2.744
Concept Sketch Reviews
Home > Assignments > Concept sketch results > Reviews for Stephanie Diaz

Stephanie Diaz
team mango
[review]

StoryboardConcept Sketches
 Laser Maze Laser/Target Piece Immovable Double Mirror Piece Laser Door Presentation
Average Rating
 
Client 1:
Client 2:
Reviewer 3:
Reviewer 4:
Reviewer 5:
1-marginal     2-ok    3-good     4-very good    5-outstanding

Storyboard Laser Maze: innovativeness and potential

Client 1:

Thanks for providing the reference link - I was not familiar with this game.

I think what I understand from your storyboard is that teams have to light up all three stationary pieces, plus the target, to win the game.

I think this would be a lot of fun to play, but I have two concerns, one of which I think is solvable:

1) I'm not too fond of the idea of having large, heavy set pieces on wheels, especially ones that have electronics inside them. Could these be made to slide on rails instead of being completely free to move? This would also help address the problem of how you could get consistent power to them to power the IR sensors, as well as ensure that the lasers would always be at a consistent height (no tilting the box).

2) In a room with no roof, I'm not sure fog is feasible. This is the one that I'm not sure is solvable - you will have to do some testing here.

One piece I think you don't need to worry about is the camera. The show control system will know when all the correct sensors have been hit and end the game appropriately. That's good! I trust things that are physically wired together far more than I trust live image processing.

return to top of page


Client 2:

This is a pretty cool looking game. Lasers in dark, hazed rooms are really visually impressive.

return to top of page


Reviewer 3:

Laser maze sounds interesting but can be a little too complicated to be solved within 3 mins. There seems to be a lot of self-discovery elements from the team that we have to work with.

return to top of page


Reviewer 4:

The concept is interesting, and I think people would enjoy playing this game. What I don't like however is that it is possible to hit the target by moving only a single mirror and that you have to engage all the mirrors in the room even thought that is not necessary for hitting the target. The game should be designed in such a way that it is physically impossible to hit the target unless all the components are used. There are many ways of accomplishing this such as by using obstacles in the room. But a far more interesting approach to this game would be to have a single laser source which has to hit 3, 4, or 5 targets simultaneously. This can be achieved by using a beamsplitter. With this approach, you don't need any obstacles to make the challenge impossible to solve unless all optical elements are used. If you use multiple beam splitters you can add a layer of difficulty by having an odd number of targets tha need to be hit simultaneously. You can even make it extremely difficult if you have to make the players hit the targets at an orthogonal angle, of if they have to match the coherence length. There is no need for a camera. Just optical sensors is all that is necessary. No need to overcomplicate things. The code with the numbers seems to have been forcefully introduced into the storyboard, and it completely disconnected from the rest of it - where is the user getting the code from?

return to top of page


Reviewer 5:

This is a clever game and would be an enjoyable combination of physical and mental tasks, with the added bonus that lasers bring an extra pizzazz to the experience. The storyboard does a great job showing the room layout and the individual mirror elements. It may be worth considering scrapping the rule that all nonmovable mirrors must be used, or otherwise, making it more intuitively clear that these mirrors must be hit. Otherwise, the game could be frustrating if the lasers reach the target but the team doesn't understand why they haven't won.

return to top of page



Potential, feasibility, user experience and human factors shown in the concept sketch, Laser/Target Piece

Client 1:

I think your idea of making laser source and target live in the same piece has a lot of merit, and not just because it makes reset easier. Confining all of the electronics to one unit makes replacing it a lot easier too!

Maybe a bit overkill on the box-covered-in-LEDs. Can you get away with lighting up just a few on the interior and diffusing the light through cutouts along the length of the box?

When you playtest, pay attention to whether you need to adjust the box dimensions. I suspect that a box with a 2.5' square cross section will be too large for visitors to manipulate easily. Maybe the footprint can be 2.5' (I think you did this based on the calculations you did for the playing grid?) but the "body" of the box could be a bit thinner.

I don't think you need the LED screen here. Remember that Open World rooms are not escape rooms - the goal is not to get out of the room, it's to win the game or solve the puzzle. Your green/red LEDs will be enough feedback for the players.

return to top of page


Client 2:

This is a pretty good laser mount block. The A/B state switch is pretty clever.

return to top of page


Reviewer 3:

In terms of potential, I think its an interesting idea and would add fun to the room but feasibility seems unclear. It seems hard to implement.

return to top of page


Reviewer 4:

There is no need for the pice to be so huge relative to the sensors. I think a form-factor like a staff would be much more intriguing - similar to episode 1 of Indiana Jones. Also, making it transparent would be a better because it would look cool, and would also have an educational benefit.

return to top of page


Reviewer 5:

This sketch takes a very comprehensive view in thinking about all the elements of the part that need to work in concert with the room and with the human experience. Given all the grey space, there is probably room to add a bit more detail by showing the individual LEDs that cover the part or perhaps by showing an example of the LED screen would display (these details are currently captured by text rather than by the sketch).

return to top of page



Potential, feasibility, user experience and human factors shown in the concept sketch, Immovable Double Mirror Piece

Client 1:

I'm trying to think of a way that these can *just* be mirrors and not include any electronics, but I'm not sure it's possible. If the constraints of the game are that you must use all three mirror pieces, then you have to inform players when they're using them correctly...but it does increase the complexity of the project. There are already a lot of IO points in this game, and if you can figure out how to make these "analog", that would bring the number of ports down.

return to top of page


Client 2:

This piece presents challenges in detecting a beam without absorbing the beam. I don't think that a photosensor outside of the mirror will see much light if the beam is decently collimated. Maybe there is a mirror out there that will allow a small portion of light through without significantly disrupting the beam brightness, but this will need real investigation and testing.

return to top of page


Reviewer 3:

High potential to be engaging since its more a mental challenge than physical. Seems more feasible than the last one.

return to top of page


Reviewer 4:

The feasibility is sound, but again the 45 degree angle is seems uninteresting. Introduce some more interesting optical elements such as a beamsplitter or a pinhole and have not only more fun playing the game but also have an educational element too.

return to top of page


Reviewer 5:

The drawing is helpful to see the shape of the part, but it would be helpful to illustrate in more detail the key element (mirror), e.g., by shading what looks like a reflective surface or showing a laser beam bouncing off. As with the laser/target piece, some things that are described in text (like LEDs) could be drawn in to more clearly illustrate this element.

return to top of page



Potential, feasibility, user experience and human factors shown in the concept sketch, Laser Door

Client 1:

Going back to my earlier comment that Open World rooms are not escape rooms - we can't actually lock this door. It's part of the fire code that at least one door in the room has to be accessible and unlocked at all time, and since we have to lock the entry door to prevent multiple groups from entering at once...the exit door has to remain unlocked.

If you want to include a code in your game (I'm not suggesting this - I think it's fine without it), consider lighting up the numbers on the door to correspond to the number of mirror pieces you need to hit, or what order to hit them in.

return to top of page


Client 2:

This door seems like an elaborate build without much payoff. It would look cool, but in a room full of cool lasers, it may not be needed.

return to top of page


Reviewer 3:

The door in itself makes sense but adds another layer of complexity to what seems like an already complex room.

return to top of page


Reviewer 4:

Where/How is the user getting the code that they must enter? You can make this more interesting by having the user solve some challenge/puzzle that is part of the facade of the door.

return to top of page


Reviewer 5:

This is a very clear drawing that does a great job using a subtle ancillary feature (the hinges) to make clear that it is a door.

While it's clear how the red numbers help keep the laser theme of the room, perhaps it would be more appropriate (or at least thematically consistent) to show the number pads as dark grey/black to provide a stronger impression of laser light cutting through darkness. Additionally, if the numbers pads are LED screens, perhaps the numbers could appear to be projected from a point source behind the number pad, rather than shown as 2D. This could also help add to the laser mystique.

return to top of page



Sketching technique, clarity of storyboard and concept sketches, and their web presentation

Client 1:

Those images are pretty heavy! I'm not sure you need quite that high of a resolution to present content on the web.

It also might be nice to give each of your PNGs its own webpage, rather than just linking directly to the image. That lets the user navigate more easily back to your homepage.

Other than that, your sketches look very nice. I like the solid black outline that you gave to a lot of your solid objects, it makes them easy to "parse".

return to top of page


Client 2:

The concept for this game was well described, but the concepts were difficult to click through on the website.

return to top of page


Reviewer 3:

Good use of colors to depict the difference in the laser lightings and great use of markers for the shadows. Easy to navigate website and simple interface.

Suggestions - would have been easier to read the concept sketches had you typed those out instead of handwriting. Also, the concept sketches do not have a close or a back button. Viewers have to go back on the browser. Would be useful to add that.

The storyboard is also a little too detailed and descriptive.

return to top of page


Reviewer 4:

The sketches are made very well, but the handwritten text is sometimes too difficult to read. The text should have been separate from the images and typed to improve the clarity and comprehension of the presentation.

return to top of page


Reviewer 5:

The sketches use consistent and helpful shading. The one area for improvement with that regard is placement and shape of the shadows.

The storyboard is well laid out and it is particularly helpful that it shows a number of different perspectives (the view of the players, the view of the game components, and the layout of the game components and laser path). This all helps to imagine the experience holistically.

The website designs are simple but clean. The only particular area for improvement might be to allow easier navigation between concept sketches as the current approach requires use of the back button in the browser after clicking into each image.

return to top of page