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User Experience Storyboard Reviews
Home > Assignments > User experience storyboard results > Reviews for Anika Yasmin

Anika Yasmin
team ark
[review]

 Enchanted Room Potion Brewing Dragon Duel storyboard design/website World of Magic
Average Rating
 
Client 1:
Client 2:
Reviewer 3:
Reviewer 4:
1-marginal     2-ok    3-good     4-very good    5-outstanding

Innovativeness and potential of Enchanted Room storyboard

Client 1:

I like the idea of "giving" a guest a power or ability that they don't have in real life, and don't necessarily know what it does or how powerful it is. It reminds me of the fun "try our my powers" in the beginning montage of a lot of superhero movies. It's a fun way to force the guest to change their mindset and fit their "new" situation.

I would love it if you could think more about what "enchant" means. Maybe it could be more specific then just "do a magic thing". I think that would be more fun, and also make it feel more logical for the guests to discover what the power really it.

I like the "feeling" of a cluttered living room, but also keep in mind that when people look around, they often make a mess! And the rooms needs to "self-reset" after they are done for the next group. For example, if they "pull" a book off the shelf, it's possible they won't put it back when they leave.

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Client 2:

You're assuming we're selling wands! That's a whole lot of organization, procurement, etc. on our part just for one set of rooms. It just isn't going to happen, so you shouldn't go forward with this mechanic when you do the next round with your team. (This puzzle doesn't even need people to have wands in order to solve the puzzle!) However, looking at the game without the wands:

Is there a cheap way to sense that the group is doing the right pose? How would you get the book back in the bookcase once the first group opens the door?

It is good that the script lights up when the players do the correct poses - that gives them feedback that they're going in the right direction. Question about the room theming - if you're going for a magical vibe, why are you going to make the room look like a normal, every-day room?

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Reviewer 3:

I really like how the magic wands and interactions the users take in this room really make it feel enchanted! I think there definitely is potential in this room in that there are many engaging multiplayer interactions. I am a little unclear as to what walking around and enchanting objects actually does in terms of progressing through the room? Also, I would think about how you can make this room self-resetting if you need to pull a book out of the shelf and things like that.

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Reviewer 4:

I like how the experience encourages exploration of the room and that the wands are a threshold goal in order to get to the room. I think many people want to have a working magic wand, which will make this particular experience super fun. I also think you paid good attention to the time constraint as this puzzle will probably take about 3 minutes or so to solve. I also think it's tricky enough that only some people will pass. How will you determine if they win or not? Is there a time limit to solve the code?

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Innovativeness and potential of Potion Brewing storyboard

Client 1:

I like the idea of mixing ingredients in a giant potion. It feels familiar but also exciting.

I would be a little bit concerned with how the materials are going to be able to reset when the group leaves as well here. If the group is confused, we don't want them to tear apart the room too much (when they get confused, they will likely be looking for clues!)

I like the timer mechanism. I think it makes sense, and the feedback of colors in the fog would be a very cool effect!

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Client 2:

Again: no wands. Is there a way to do the game without the wand? Would it be acceptable to just touch the right bottle to have an ingredient dispensed?

It doesn't make sense for the group to still be able to win if they put the ingredients in the wrong order the first time - the potion is already messed up! Might make more sense to have the group immediately lose if they put an ingredient in the wrong order. Then they can try again and do it in the right order. But once all the ingredients are in the potion, how are you going to get them back in the bottles for the next group? Even if you pre-load the bottles with a lot of ingredients, eventually you'll have to take everything that's been dropped in the cauldron and put them back in the bottles.

I like the timer surrounding the cauldron, and I think you've got the right difficulty level for your game. You just have to figure out how it could be done.

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Reviewer 3:

Again, I really enjoy how this puzzle really makes the users feel like wizards. I can really imagine the production opportunities in how things would look and feel! I would say to think about how this room would self-reset since you have so many moving parts. Also, I'm not really sure how they know what the correct order is? Do they find a clue to that somewhere?

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Reviewer 4:

I love how you combined several classic games/tasks into one unique game. I also love how the wands still play a part in solving the puzzle so the team gets to feel like they are really wizards. This puzzle seems trickier than the enchanted room, so teams might fail several more times before succeeding. The clear timer on the cauldron makes the time limit very clear. Your ideas of special effects are also wonderful, fog is always a fun touch. What other effects could you include? Maybe some specific sound effects when the wands are used or cubes are dropped into the cauldron. Also, how will the game be reset? how do the cubes dropped into the cauldron get back into the ingredient bottles?

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Innovativeness and potential of Dragon Duel storyboard

Client 1:

I really like the idea of dodging the red light. I think it's so fun! And very intuitive. It might be a good idea to try and give some feedback to the group when they "lose life points" Is there a way to make them invested? You want them to really worry about it!

"Attacking" the dragon when it lights up is a pretty good try to approximate a "battle" but it still kind of tricky to pull off I think. Think about how you could make it a little more "action-packed" and keep the energy up.

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Client 2:

Find a way to do it without wands! I like the idea of the players both having to both attach and defend, and I like the health bar which will let players know how much progress they've made. Here again, you should make it clear that staying in the red zone is a bad thing by making the players lose if any of them get stuck in it. You also would need to playtest to see if attacking a stationary object is fun (because it would be too expensive to make a dragon animatronic). Also, think about how the rest of the room (besides the dragon) would be themed.

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Reviewer 3:

I really love how Dragon Duel would involve physical activity and teamwork from everyone in the room. I believe it has a lot of potential in its interactivity, but I am a little concerned about how fun it would be due to the space constraints. I feel like to get the effect you are going for, you may need a much larger space than these worlds offer. In addition, I'm not quite sure how you would be displaying how much health the player has. I think it would be really cool to see how you can maybe adapt a similar puzzle concept to something that would still be fun without needing such a large space. For example, maybe changing the dragon to a different creature?

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Reviewer 4:

LOVE LOVE LOVE! Fighting off a dragon is a task that many movies, video games, and stories all incorporate, but I have never seen a physical experience where you get to actually battle a dragon. I really want this to exist so I can play. It's like a real-life video game. A few questions: How do the players keep track of their own health bars? What happens when one player loses all their health, but the other players still have some of theirs? Do they just have to watch their teammates play? Is there any way to regain health or score bonus health points before battling the dragon? Is there any way to avoid the health damaging light? Maybe the room also has bunkers or things to hide under/behind.

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Storyboard design and website presentation and execution

Client 1:

Nice job! The sketches themselves were clear and made sense. I like they you used color sparingly only where it really added to the idea.

The background was exciting, and has a lot of energy, but it's so colorful, it sort of takes away from the color that you sparingly used in your sketches. It's tough for colored pencil to compete with those bright colors!

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Client 2:

Love it, thank you so much for typing your explanations! Your pictures are clear and your site is easy to navigate, and the background fits the theme you've chosen. I also appreciate that you made it easy to see the titles of the storyboards.

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Reviewer 3:

I think your website is very intuitive and easy to navigate through. The storyboards are very easy to read and understand, and are also presented in a very clear way which I greatly appreciate! The drawings are very well done in conveying your ideas. It's also nice that the three icons at the top light up as you hover over them so the user knows to click on them. My only critique would be that I think the background looks a little off when you have an image tessellating like that and the colors may be a little too bright/take attention away from your storyboards which are the main important thing.

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Reviewer 4:

Very clean, simple, and clear designs. I completely understood your experience ideas and your illustrations. The markers were used effectively and with purpose, as was color. I really like how you emphasized the specific task in each frame with bolder markers, but didn't forget about other aspects going on in the room. The website is also simple, easy to navigate and goes with the theme. A slightly nit-picky detail: I do not think the thin white borders around each section are necessary; they're almost distracting. I do, however, like how you used the thick black border around the images and captions; it helps them stand out against the background.

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Room theme, World of Magic: engaging and interesting? identifiable with target users?

Client 1:

Yeah, I think this is great. Let's be honest: Harry Potter is a great fit for this age group, and most of what people are going in these rooms makes sense in that universe. I would flesh out a little bit the "who are we" question for the guest. It seems like we are wizards/magicians. Are we invading a dragon's castle. It the castle ours that is being defended? Plot isn't really important to me, but giving the guests an identity (example: defeat, explore, defend) helps the guest understand what their motives should be.

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Client 2:

Yes! Everyone loves magic! Harry Potter is a cultural touchstone.

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Reviewer 3:

I do think World of Magic seems engaging and affords interesting play experiences because the target users are probably people who grew up reading and watching Harry Potter and many other stories in the same genre. I think there's also a lot of opportunities in this theme for great production value and tricks and gags. It allows young adults to live their childhood dreams in a way that does not feel childish.

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Reviewer 4:

I think everyone has wanted to be a wizard or play with magic at some point in their lives; this theme lets their dreams become a reality. I love the idea of the wands and how the players have to use them intelligently to solve the puzzles. All of your experiences incorporate all members of the team as well and they have to work together to win. The logistics of letting people "buy" or "checkout" the wands might be a little difficult to figure out if the whole space being designed doesn't have much employee interaction, but I do think it is a necessary element to the experience. Maybe the players have to use their points to unlock a box in each room to get them and then have to return them to the same box before moving on.

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