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Concept Sketch Reviews
Home > Assignments > Concept sketch results > Reviews for Rima Das

Rima Das
team ark
[review]

StoryboardConcept Sketches
 Jellybean Rock Wall Stay on Your Color Twister Follow the Lights Presentation
Average Rating
 
Client 1:
Client 2:
Reviewer 3:
Reviewer 4:
Reviewer 5:
1-marginal     2-ok    3-good     4-very good    5-outstanding

Storyboard Jellybean Rock Wall: innovativeness and potential

Client 1:

This looks like a ton of fun. Good job linking the image of jelly beans to rock climbing holds.

Restricting the legal holds adds a fun element to this game. It's unclear exactly what the victory and loss conditions are from this storyboard. Do all group member need to make it to the top to win? I assume there's a time limit that causes you to fail as well?

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Client 2:

This sounds like a fun game to play. I can imagine there being a line outside this room in an Open World venue.

My general sense is that you could simplify your design and still retain much, if not all, of the fun in the game. I think it would be enough to have players traverse the room only touching a specified color without complicating matters with floor tiles and twister spinners. To make it a little more dynamic, you could have the specified color change every N seconds so that players would have to scramble for new handholds periodically.

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Reviewer 3:

This candy-themed rock wall seems like so much fun! I just have a couple of questions:

In terms of feasibility, how will you know if the person who stepped on the blue block only touched the blue holds? are they tagged somehow to their colour?

How will you indicate to the people that they have been kicked out of the room?

What are people trying to reach? Is it some sort of switch? If there's no goal and the room is short, people may think it's a bouldering situation. Some visual goal for the user would probably be ideal.

Does the room cycle through concepts or will it stick to one? It might be kind of fun where very time you fail one game you come into another one!

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Reviewer 4:

I think this game is simple enough to be easily understandable from a user point of view and it also fits your theme nicely. You should look into the max height available the rooms. I wasn't able to find any info online about it but it may limit your game if it isn't big enough. (If the wall is too short, it may not be challenging for people ages 15-35 years old). Also, consider safety. Your floor should be made of some rubber-like material in case people fall.

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Reviewer 5:

I like the combination of physical and mental challenge here. The aesthetic is also very cute and I could picture it being a very immersive room. I do kind of wish that the theme and the challenge were more linked, as is it kind of feels more like you've combined a challenge and an aesthetic. There is good potential here and I think this could be a very fun room.

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Potential, feasibility, user experience and human factors shown in the concept sketch, Stay on Your Color

Client 1:

This seems difficult to detect unless the climbers are on widely separated starting tiles without crossover paths. It would be difficult to tell if the "green" climber or "red" climber has just touched a certain hold if their paths overlap.

This could work if climbers went one at a time up the wall.

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Client 2:

As I said above, I think the floor tiles make this one too complicated. I think what I understand from your drawing is that each floor tile corresponds to a section of wall, and that section senses whether the player is on a specific color or not. Once on the wall, how do you detect the end of the game? Is it a win when all players are on their correct colors, or do they have to climb to the top, or is there another goal?

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Reviewer 3:

I think if you walk in and you step on a certain colour tile, e.g. red, it blinks twice and stays red, and the next tile you step on will turn red as well. This will give the users the ability to associate themselves with the colour that is produced when they walk.

I would like to understand the technical feasibility of detecting which user has touched which colour hold, especially on a multiple people context.

Is there a switch that the users have to click?

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Reviewer 4:

How will the user know when he/she is done with the game? Is the point to just climb up the wall without touching any colors that they are not supposed to touch? Or is the point to touch every single jelly bean of their color when climbing up? It would be cool if users have to press some sort of button or pull a lever located at the top of the jelly bean wall to open an exit to the room. How will the game know which user is stepping on a jelly bean of a certain color? Will the users have a designated spot on the wall to climb and that's how the game will know? Also, do all users have to complete the challenge in order to win? If so, how will the game know when this happens? I think a way to avoid cheating on this one would be by requiring all users to press a button at the top of their respective assigned climbing areas at the same time to open an exit. This idea may not be feasible depending on the size of the wall you have in mind. You could always build a smaller version and give the 5wits engineers instructions on how to scale it. The wall could work with force sensors and Arduino. e people fall.

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Reviewer 5:

This is my favorite variation of the room. I think it's the best balance of mental and physical challenge. It's not too convoluted nor is it too straightforward. My only concern is that it could be quite expensive to implement as there will be many sensors involved. In terms of human experience I think it involves a lot of teamwork, which I like a lot. One question I had was how are players supposed to know when to change colors? Is that up to them? This could be made more clear in the room.

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Potential, feasibility, user experience and human factors shown in the concept sketch, Twister

Client 1:

While it would be difficult to detect if groups were following the specific hand/foot instructions accurately, this concept seems very exciting.

Perhaps the colors can be changed for everybody at once? The spinner moves to red, and the whole group of climbers has x seconds to move all hands and feet to the red jellybeans. This way progress up the wall can be throttled for even skilled climbers, as they have to wait for the color of the next holds up to be called. There might be some nice laugh moment opportunities as well, as multiple climbers scramble for the same red hold.

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Client 2:

I think this could be turned into a pretty strong game. I would remove the player number assignment and have the team act as a group. I don't think you lose much by eliminating that complexity, and in any case, how would you know which player was touching a certain stone, and with which limb? It's enough to "listen" to all of the jellybeans on the wall and fail the group if anything outside of the specified color is being triggered.

I think this could be really cool if you cued each color via ambient lights in the room. It's subtle, but that can be good in an mystery challenge. After you figure it out, it becomes strength/dexterity.

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Reviewer 3:

This seems like a lot of fun, though the room would have to be quite large for this to work, it seems like multiple guests will be on the wall at the same time.

How many things would have to be done in order for the users to get out of the room?

How would the room self operate, or would you have to have someone there all the time?

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Reviewer 4:

The twister wheel looks cool, but it's not completely necessary. You could have an algorithm randomly generate colors behind the scenes and simply have the speaker call out the colors and players. This would simplify the engineering work and allow you to focus on the jelly bean wall and speaker. This would make the project more feasible, but if you guys have time you could include the wheel since it looks cool from a user point of view. Again, this idea may not be feasible depending on the size of the wall you have in mind.

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Reviewer 5:

This one is probably my least favorite of the three. It was a bit difficult to understand even as someone who was given "the answer" to this challenge and I wonder if it's be too difficult. Again, implementation might be difficult as it involves many sensors.

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Potential, feasibility, user experience and human factors shown in the concept sketch, Follow the Lights

Client 1:

Forcing climbers up a wall at a certain rate creates a nice sense of pressure and intensity. It may be difficult for climbers to see new holds by their feet.

Maybe not everybody climbs at once, so spotters can help the climbers with directions?

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Client 2:

This game looks like a lot of fun too. My one concern is that it seems to restrict the gameplay to one player at a time. If the jellybeans have to be touched sequentially, how/when do you start the next sequence to be sure that the first player can't backtrack to a better handhold that actually belongs to the following player's sequence?

A simplified version of this might be a rock wall where you can only touch the jellybeans while they're lit - but they fade out at intervals, making you move quickly across the wall so you don't get caught holding jellybeans too long.

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Reviewer 3:

Same as the previous ones, I just want to know how this room would operate without a man behind the scenes. Since there are such variation in people size (some folks are 5'1" and others might be 6'4") it might be hard to make sure there's an adequate level of challenge for all players.

Also, how does the game end? Is it when a player reaches the other side of the room? Are all people are on the walls at the same time?

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Reviewer 4:

I think this variation of the rock wall is the most intuitive and feasible of the three variations. By having the jelly-beans light up, players will easily learn what the rules of the game are. You would only have to focus on building the wall which is nice from a feasibility point of view. But like I said before, this idea may not be feasible depending on the size of the wall you have in mind.

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Reviewer 5:

His reminds me of a previous 2.009 project. It seems very intuitive and really fun to do. There is less of a mental challenge here, but still has a good teamwork factor depending on how he jellybeans light up.

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Sketching technique, clarity of storyboard and concept sketches, and their web presentation

Client 1:

These ideas are presented in a clear and visually interesting way.

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Client 2:

Beautiful sketches. I got a clear impression of your vision for the room. Your different gray values were distinct enough to convey the impression of a bright, colorful room, even with no color on the sketch. Nicely done!

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Reviewer 3:

The sketches communicated Rima's ideas clearly. The web presentation is functional, but basic.

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Reviewer 4:

Both your concept sketches and storyboard sketches were easy to understand. The shading on your jelly beans in your concept sketches helped me see that they were 3D, and you did a nice job using different shades of grey to represent different colors. The only thing I would suggest is using color pencil in your concept sketches to show the actual colors you meant to represent (like red). Your website was easy to navigate, and everything was presented clearly and big enough to read.

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Reviewer 5:

Your sketches were very well drawn and clear. The website has a nice background color to compliment the theme as well. The use of two point perspective was well executed.

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