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User Experience Storyboard Reviews
Home > Assignments > User experience storyboard results > Reviews for Erika Anderson

Erika Anderson
eager beavers
[review]

 Finding the Trail Superfood Fruit Jam Rope Bridge storyboard design/website Deserted Island Survival
Average Rating
 
Client 1:
Client 2:
Client 3:
Reviewer 4:
Reviewer 5:
1-marginal     2-ok    3-good     4-very good    5-outstanding

Innovativeness and potential of Finding the Trail storyboard

Client 1:

There are a few things going on here that I think might prove problematic:

1) Adding scent very rarely works out 'right.' Usually it just ends up either smelling awful, or not smelling like anything at all, and nowhere in between.

2) Adding heat to a light source will either be a fire hazard, or not noticeable by the guest, and nowhere in between. We would have to find another way to communicate to them that the light is 'bad.'

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Client 2:

Some of these elements are quite a challenge. Smells are challenging and even more so is heat. This game would take a lot of trial and error to create in a way that isn't too difficult or too easy.

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Client 3:

I think the obstacle course concept has potential. I wonder if it might be improved by adding more types of obstacles (climbing over/under stuff is great!) or by concealing some of the obstacles (sorry, that tile you just stepped on was actually quicksand) to increase the difficulty.

I love the idea of avoiding the sun, but I'm not sure how practical the gag is. I think that you have enough engaging content in the room to occupy visitors that you don't need the heat lamps to complete the concept.

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Reviewer 4:

I think this idea has a lot of potential. I can certainly see a room of obstacles that people need to avoid to get to the other side. You may even consider other obstacles that lie in the middle of the room, such as vines or hanging snakes etc, to make it more difficult to get across.

You could also potentially incorporate a reason to get to the other side to make it more immersive and goal oriented, such as getting to the other side to board a boat off the island, or escaping a dangerous predator...

A few questions I had though that you can think about:

What prevents people inside the room from just continuing on after they have stepped in the sunlight or on a branch etc? And how would they know if they stepped on something they weren't supposed to - will there be a noise, maybe something like an "life bar" on the other end (maybe it could be like fruits on a tree and every time they step on something a fruit falls)

I would also be concerned about shining a hot sun lamp that would be hot enough for people to recognize that they should avoid it. It might be that by the time you reach that point the lamp would be dangerously hot.

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Reviewer 5:

The tropical island theme is original and the opportunity to incorporate effects for numerous senses (sight, smell, sound, temperature, etc.) is very compelling. The idea to use real heat, and not just light, to mimic the sun is particularly interesting, if it can be executed safely.

While the combination of obstacles on the ground and from the "sky" is a compelling physical challenge, the experience could use a bit more detailed thinking as to sequencing and team dynamics. How can the room be best experienced by several teammates rather than one individual making his/her way around the obstacles?

The room appears to be largely static, which would enable self-resetting, but is there any opportunity to incorporate movement of the set components (e.g., the branches and other obstacles near the ground)?

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Innovativeness and potential of Superfood Fruit Jam storyboard

Client 1:

How does this reset?

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Client 2:

This looks like it could be a neat version of a logic puzzle. I would try to create this game with less moving parts. Is there a way to integrate the book or the "rules to the game" in a more visible way? A book will get very worn quickly and not everyone can see what is written.

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Client 3:

This is definitely different than any concept I've seen before. My questions are mostly around how this relates to the overall Island Survival theme. There are a a few elements here that seem surprising to find on a tropical island - namely the binder and the jam making machine! Maybe the survival guide information could be communicated in the environment by showing animals holding only the good combinations, but never the poisonous ones. That has the benefit of involving the whole group in the search for information.

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Reviewer 4:

I think this idea is good since it has multiple tasks that teams can split up in order to achieve, so it would engage all team members.

How do you determine color matching? Is it by color of the fruit or is it some random order?

Also how easy is it to find the fruit? Are they lying around in plain sight or are they hidden around the room? Hiding them would make the room more challenging and engage more people.

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Reviewer 5:

This is a clever approach to incorporating mental puzzles to the deserted island theme. In terms of team dynamics, perhaps there could be a sequence of 3 fruit smoothies that must be made, each with an increasingly challenging formula. This would increase reliance on team memory and analysis, and would create opportunity to fail, learn from experience, and re-try.

The ability to physically engage with the fruit adds a compelling dynamism to the room. However, the sketch of the juicer makes it appear relatively small. Perhaps there is more opportunity to make the entire room engaging - for example, after being inserted into the juicer, could the fruit return to the room by seemingly dropping from trees around the room? This might be challenging to implement, but could provide a more immersive room experience.

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Innovativeness and potential of Rope Bridge storyboard

Client 1:

This looks interesting! How does it reset between groups? If it's actuated and not digital (like a projection,) how is it done robustly? Guests abuse things like you wouldn't believe.

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Client 2:

An important factor to keep in mind, all Open World experiences must be self-resetting. At no time will a staff member enter the room to "undo" what the last group did and put the game back into the original starting state. Can this idea be designed in a way that makes it self-resetting?

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Client 3:

I love it! I especially like the idea of mistakes breaking the bridge further, so the more mistakes you make, the more difficult the challenge is. I think this could be a great combination of a physical and mental challenge, and it is immediately obvious what the goal is, but not how to accomplish the goal.

The breaking handrail is the most show-control-intensive piece of this. I think the gag is worth pursuing, but I wonder if the effect could be achieved by visually eliminating tiles instead, rather than having the handrail physically topple over. I'm picturing some kind of video representing each board/tile, so that the bridge is really projected onto the underside of the pressure-sensitive tiles. That way you can change the state of the tiles in video, which makes fabrication a lot easier!

I like this concept a lot, and I want to play it!

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Reviewer 4:

I like how this room has a clear indication of each failure, the number of failures the team has made, and how many attempts they have left all within one simple system.

However, it may be that this will not be as engaging for all the team members since it is mainly one person in the front trying each tile and everyone else just following.

Also is only one person allowed on the bridge at a time? If not then all the members can very easily follow the exact steps of the first person as they make them, so there will be no need to remember the pattern. On the other hand, if only one person is one the bridge at a time then the other team members are just watching and are not really engaged.

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Reviewer 5:

The rope bridge is a great thematic fit and lends itself well to an interesting visual experience within the room (e.g., underfoot tiles that register steps and can also light up to appear cracked or missing).

The experience could use some further thinking as to how the user learns about the safe path. If it is purely arbitrary and determined by guess and check, it may not be as engaging as if there are subtle clues about the right path. Additionally, further building in a teamwork element would help improve the experience. Perhaps pressure sensors in the floor could help identify when people are standing too close on the bridge, and provide a further challenge (have to find the right path AND make sure to cross as a team fast enough to beat the timer but not so fast that the team is too heavy on the bridge.)

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Storyboard design and website presentation and execution

Client 1:

Legible and simple to understand.

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Client 2:

Small note, there was no way to go from storyboard to storyboard without hitting the back button on my browser.

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Client 3:

Well presented and organized. No complaints!

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Reviewer 4:

The images of the storyboard were clear and highlighted the important points that were made in order to complete the story.

The homepage was intuitive and easy to use. The different color used for the titles helped them stand out. However, it seemed repetitive to have the title written above and below the image

The images on the site varied depending on the window size, so when I had the website on full screen the images were wide and distorted, and as I made the screen smaller the images became narrower. I think it would have been better to define a specific size for the images so they remain without distortion.

I would have also liked a way to return to the homepage after clicking on an image, or to be able to switch between pages without having to return to the homepage every time.

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Reviewer 5:

The storyboards are well drawn and the combination of sketches and commentary provide a sufficient level of detail to understand the premise of the activities.

The homepage is simple and intuitive. However, clicking into each storyboard takes the viewer straight to an image that is just a bit too small (zoomed out) to read easily, but too big (zoomed in) when clicked. A better approach may be to fix the image size at a readable level, or to offer a more dynamic zooming experience (may depend on browser). Additionally, once clicked into an image, there is no ability to click back to home or to another storyboard without using the browser's back button. Navigation between storyboards could thus be made a bit more streamlined.

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Room theme, Deserted Island Survival: engaging and interesting? identifiable with target users?

Client 1:

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Client 2:

Interesting theme. Sometime it may be difficult to integrate technology into an environment where technology is forbidden.

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Client 3:

Yes, I think the concept is easily accessible. As mentioned above, I think there needs to be some attention paid to what fits inside the theme and what doesn't. The jam machine I think requires some suspension of disbelief, whereas the rope bridge is is a great example of something that is culturally indicated and easy to relate to.

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Reviewer 4:

Overall a room can certainly take on this theme such that people have an immersive experience, through sounds, smells (might be more difficult to achieve in an open ceiling room though) and props.

I think including goals or a background to each room could also be beneficial, so making a reason why they have to get to the other side of the room.

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Reviewer 5:

Yes, the theme is engaging and provides for numerous dynamic activities, with the potentially to engage numerous senses and physical and mental capabilities. Any user would likely have some direct or cultural affiliation with a tropical island vibe and it would certainly elicit a sense of adventure.

The first storyboard makes use of heat lamps and it would be very interesting to explore the limits of modulating the environment within a 5wits room, whether temperature, humidity, air flow, etc.

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