very feasible and has potential but could use a little work. Also I think thinking about what kind of theme the room would have is important too. This wasn't super clear in you storyboard. Maybe making it a exercise room in space or something like that.

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Reviewer 5:

I'm not sure I understand this room. For one, the presence of the bike and foot pedal seem pretty random and arbitrary, and the juxtaposition of having this human sized objects and the huge capacitors seems like it'll just break the immersion. Are the players on a circuit board as the caps would suggest? Maybe replace the bike/pedal with more direct connections to the circuit world; perhaps have them push electron-like balls around a loop.

Another question I have is the capacitors themselves; I don't think 5 wits is going to like having objects which can be accidentally taken out of the room. Could you find someway to implement the same general idea without the caps being removable?

Also, from a electrical engineering perspective, this room would confuse me. Adding just caps like this to the circuit would cause a real life circuit to have current phase shift and actually reduce the average power delivered to the load. You could find a similar game with combinations of inductors and capacitors and have the players have to find some way to lay them out on the circuit board to get only resistive impedance (power factor of 1), so that the game agrees with actual circuit design, if you so desire. Most people wouldn't really care or know the difference though.

A real life polarized capacitor would be destroyed if put in a circuit the wrong way. Could you maybe give some visual clues about the correct polarity and make them putting it in the wrong way an instant fail? It might raise the stakes and make it a bit more challenging than just a 50/50 shot of getting it the right way first time.

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Potential, feasibility, user experience and human factors shown in the concept sketch, Capacitors

Client 1:

These look like normal capacitors to me. You might want to consider the durability of these elements. Even at a large scale, consider how thin those pins are in relation to the capacitor body size. Think about how you might change these so the conductors are supported at both ends.

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Client 2:

What are these made out of? Are they durable? How will the show control determine which one is which?

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Reviewer 3:

I like how there are three types of capacitors used, and the board lighting up is a good visual feedback method. I think there is potential (lol) making three life sized electrical components, and I think the circuit could be made more complex if desired.

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Reviewer 4:

I think that it it is good you are thinking about different designs for the different capacitors. Maybe each different one has a different power ratings and needs to be placed in a different way. I think that making these is very feasible and thinking about how the user will interact with them and pick and place them is important. Maybe there is a specific shape that is easier to carry or place or maybe one type looks more powerful than the other etc. I think you can play with these tings and test things out.

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Reviewer 5:

From a user experience perspective, I think the huge capacitors could be quite cool. I know I used to find all kinds of electronic stuff completely magic, so having the players put these things on the circuit boards could definitely make them feel like powerful electronic geniuses!

From a technology perspective, this is definitely feasible. It wouldn't be too hard to do this with diodes/resistors and a little current sensor in the board, so just a few dollars per capacitor.

That being said, the implementation of the caps needs some thought as I mentioned above. People would intentionally/unintentionally take them from the room, and that would ruin the whole thing. Like I said above, maybe some way to move them around on the board rather than placing them would work better.

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Potential, feasibility, user experience and human factors shown in the concept sketch, Life-size Solderboard

Client 1:

There's not much detail here for me to go on. Will the puzzle be displayed on the board with static graphics or with some digital output? What is the scale of this board in relation to the room? Have you given any thought to what type of sensor you will need to detect the different types of capacitors?

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Client 2:

How does the show sense when a capacitor is in place? How is a guest suppose to know which one goes where? Are they guessing or is logic involved?

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Reviewer 3:

As mentioned before, I think the lighting is a good way to give positive visual feedback.

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Reviewer 4:

I think that it is very feasible to make a life size soldiering board. I think that you would need a lot more holes in the board then your sketch shows, otherwise it may be to easy to figure out how the capacitors go into the board as there are less possible combinations. I think that having not too small of holes is important so that it is easy to place the capacitors. I think that this is definitely possible and able to be implemented.

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Reviewer 5:

I like the general concept of the putting the capacitors on the board, although I think the implementation here could be improved to make the piece more immersive. Maybe large red/green LEDs on the board could light up rather than arbitrary circles around the leads. More objects on the board, vias, traces, silkscreen, etc. could help to make the user experience more representative of an actual board as well (although this might have been left off for drawing's sake).

Generally though, as I mentioned with the capacitor, the idea is definitely feasible and has potential to be pretty fun.

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Potential, feasibility, user experience and human factors shown in the concept sketch, Capacitor on Solderboard

Client 1:

Are you planning on indicating the polarity of the capacitors on the capacitors themselves, or is it simply a matter of trial and error?

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Client 2:

How does this game reset? When players enter a room, are the capacitors already in their proper places?

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Reviewer 3:

I think this concept isn't totally necessary and can be inferred from the first two. Still, I think the overall idea is solid, but I would have like to see a drawing of the foot pedal or bike.

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Reviewer 4:

I think that it is feasible and possible to put the life size capacitor into the board. I think that it may be hard if the capacitor is heavy or just very larger to place into the whole. May be cumbersome to lift such a large thing. I would also be careful to make them out of very string material and keep in mind that people may break them and they need to be tough and hold up to being bent etc.

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Reviewer 5:

This concept sketch is a purely combination of the first and second ones. My comments from both of those apply here as well.

Also, how will this be self resetting? Will certain holes turn red and those caps have to be turned around, or will they fall out between games? I think the idea where the caps have to be attached to the board somehow and rearranged would allow you to cycle between solutions for each reset.

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Sketching technique, clarity of storyboard and concept sketches, and their web presentation

Client 1:

Your webpage is pretty clean. In your concept sketches, I would pay closer attention to the two-point perspective technique and make sure it applies to all objects in your drawing, not just the focal point. In particular, I'm looking at the brown capacitor in your third sketch - it does not match the perspective of the solder board.

Also, consider how circles appear to change their shape when they are put into perspective. They gain eccentricity so that they look like ovals. This is part of what's throwing off the perspective of your solder board.

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Client 2:

The sketches could use more detail. The bike and foot pedal could have been added to the concept sketches.

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Reviewer 3:

Sketches are clear, just try to erase the construction lines a little more cleanly. Also, when going over them in sharpie, try to keep using a ruler to make sure the longer straight lines aren't wobbly. Nice use of 2 point perspective for the board though.

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Reviewer 4:

I think that your sketches could use some more shading and more complexity. Your storyboard doesn't really have any shading and it is hard to tell what is going on at times and the message isn't converted very clearly. I like that you included color in your sketches but you didn't really shade with the color you used. There are also a lot of places where things looks very uneven and not really realistic like the legs of the capacitors. There are also some places like the last capacitor, where I think you draw to the wrong vanishing point, and there are spots where you draw a line through things that should be in front (Drew a line through the legs of the resistor in the last sketch). It would also be nice if you erased the pencil marks.

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Reviewer 5:

The storyboard isn't really one-point perspective, although that's forgivable to an extent because I think it gets the point across. It's pretty clear to understand what is going on in the panels, and the handwriting is clear.

The concept sketches are fine and mostly a good execution of 2-point perspective, but I wish more detail went into them so that you could get a better idea of the user experience. Do the caps have different sized leads and can only fit into one set of holes, or does it not matter? Does the brown cap have different sets of leads then the other two? I think the ellipses of the circuit board are oriented on the wrong axis, or at least they look strange. A bit more detail and precision on the drawings could help to describe the immersion that you are aiming for.

The shading could also be improved to make the sketches really stand out. For example, the two thin sides of the circuit board are the same color, whereas one should be darker, and the cylindrical shading techniques could be applied to the leads of the cap.

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