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User Experience Storyboard Reviews
Home > Assignments > User experience storyboard results > Reviews for Ben Gray

Ben Gray
6dimwits
[review]

 HIDE! Jewels Fenced storyboard design/website A Life of Crime
Average Rating
 
Client 1:
Client 2:
Client 3:
Reviewer 4:
Reviewer 5:
1-marginal     2-ok    3-good     4-very good    5-outstanding

Innovativeness and potential of HIDE! storyboard

Client 1:

How does the adventurer know if they are "too loud"? Are you using localized speakers? What feedback does the user have to know if they are doing well or failing?

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Client 2:

Great ideas here! I think you could have them hide inside objects or behind things, instead of in tiny rooms. Those rooms will probably not meet code by the time you cram 3 to 5 of them in a space.

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Client 3:

I like the simplicity... sensing motion is the Hallway is great. Are you thinking to also sense noise? Is it possible too ignore ambient noise and other guests in adjacent rooms? Has a similar feeling to the second room of platoon. Figuring the wait time between hiding will be key...

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Reviewer 4:

I think that HIDE! has very good experience potential. There is something really fun about hiding in a hallway, and the idea of using sounds to explain when it is safe and when it is not is very intriguing. One thing to consider is what are the guests hiding from? As in from what direction would someone 'find' them. This needs to be clear so that the guests know what they have to be out of view of.

Hiding in a hallway is not that original of an idea, it is a trope used in many crime and other types of movies. However, this is perhaps what makes it so much fun to do. To add some originality you could have there be activities in the rooms, or maybe information that the guests need to gather and use when they get to the end of the hallway in order to escape.

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Reviewer 5:

The HIDE! storyboard has a high potential because its primary mechanisms include sensors and sound, which can be made to self-reset. It is quite easy to understand and introduces some cardio by having the players dash across the hallway and dart into rooms. To make it a little more "hands-on", relatable, and challenging for the players, it may be helpful to incorporate the theme "a life of crime" more directly. What could the players be hiding from--the CIA, police dogs, etc.? Perhaps it could be a game of hide and seek where you hear police dogs barking and sirens and see flashing lights, and you need to rearrange 2-3 items in the rooms to get them off your tail? Overall, this storyboard can easily be implemented, and there is opportunity to incorporate a greater degree of challenge.

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Innovativeness and potential of Jewels storyboard

Client 1:

An important factor to keep in mind, all Open World experiences must be self-resetting. At no time will a staff member enter the room to "undo" what the last group did and put the game back into the original starting state. Can this idea be designed in a way that makes it self-resetting?

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Client 2:

This one's fun! I could really see this working as a game. I think actually moving the gem and putting it in a briefcase might be an unnecessary step.

Unlike typical escape rooms, there is no staff interaction with the room in between groups. So there would be no way for that to reset automatically.

I think simply touching it would be enough for guests to feel successful.

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Client 3:

I like the idea... What is the physical reset for the gem? How do you get it back to the stand? Is there something more fun than holding the two "off buttons? Is it possible to do the jewels with a hologram so that it can go from one to the other in a digital way that looks real?

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Reviewer 4:

I think this is an innovative take on the classic jewel stealing theme. Whereas it is often done with a web of lasers, you use cameras to give a similar affect. However, using cameras makes it more interesting because they can rotate and move to make the room more challenging.

I think this room has potential because avoiding the cameras will be difficult, but it is something that guests can improve at as they attempt the room multiple times. I like that there is a second step of realizing that the Jewel needs to be replaced, you can't just steal the Jewel and win. I can see teams thinking that they are done but then just taking the Jewel and failing. However, in this case the room would not be self resetting because the team just took one of the jewels out and didn't put one in, so that is something to consider when designing the room.

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Reviewer 5:

The Jewels storyboard is an exciting enactment of a jewelry heist! It has multiple points of interaction--the 2 buttons to disable the camera, the button to disable the alarm, and the real vs. fake jewel. This makes it an engaging challenge where 3-5 people can explore the room, communicate their discoveries, and hatch a plan. To better transport the players into this open world, it would be helpful to define the context. Does the heist take place in a jewelry store, museum, auction house, bank, or other place? Also since there are multiple parts to the challenge, incorporating clear points of completion will help the players understand if they have successfully completed a part. For example, the cameras can glow red when activated and shut off when they are disabled. As another example, the briefcase can be stuck in an open position at the beginning and then be able to be closed when the jewel has been swapped. Does disabling the cameras automatically trigger the alarms? From the storyboard, it is not explicitly stated. Overall, this is a good story with creative, collaborative elements, and the design is implementable and auto-resettable!

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Innovativeness and potential of Fenced storyboard

Client 1:

This concepts seems rather one player. Is there any way to make this more of a group activity?

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Client 2:

Love it! Think about how the picks and the cards might reset in between groups. Otherwise, the 'escape from the sirens' is a fun idea. We'd need a more quantifiable way to display time, though - as simply using the volume of a sound might be hard for a guest to understand.

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Client 3:

How can this be made a 4 player game? Seems like it is largely one person? Can the lock require more group interaction? can it be a push button lock on the inside that has the numbers out of order and you have to see it in a mirror to realize it?

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Reviewer 4:

There isn't a lot of innovativeness in this idea, guests find a locked door and force their way through it. However, I do like that it is a fence, this makes it really fit with the theme and gives the feeling of more urgency when trying to escape.

One concern with this room is that some guests may accidentally take the lock picks or card with them when they leave, since they are small items. So it will be important to think about how to ensure that they remain in the room.

I'm also not sure if this will fully engage a team of 3-5 guests, as there seems to only be something for one person to do at a time. Because of this issue I'm not sure that there is a lot of potential in this storyboard, as engaging all team members is an important part of having an enjoyable experience for all of the guests.

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Reviewer 5:

"On the Fence" does a good job of instantly communicating the theme and objective of the game to the players with the fence and the police sirens. It becomes clear early on that one is trying to escape from the police by climbing the fence. Since the placement and level of disguise of the key card and lock picks impacts how quickly the puzzle can be solved, it would be good to make it easier to find the lock picks and harder to find the real solution--the key card. Perhaps it can be positioned high up on the fence and require a team member to hop onto another team member's back to reach it? Or the key card could be buried in the trash depicted on in the first scene? Since the game needs to automatically reset, it would be helpful for the storyboard to depict how the players interact with the key card and lock picks to understand how these elements are reset. For example, they may simply have to touch the items. If they have to physically swipe the key card, will the players also have to place the key card back in its original position? The audio feedback of the lock clicking open is a good way of communicating to the players. Overall, this storyboard conveys a clear, vivid scene. It can be an exhilarating experience when it is designed with the appropriate level of difficulty.

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Storyboard design and website presentation and execution

Client 1:

Hide was a challenge to understand, but the others were relatively clear.

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Client 2:

Great! Simple, legible, easy to understand. Very good job explaining your ideas.

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Client 3:

Drawings had just enough clarity to tell the story and not look sloppy...

The website was very simple I like the clicking at the top though rather than all on one page...

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Reviewer 4:

The drawings overall conveyed what was happening at that point in the storyboard. However, there were times that the scan made them a bit too light which made it less clear. Also, there were times when your handwriting was a little hard to read, although never impossible to discern.

Your website was very clear and easy to use.

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Reviewer 5:

The website is laid out simply and clearly with the bold title "A Life of Crime" at the very top. When the computer screen is set at 100%, all three columns show up on the page, which is helpful to the viewer. The panels also open nicely on a mobile device. I like how you incorporated the players' thought process to tell the story of the user's experience in the rooms. I also liked how you added an element of color in "On the Fence." To be consistent, it would be nice to see a description for all panels (i.e., "Hide" and "Bejeweled" do not have descriptions in the last row of panels). Although some of the handwritten descriptions are a little difficult to read, they complement the visuals and help the viewer understand what is going on. With a bit more detail in the visuals, it may help the viewer better understand the experience. For example in "On the Fence," the second panel depicts a cop car. Since there is no car in the room, but just the sound of sirens, it would be more intuitive for the viewer to see a criminal worried about the police (e.g., thought bubble with a police car). Overall, the visuals and descriptions communicate the stories, and there is potential for greater clarity with a bit of refinement.

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Room theme, A Life of Crime: engaging and interesting? identifiable with target users?

Client 1:

Everyone wants to be a gangster!

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Client 2:

People love the heist theme.

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Client 3:

I think that the theme was good and the content was there... A little more development and this could be a great set of rooms...

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Reviewer 4:

I think that A Life of Crime will definitely be an engaging room theme because it is fun to get the opportunity to try to do things that are often done in movies. These movies also provide guests with enough experience to solve the rooms and enjoy them fully.

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Reviewer 5:

The overall room theme of "A Life of Crime" is very engaging and fun for users across ages 15 through 35. The users can relate to this theme because it is often used in movies (e.g., The Great Heist, Ocean's 11-13, The Godfather, The Usual Suspects, etc.), books (e.g., In Cold Blood, Murder on the Orient Express, etc.), and video games. Being able to play the "bad guys" makes the experience particularly stimulating. The physical and aesthetic design of the room will be important to conveying the grunginess of a life of crime. The mood can further be set with the appropriate music to induce a heart-racing feeling. Because a life of crime involves a lot of hiding, running, and disguising, incorporating game elements where the players have to move like a criminal by crouching, crawling, or staying quiet could be a fun physical element.

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