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User Experience Storyboard Reviews
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Florence Yip
team puzzled
[review]

 Unlock the Door Details Matter Too Many Keys storyboard design/website Wild West Ghost Town
Average Rating
 
Client 1:
Client 2:
Reviewer 3:
Reviewer 4:
1-marginal     2-ok    3-good     4-very good    5-outstanding

Innovativeness and potential of Unlock the Door storyboard

Client 1:

This sounds like it could be a lot of fun. I like the use of wooden planks as part of a western theme! A few things you may want to consider that would effect gameplay is whether the planks move and stay in place or whether part of the puzzle is fighting gravity (maybe you need to hold a plank up while another player slides one beneath it). Is the goal to find the door handles or do all of the planks need to be in a specific location before the door can be opened?

I do think that there are several potentially large technical challenges regarding this design. The biggest one seems to be resetting. After the room is beat, how does it automatically reset for the next group? This could prove very challenging without introducing a lot of complex mechanics (I think it is absolutely possible with a little creative design though). I have a feeling that in further developing your design you are going to find that having the block puzzle built into a door is going to add a lot of unnecessary complexity. Having to add pneumatics or motors and a bunch of sensors (like mag switches) is one thing (and will certainly be necessary), but getting them to all live in something designed to open is another entirely, and I personally don't think it will add a lot overall.

My advice is to continue with the design, I like it. I think you should have the puzzle live separately from the door though. Have the blocks solve in a specific position, a single block need to be moved to a single position (like rush hour) or have a hidden button behind one of the blocks, then have this open the door next to it. As far as resetting I think there is a lot of design work needing to be done, but I'd look at simple pneumatics and attempting to use gravity as much as possible for the reset. There is certainly great design potential here. Nice work!

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Client 2:

This is cool! I like the idea of a "rush hour" puzzle that unlocks the door. It's a bit of a tricky mechanical design challenge, but not one thats too much to overcome.

One thing to think about is the rest of the room: right now, the only element that really work with is the door. Is there a way to incorperate more to the solution? Maybe there are things on the walls that move? Keys on chains, or something else. Just thinking about trying to engage more of the physical space.

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Reviewer 3:

This is a really cool room! To shift around the blocks on the door in the right sequence / position would be really frustrating and I could see the failure rate being high when there is not a lot of time to figure it out. The "reset" option of the puzzle could just be two options that win - one that is very unlike the other.

I can imagine some "old-timey" saloon music playing in the background of all of these puzzles, maybe having the music speed up as the time runs shorter.

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Reviewer 4:

I really like how the door in itself is a puzzle. This seems really fun and surprising. In consideration of people flow and location, I would put the door deep enough into the space such that up to 5 people can comfortably move around and be out of the hallway.

Other than the spacing, I think this is the perfect room that can be solved in less than 5 minutes. In order to keep it fresh and interesting for players returning, you can consider programming the door to exist in multiple states with varying levels of difficulty.

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Innovativeness and potential of Details Matter storyboard

Client 1:

This sounds like a fun challenge! I can easily see how this could work into the Western theme through a general store or saloon bar. Overall I think this sounds like a fun game.

I have some concerns about the technical feasibility of the design, but these might be able to be worked out with some creative technical design work.

My first and biggest concern is in resetting the room for the next group. After the room is solved, how does it get back into the 'unsolved' state? Are there two separate states the room can be solved in and groups are essentially just moving things back and forth? Maybe pneumatics make the shelves 'crash down' and the items spill all over the floor and need to be put back? This is the first big technical hurdle that will need to be figured out with the design.

The second technical challenge is going to be in how precisely the room needs to be set back up. Using magnets and magnet switches in the shelves and bases will require VERY precise placement. Machine vision cameras will require similar unless a lot of programming work is done. I think that creating pocket cutouts in the shelves that the bases of the objects fit into will help a lot with getting the sensors to work properly.

My advice is that while moving things around the room and having a hidden key on the wall is a great design concept, be prepared for your gameplay to change a little bit as you start solving some of the technical details. I think that doing this and letting your design evolve naturally will result in a really great room! I think there is a lot of potential here!

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Client 2:

I like this. I like the "make this look like that" kind of activity. I also like the bookshelf reveal. That's fun.

The trickiest part about this idea is how the room would reset. I could imagine a confused group really tearing this room apart! There could be books and barrels all over the floor etc. They might make a mess! There would have to be some way to make any possible room state a potential starting place for the next group. Maybe there is a way to "constrain" some or most of the items.

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Reviewer 3:

The attention to detail matters on this room for sure. Not sure how the exact positions of the items in the room would be confirmed, but the idea is a good one.

The reset function could be the opposite photo of how the room was previously set up for the next customers. It's a self reset option that makes it a reasonably easy "hands-off" process for reset.

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Reviewer 4:

I really like how you placed the hint behind the door that people entered from. I think the better you camouflage this detail, the more fun the discovery would be. Maybe add a few coats behind the doors just to cover it some more and make the color of the photo frame blend in with the colors of the door.

Details do matter! Great shading by the way!

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Innovativeness and potential of Too Many Keys storyboard

Client 1:

This seems like a great start to a really unique Open World game! I think it still needs quite a bit of development work though.

My immediate question is what information is shown on the posters on the walls and how do they correspond to the engravings on the keys? How do we keep from giving too much information to sift through while still providing enough that the solution isn't immediately obvious?

Technically, I think you might want to explore momentary keyed switch locks instead of physical locks and keys. The room will need to be reset between groups automatically which is going to be really difficult to do with physical locks. It is also best not to give guests small objects like keys that they could easily walk away with and leave a room unsolvable. I think a great way around this would be to use momentary keyed switch locks and design a way to secure the keys permanently to the walls. The door could then unlock via software and would leave the room fairly easy to reset.

I think that with some further design work, and a rock solid plan on how the 'clues and engravings' game mechanic will work, you could have yourself a great Open World room!

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Client 2:

This looks like fun! I think it's interesting that you COULD potentially brute-force the game, but maybe it's basically impossible to do it, which forces people to looks for actual keys.

Regular padlocks and house keys can be a little tricky for maintenance. They can break off pretty easily, and potentially would need replacement. IS there a way to get around that? Maybe it's an industrial key that's extra strong? Maybe a different input device?

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Reviewer 3:

Getting something that works, but isn't the best method to success, is going to be super frustrating for the clients (which can be a good thing). They would never be able to try all the keys before the time runs out, but the other method of matching the engravings is the only way.

I like this room and it has a good feel of the "old-western-jail" that we have seen in every western movie we've ever seen. Playing up the prisoner role could be really fun. The posters could change to show the people's name that enter into the room - and they are now locked up in jail.

I like this room a lot.

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Reviewer 4:

I like how there are multiple ways to solve your room puzzle. It is good for keeping a large group motivated.

You may consider making these locks electromagnetic so that you can control them with electricity when you want to reset them.

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Storyboard design and website presentation and execution

Client 1:

Everything was well laid out and concise. It looks great.

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Client 2:

Awesome job. Great sketches and good use of text without being too wordy.

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Reviewer 3:

Your wild west ghost town theme was really felt in your design. I like the old piano and the "wanted" posters that were part of the puzzles. I appreciated your intro page that has a brief explanation about what to expect and how you visited a town that inspired you! Really cool.

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Reviewer 4:

I like how you had a home page to explain the overall theme. This little detail goes a long way in explaining your theme to someone remotely. The background color theme also arouse the ghost town feels.

I love your individual presentation of each storyboards. Putting each boards individually really helps emphasize the details. Also great use of shading and colors. Your pictures are also very clear. I was able to understand your message easily.

In terms of flow, it would have been nice if I can move to the next board when I got to the bottom of the page without having to scroll all the way back up. It's an extra action that doesn't add any value to your website experience.

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Room theme, Wild West Ghost Town: engaging and interesting? identifiable with target users?

Client 1:

Definitely! Who doesn't want to play around in the Old West? I think there is lots of potential here.

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Client 2:

I think this is a very cool theme. Kind of a tiny bit spooky, but mostly just rugged and dusty and in a fun way.

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Reviewer 3:

The wild west theme is a really strong option - and I think people would want to go back into an old abandoned saloon to solve puzzles multiple times.

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Reviewer 4:

I really enjoyed each of your storyboards, but I don't clearly understand their connection to your theme. When I think of ghost towns, I think of scary ghosts, and old dilapidated creepy architecture. While your room has really awesome activities, they don't really connect to the theme.

I think your storyboard is fitting for the age range of the target users. I think they would be appealed by the spookiness of your theme.

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