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Concept Sketch Reviews
Home > Assignments > Concept sketch results > Reviews for Ruben Peinado

Ruben Peinado
the remainders
[review]

StoryboardConcept Sketches
 Stealing the museums artifact Control station Rotational spring lever Pushable wall column Presentation
Average Rating
 
Client 1:
Client 2:
Reviewer 3:
Reviewer 4:
Reviewer 5:
1-marginal     2-ok    3-good     4-very good    5-outstanding

Storyboard Stealing the museums artifact: innovativeness and potential

Reviewer 3:

The experience presented in a gem heist room would be really fun and there are a lot of potential components that could be incorporated. However, as this storyboard is presented, I am a little confused about the sequence of tasks that the guests have to complete in order to win the room. Will each set of players be able to pick which two alarms they turn off via the the control board or will it always be the same for all games? If this is the case, it would be nice see how the guests would interact with all possible alarms in the storyboard. It seems a little complicated though - maybe it would be better to have one or two main alarms that involve more team work or finding a code or pattern to turn off. Another element that is not clear - besides the police alarms at the end, is there a time limit for the entire room? Additionally, to better understand the game, it'd be really valuable to include a panel showing how the entire room would look to the guests.

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Reviewer 4:

Your sketches of the control board in act 2 and the crank in act 4 are awesome! I also like the aspect of using lights and sounds to indicate a failure, but it may be a little confusing to guests if this is also the way of indicating the success. You can probably use the police lights for both, but maybe have different sounds, or have a radio that says 'the thieves got away, go find them' if they won, or something like 'oops you got caught' if they loose (obviously come up with something better than that lol). I think, in general, the guests will intuitively understand what they have to do, and while it isn't a particularly difficult task, there's a degree of physicality that will make it enjoyable to most players. Overall, I like the potential here!

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Reviewer 5:

This looks like a fun game with an interesting interaction between team members to succeed. I'm assuming that the different mechanisms will not have any effect until the preceding step is successfully completed.

My one suggestion would be to make the artifact non-removable. Perhaps just touching it will let the team win. While it wouldn't be like a real museum heist, it would prevent players from leaving it off the pedestal and make resetting the game easier.

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Potential, feasibility, user experience and human factors shown in the concept sketch, Control station

Client 1:

People love fiddling with levers and buttons, so this would be a fun way to start the room. As I said above, I don't know that we could actually install so many different "alarm types" in the room, but maybe you could have the guests use the control panel for something else? Like decreasing the sensitivity of a single alarm before they move through the room? I dunno, but there's probably a bunch of things you could do.

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Client 2:

Nice sketch. Can probably be made from purchased parts. This will probably feel interesting and futuristic.

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Reviewer 3:

This control station looks really cool and the amount of buttons/levers would definitely make people want to play around with it to figure out what it does. I'm interested to know how each alarm is deactivated and how you will implement it - does each one have a different pattern of lever movements/buttons? It'd be interesting to have the buttons and levers be located further apart so that one person alone cannot disengage the alarms.

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Reviewer 4:

As I mentioned above, I really like the sketch! I think it would be a good way of allowing the users to interact with the room, and could be potentially used as a failure mechanism as well (push the wrong button, and you lose kind of thing). I think there's a lot of potential here to make this an easy or a more challenging puzzle depending on what works best for users, and has potential to be an interesting gag to explore.

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Reviewer 5:

The control station concept makes a lot of sense to me. The levers and buttons seem intuitive. Maybe the screen can give the players feedback when they are close to the right combination.

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Potential, feasibility, user experience and human factors shown in the concept sketch, Rotational spring lever

Client 1:

As I explained, you can't have guests actually take the artifact from the pedestal, because they definitely wouldn't give it back. This is a good mechanic, though. You can definitely use it if you think of a different thing for it to do (rather than disengaging the artifact from the pedestal). I appreciate that you explained how you expect it to work.

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Client 2:

Also a nice input. I would look around for purchased parts in addition to something you would buy. Check out Suzohapp.com for a "one armed bandit". It's the lever for a slot machine, but might work great for this!

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Reviewer 3:

While this is a nice interactive feature and seems on the simpler side to implement, I don't think it is as enticing to players if it stands on its own (as it is shown in the storyboard) and only needs to be held for an action to happen. Maybe something more like a safe lock (or a game involving multiple of these mechanisms), where there is also some code breaking involved, would be more exciting.

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Reviewer 4:

Again, nice sketch. I think that you could actually do a lot with this and make it a lot more than just a handle on a wall. You could potentially have to turn it one way, and then another, and then back the first way to disengage the locks. You could also maybe put the lever part somewhere else in the room, and the guests have to first find it and then put in place before turning it. I think there's a lot of potential here beyond what is just in the storyboard, and might be worth exploring at more complex levels.

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Reviewer 5:

I like how the lever is spring loaded to allow for easier reset. However, it seems a bit simple to figure out. I'm wondering if there's a way to combine the lever with some other mechanism to make the puzzle slightly harder to solve.

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Potential, feasibility, user experience and human factors shown in the concept sketch, Pushable wall column

Client 1:

I like that the column has to stay pushed in or the case goes down again - it makes the players in the room work together to do whatever the next step is. I also think it would be satisfying to push a big column like this, more than an average button.

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Client 2:

This once seems interesting. It would be a cool input and simple to make. Might not feel too exciting, but will likely do the job.

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Reviewer 3:

My comments on this are similar to the rotational spring lever - this is a cool implementable element, but it doesn't seem exciting on its own. Requiring some dexterity to activate this, and also having to engage this mechanism first and in tandem with the lever, may make this more engaging. (It's not clear to me from the storyboard if this is required).

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Reviewer 4:

Somewhat similar comments to the spring lever above. I think you can integrate a lot more complexity than just a button on a wall, and it would be interesting to do some further brainstorming to see how this is achievable. Again, it might be interesting to put the shaft somewhere in the room for the users to find, and then they place it into the wall on their own.

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Reviewer 5:

This also seems really simple. Maybe there's a way to incorporate the museum theme further with this concept sketch. Maybe the wall column is incorporated into a sculpture that the players have to explore.

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Sketching technique, clarity of storyboard and concept sketches, and their web presentation

Client 1:

Your storyboard and sketches were clear, and I appreciate that in your concept sketches you explained how things were going to work. The one request I have is that you make your storyboards and concept sketches accessible from a single page, so I don't have to go back to the [url] page to switch between them.

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Client 2:

Nice sketches! Clear what you are trying to convey.

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Reviewer 3:

The sketches are overall very good; they look extremely realistic and they use the techniques we learned in class well. As mentioned above, adding another scene to the storyboard that shows the overall layout of the room as the players would see it would help to envision these concepts more clearly. Additionally, more detail on the actual concept sketches, providing brief explanations of specific elements in each of the sketches, would be clarifying. The website is easy to navigate, but would be easy to navigate if there were some identifying features included; for example title of the storyboard and team name, title on each of the concept sketches.

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Reviewer 4:

Your website overall is clean and well presented. Some of the captions were a little confusing, so maybe just read them over a few times before you put them on the website next time :). The storyboards were a little disjointed in the sense that you combined the concept sketches with other drawings into one frame, but it certainly didn't lose it's clarity in this regard either. Overall, I liked the room idea, and thought you did a good job thinking through a potential puzzle that would be of interest to the guests.

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Reviewer 5:

Beautiful perspective sketches! Really impressed given the complexity of the forms (angled screens, circular blocks). The storyboard is very clear and the web presentation well organized.

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