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User Experience Storyboard Reviews
Home > Assignments > User experience storyboard results > Reviews for Hans Kobor

Hans Kobor
scribbles n bits
[review]

 Through the Escape Hatch High Stakes Maintenance The Asteroid Belt storyboard design/website Perilous Space Adventures
Average Rating
 
Client 1:
Client 2:
Reviewer 3:
Reviewer 4:
1-marginal     2-ok    3-good     4-very good    5-outstanding

Innovativeness and potential of Through the Escape Hatch storyboard

Client 1:

This storyboard is a very high-level, conceptual introduction to the theme. There is not much here that I can really critique. I gather that the main game in this room is some sort of obstacle course made up of spaceship debris, which is a workable concept for a space-themed room, but to answer questions about innovativeness and potential, I'd like to see more detail about what the obstacles are, how users might receive feedback, what the success/failure conditions are, etc.

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Client 2:

Obstacle courses with a time limit sound fun!

Getting the difficulty of the obstacles right may be hard. Perhaps the elements could be designed to require cooperation to get through, like walls that require a boost from someone else to climb.

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Reviewer 3:

The design is neat and easy to follow. I like how the the laser gag in the spy theme is changed to fit this theme. More focus can be given on how the obstacles could look like.

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Reviewer 4:

I like the dedication to theme - how the first room introduces where they are (in a space ship above earth), and then all of the obstacles and goals (traveling through wreckage to escape hatch) fit very well into the theme.

One thing to think about is how you will make it clear that they are trying to make their way to the escape pod, and they're not just traveling down a hallway for no good reason. Maybe the evacuation announcement could also tell them to find the escape pod.

Some more detail as to what types of obstacles they'll have to traverse would be good, but overall I'd say this idea has great potential - clear theming, a cohesive story, and a great mission (everyone loves obstacle courses) Make sure that obstacles in the hallway are innovative and fit in the theme.

I really think that the atmosphere that you create with the lights and sirens and maybe other things (smoke, shaking, etc..) can make or break this experience, but that done well it could be really cool.

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Innovativeness and potential of High Stakes Maintenance storyboard

Client 1:

The damaged spaceship premise is a classic, and is a good starting point for this room. Players will immediately have a sense of urgency when solving this puzzle, and that's good!

My concern about this concept is about how to reset the puzzle. If the parts start out on the floor, but are placed in the oxygen generator as part of the solution, how do they get back on the floor for the next group? Consider how you might mount broken pieces in a wall panel, or use multiple solution states to avoid the need to reset.

I think the broken screen gag is a good one. I would not have it shut off completely, because then teams could miss the crucial information entirely. Instead, maybe it could flicker and go out at random intervals, and restore itself a few seconds later (or after a little percussive maintenance?).

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Client 2:

Having to remember a simple layout before it disappears is a unique kind of mental challenge. Groups will probably not see the need to memorize the first time, and will probably help force replay.

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Reviewer 3:

The gag idea is very unique and helps to foster collaboration. However, remembering the schematic might be too difficult for the general public and it could be made easier for them.

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Reviewer 4:

Theming is a little less strong here than in the other two, since there aren't screens that are explicitly showing you being in space, but I think it has potential to still feel like a space-ship, especially if you put a lot of thought into decorations. Make sure that it doesn't just seem like you're in a random place fixing random things.

Love the idea of smoke coming out of the O2 machine after you fix it - a visible sign of their success is important.

I'd say this one is a little more innovative than your first idea, and one way you could continue that is by putting a lot of thought into what the assembly of the thing they're fixing looks like. How do the parts go together, and are there many different types of fastening/assembly that they have to figure out, or is there a consistency in the way things go together? Will the parts be labeled or be modeled on actual compressor parts, or will they be fabricated so that you can control the geometry more?

Is there a way to ensure that they need to find the blueprint before trying to put it together, or is that important to you? In other words, do you want the blueprint to function as a hint or as an integral clue? I know my first reaction upon seeing a pile of parts would just be to try to put them together, and it might require some thought to discourage that and force them to search for the schematic.

Overall, a super cool idea (especially to us engineers of course)!

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Innovativeness and potential of The Asteroid Belt storyboard

Client 1:

I'm not entirely sure what the gameplay is supposed to be here. The whole team needs to work together to maneuver the ship, I understand that. But what is the mechanic? Does each person monitor one of the ship's control surfaces? Needs more detail before I can give feedback.

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Client 2:

Remapping previously understood controls is a good way to make a simple-seeming task difficult. Hitting the asteroid to cause the reconfiguration seems like you've already lost though. Perhaps the reconfiguration can occur due to some internal reason? A power surge, computer virus, etc?

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Reviewer 3:

The use of space shuttle controls to control the space shuttle, though has alot of potential is as innovative as it is pretty much used in most of the space related gags.

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Reviewer 4:

My first thought is that it'll require thought to make this collaborative. How do the controls work? Is each person controlling a certain direction, or certain function of the ship? Otherwise, the story that they're all controlling the same ship won't fly (no pun intended), if they each have their own screen.

I'd say this has potential but feels a lot more video-gamey than the other two. If you can include real-world feedback when they hit an asteroid, that might help make it more immersive. Sounds, sparks, maybe shaking the floor somehow?

Another question I have is how will it work when there are more than three people? Is there space at each board for more than one person, or can they help in other ways?

Overall, less innovative than the other two (in my opinion), but navigating an asteroid belt is a classic space-ship adventure, and this could be super cool if it's immersive and challenging enough.

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Storyboard design and website presentation and execution

Client 1:

Your drawings are very small! Don't be afraid to show close-ups of important components.

I wish some of your ideas had been fleshed out a little more. You have a lot of information about the overarching plot but not a lot about what a user will actually experience, which is something that I'm looking for in these storyboards.

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Client 2:

The ideas in the storyboard are clearly expressed and easily understandable

Some small details don't seem completely fleshed out. Perhaps a little more visual detail on what sort of obstacles, schematics, or controls would be used.

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Reviewer 3:

The use of color helps the enhance the clarity of the design. Is there a reason why orange was used for the asteroids?

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Reviewer 4:

Clarity of the stories was overall pretty good. Your captions were succinct and clear, and the stories itself were well told and engaging. The last one was maybe a bit less developed than the other two as far as the story goes (transition from penultimate to final slide was unclear).

Design of the storyboards was pretty good. The pictures were somewhat minimalistic, but it made it easy to see what was happening and focus on the important bits.I liked the black outlines and the use of color. There could have been more use of the perspective rules we've learned (the slide with a room in the second storyboard didn't use perspective).

As for the website, it did the job. Aesthetically, I liked the color scheme and the starry background. It didn't manage well when I resized the screen (captions went off the background and were hard to read), but that's a small issue that we weren't necessarily supposed to address? Nice convenient linking to the individual pages using the thumbnails at the top.

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Room theme, Perilous Space Adventures: engaging and interesting? identifiable with target users?

Client 1:

This could definitely be an engaging theme. Put some time into developing your gameplay ideas, and I think that many people will relate to it.

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Client 2:

There are plenty of movies and games that have used this sort of theme to great effect, and it has many opportunities for games and challenges. Good theme choice.

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Reviewer 3:

Yes, the overall theme seems engaging for users, especially since space travel is a hot topic now. The gags would excite target users, especially since there are alot of interesting problem solving involved.

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Reviewer 4:

I think the theme is very relevant to the target audience. Whether in movies, video games, or books, most people have been exposed to space adventure stories, and it's always fun to imagine yourself as a character in Star Wars or Star Trek or Ender's world. The play experience ideas Hans came up with are fun and have lots of potential. There is maybe more danger of the physical look of the rooms seeming hokey just because it's easier to make something look like a rock than to make it look like a convincing space ship control panel, but with thought it could be awesome if it's pulled off well.

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