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Concept Sketch Reviews
Home > Assignments > Concept sketch results > Reviews for Uvini Lokuge

Uvini Lokuge
tinkerdoodles
[review]

StoryboardConcept Sketches
 Underworld Labrynth Sphinx Vase Monkey Bars Tiles Presentation
Average Rating
 
Client 1:
Client 2:
Reviewer 3:
Reviewer 4:
Reviewer 5:
1-marginal     2-ok    3-good     4-very good    5-outstanding

Storyboard Underworld Labrynth: innovativeness and potential

Client 1:

I think these are 3 pretty good ideas, but I would pick one of them and develop it a bit and try to move forward with that.

I think I like the tile stepping one the most, but the challenge here would be how to send where people step (sensors in the floor can be very difficult)

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Client 2:

There's a lot going on here. Players have to figure out which tiles they can step on, and then they have to figure out that they can turn the Sphinx heads, and then they have to pull themselves over the monkey bars to get to the other side. Initially I wrote something here about that being too complicated, but I changed my mind. Just be careful not to make it MORE complicated.

Why is there a staircase at the end of the room? Every room has to be a single story high and stand on its own, without connecting to other rooms.

Also, you can't close the exit door if players mess up. The exit door has to be visible and unlocked at all times so people can get out in case of emergency. Is there another way you could make the path threatening?

And is there a reason for the entrance to the room being a small crawl space? People usually don't like crawling unless it's part of the challenge of the room (and here it's just a transition from outside to here).

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Reviewer 3:

I believe that this storyboard has high potential. I like the integration of physical and intellectual puzzles. Be careful with putting in hidden triggers for solving the puzzle, i.e. turning the Sphinx Vase. You want to make sure that the user has some way of figuring out that this might be a viable action within the establish rules of the room.

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Reviewer 4:

I like the idea of the experience a lot. I think this is a great twist on the "floor is lava" type game that adds additional challenges. Adding the additional sphinx-vase challenge is another nice extra challenge to make sure the challenge isn't only physical. I am a bit concerned bout the size of the room that you would need to execute on this idea well and you may want to think of alternatives to monkey bars that lower down from the ceiling simply because there is no ceiling! Overall this is a great idea.

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Reviewer 5:

This room fits the theme really well and seems like a fun game. It incorporates a lot of different elements without being overly complicated and everyone in the group would be involved in successfully completing the room. The monkey bars are the most exciting element. I like that the guests see the consequences of their errors by the door closing slightly every time they step on a wrong tile. Will there also be a time limit, so if the guests get to the last part and can't figure out how to turn the heads, they will eventually fail the room due to time being up?

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Potential, feasibility, user experience and human factors shown in the concept sketch, Sphinx Vase

Client 2:

This drawing is very clear, and I understand how you intend to sense whether the Sphinx heads are in the right place or not.

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Reviewer 3:

This sketch shows a good amount of the important details of the Vase. It might be helpful to include in the shaping of the sculpture details that inform the user that the head can be rotated. I think this sketch has a lot of potential, but the design must make relatively clear the object is meant to be interacted with.

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Reviewer 4:

The sphinx-head vases seem to provide a well-thought-out user experience. They have enough of shape to grip on to, and although they provide no concrete hints as to how to use them, they do seem partially intuitive. My only concerns are the height of the vases (are they too tall for a short person?) and the fact that there doesn't seem to be an indication you should turn their heads (can they turn both ways?).

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Reviewer 5:

This seems like a simple but elegant switch to have in the room. For the self resetting, how will you ensure that the button where the head starts won't accidentally be triggered again? It's really great that you wouldn't need to swivel the head to reset the vase, but it seems like the sensors may have to alternate between on and off as well. I don't quite understand the angled bar as it is drawn; seems like it may prevent the head from sitting flat in the base. I think you could get around having an angled bar completely if you were to use certain types of sensors.

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Potential, feasibility, user experience and human factors shown in the concept sketch, Monkey Bars

Client 1:

This seems hard to build. It seems like if people can see them, they are probably going to jump up or climb up to try to grab onto them. Could be a tricky one to build, but the user experience would be cool.

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Client 2:

The individual rooms in this venue won't have ceilings, so that the sprinklers from the overall venue can reach the inside of the rooms if there is a fire. You could mount a set of monkey bars from the tops of the walls, but it would be difficult to also have a motor that would lower them and raise them up... and you definitely couldn't put the motor on top of the ceiling, since there is no ceiling. There is some space to put things in the walls. Is there a simple way you could do this?

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Reviewer 3:

I'm a bit worried about feasibility in the implementation of the monkey bars, as the room will not have a ceiling to support it. I like the integration of the monkey bars into the room so as to add verticality and encourage creative problem solving but it may be difficult to have an actuated structure such as this, without a ceiling.

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Reviewer 4:

Monkey bars are a known jungle-gym toy, so I think your execution on the bars themselves should be pretty straightforward. Motor control of the up-ward downward motion might be a bit more difficult than a hydraulic linear actuator or something of the sort, but I think you have a bunch of options for their motion. My main concern with this gag is that there won't be any ceiling to hide the bars or mount them to-- all the rooms are open-topped. What are other ways that you can create a similar experience from wall- or floor- mounted pieces?

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Reviewer 5:

Monkey bars would be so much fun! It's clever to have them linked to the vases. I like that they appear and disappear. But I'm wondering how you might implement and support this element adequately within the modular rooms; without a ceiling and limited walls, it might be hard to provide enough structural support. If that is a concern, maybe instead of having the monkey bars come down from the ceiling, you could have the vases trigger some obstruction of the first or second monkey bar.

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Potential, feasibility, user experience and human factors shown in the concept sketch, Tiles

Client 1:

Load sensors would be good, but could be kind of tricky with the wires. But I like the concept.

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Client 2:

Like I said, you can't close the exit door. But this is a pretty good setup otherwise. Just make the tiles fairly big so there aren't a ton of them in the room - every tile needs a sensor, and the more sensors you have, the more likely something will break.

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Reviewer 3:

The sketch is simple, understandable and includes enough to communicate the idea.

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Reviewer 4:

I agree that these may be one of the simpler pieces of the room. Adding some sort of compression mechanism to the tiles (maybe just the evil ones?) may clue the users into the effects of their steps a bit more if you think that is necessary. I don't think that there are any unknown components of this gag, but it will be important to select durable load cells/ force pads and electronics for each of the tiles.

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Reviewer 5:

I like that the floor is very simple and doesn't require sensors on every tile, just the ones that would cause you to fail. This seems pretty straightforward to implement and could potentially be even more straightforward if it was more of a mat with load cells in certain areas. There would be a lot of potential to really make the artwork on the tiles stand out too.

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Sketching technique, clarity of storyboard and concept sketches, and their web presentation

Client 1:

Nice sketches! Very clear and looks I can understand what you're describing.

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Client 2:

I would've been thrilled if I could navigate to your concept sketches from your storyboard, and vice versa, instead of going back to [url] to switch between them. Otherwise, it was excellent! Very clear.

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Reviewer 3:

Your sketches were relatively clear to understand. I think some of the techniques for two point drawing could have helped to make them more 3D and provide a sense of scale for your room or concepts.

The storyboard, did well to show the user interaction with different parts of the room. I would have been nice to have a frame with a view of the full room to get an idea of scale.

Website provides the information clearly.

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Reviewer 4:

Your ideas, storyboard, and site are all clear and intuitive. One website tweak that might be nice is a link from the storyboard to the concept sketches (although it wasn't required). It also might be nice to make the sketches a bit larger on the site. For the storyboard, it might be nice to include some more detailed sketches (more perspective, details, etc.), but it is easy to follow along! The sketches themselves are great (the sphinx stands out just because it is the most complex)!

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Reviewer 5:

These sketches are really well done and clear. The storyboard conveys everything about the game understandably without being overly detailed. The extra details about how the room could be implemented and resetting mechanism show that the author put a lot of thought into the concepts. The concept sketches are also well done and use a lot of the techniques that we learned in class. One suggestion would be to make the handwritten explanations on the concept sketches both darker and larger; it is currently a little hard to read. It'd also be nice to have a link to the storyboard on the concept sketch page to make it easier to go between them and see what elements in the storyboard correspond to the concept sketches.

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