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User Experience Storyboard Reviews
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Justin Chiu
eager beavers
[review]

 Hole in Space Asteroid Aversion Space Walk storyboard design/website Space Adventures
Average Rating
 
Client 1:
Client 2:
Client 3:
Reviewer 4:
Reviewer 5:
1-marginal     2-ok    3-good     4-very good    5-outstanding

Innovativeness and potential of Hole in Space storyboard

Client 1:

Interesting! How does this reset?

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Client 2:

An important factor to keep in mind, all Open World experiences must be self-resetting. At no time will a staff member enter the room to "undo" what the last group did and put the game back into the original starting state. Can this idea be designed in a way that makes it self-resetting?

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Client 3:

This could be a good mystery challenge. I especially like the use of the air gag. I think it's a really effective application in that it's low-risk (there are really no safety considerations) and high-reward (it immediately evokes every space movie you've ever seen).

I think you can do away with the lock box and tool kit - too many independent pieces that would need to be manually replaced in their original locations to reset the room. I think there is a way to design this so that the patches adhere to the wall, and that there are A, B, and C solutions. That way when visitors solve the room, they can just leave the patches where they are, then the room is already set up as "unsolved" state for the next solution.

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Reviewer 4:

'Hole in Space' is innovative in its ability to inspire teamwork and it's potential for some extreme spaceship theming. I really like how the game involves a lot of teamwork- both mentally in discovering what the toolbox contents do and physically in matching patches to seal holes. I also like how the game fits really well with the space/spaceship theme- this means there is a lot the 5 Wits team can do in terms of theming/decorating the room to look like the inside of a spaceship. My one concern is that this game involves a lot of moving parts (patches, rods, wrench) and it might be hard to make this game self-resetting for that reason. On solution to this problem could be a virtual hole repair that could be programmed with special effects instead of a physical repair.

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Reviewer 5:

The storyboard itself is quite clear - I did not have trouble following the premise of the experience. It's also well drawn. I think the gag follows the general theme quite well. The gag itself follows a theme that I think is quite common in these types of game experiences where you find a key, and need to use that to open a door that presents tools that you need to use to do something else. That being said, I like how it is applied to the theme and I think the concept of patching holes in a space is quite exciting.

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Innovativeness and potential of Asteroid Aversion storyboard

Client 1:

This seems like it could work. Are they physical wires or is this a touch-reactive table with a monitor in it? (Also, what's a 'puffer?')

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Client 2:

There's a lot of various ideas going on at once. Pick one strong concept and push that forward.

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Client 3:

I like the sense of urgency here - much like the bomb-defusing game in Espionage. I have to confess that I'm still not sure what a puffer is. Maybe that's your term for an unknown sci-fi device that you use to avoid asteroids? I think this can go one of two ways - either it's a dexterity/speed game where you have to coordinate button presses between group members to maintain a certain puff levels (think of trying to inflate a tire that has a hole in the side - you have to keep ahead of the deflation), or it's a mental game where you have to figure out which combination of button presses give you the right levels, like the fuses game in Espionage.

Whichever way you choose, I would try and make sure that this is closely tied to your theme. Maybe the puffers are thrusters, and the concept is that you're navigating the ship out of the way of the asteroid?

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Reviewer 4:

There seem to be three different "mysteries" or "puzzles" a team of player needs to solve, first is the discovery of the light switch, the second is the color matching game on the table, and the third is adding puff. I would suggest eliminating one of the three, or decreasing the difficulty of one of the three, since 5 Wits is aiming for a 2-5 minute game. One easy way to achieve this is by adding flashing pointers to the light switch, or by making the light switch very large and obvious.

My favorite game of the three is the color matching game because it requires some thought but is still a game that is fun and challenging across a wide age range. I'm not sure that "puffers" are ubiquitously associated with spaceships for most people, so maybe a change in terminology could be helpful.

I LOVE the ending of the game- watching the asteroid fly by is a great way to give some positive feedback/reward for solving the room. This is definitely the best feature of the room in my opinion.

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Reviewer 5:

This one made me think a little. I like the design of the storyboard - I think it's well drawn out and planned. In terms of the innovativeness, I have the same feedback as the last one. The gag follows a theme that is not uncommon, but I do like the application of it to the space adventure theme. One idea that I had was instead of just connecting wires, connect tubes, and when you connect the tubes to the correct lights, air flows through the tubes and somehow that air increases the puffer levels.

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Innovativeness and potential of Space Walk storyboard

Client 1:

How does this reset?

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Client 2:

I would suggest making this more of a puzzle rather than an activity. What do they have to figure out? Are there certain bolts that can only go in certain holes? Are their special wrenches that they need to figure out which go to which bolts?

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Client 3:

This fits very well thematically. I really like the idea of moving the solar panels into the light to achieve the goal - it's easy to reset using the multiple-solutions concept mentioned above, and offers lots of hands-on manipulation for a whole group. Again, I'd do away with the wrench. Make the panels slide-able and tilt-able, and I think you'll achieve exactly the same thing without needing to worry about someone walking off with the wrench and making the game unsolvable.

One thing you might want to think about is to how to scale up the difficulty of this game. A time limit might work (don't let the power levels get to zero!), or maybe you could require several different configurations in a row to solve the puzzle.

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Reviewer 4:

I like the element of using light to escape the room, it makes this game unique from the others.

Again, there is the problem of "resettability" with this game if there are moving parts (wrench, bolts) used to solve the game. One solution could be that the solar panels are fixed (but movable) on the wall, and players just have to rotate them to face the spotlight. Once the players leave, the solar panels rotate back to home position.

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Reviewer 5:

I love this one! I really love the fact that you have to interact with a light - I haven't seen that before. I think it has a lot of potential and it's quite novel as well. The design and sketching of the storyboard was very good.

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Storyboard design and website presentation and execution

Client 1:

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Client 2:

Some of these storyboards referenced color, yet they were in black and white. Color can be so helpful in conveying your concept!

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Client 3:

The theme comes across well in your storyboards. I think Space Walk is your best/clearest example. As mentioned above, I'm a bit unclear on what the elements are in the Asteroid game, but it gets enough of the concept across that it's not a huge problem.

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Reviewer 4:

For 'Hole in Space', your descriptive captions make it very clear what's going on in each storyboard scene. There is also a great use of grayscale markers to differentiate between different room elements- like wall/floor/panels. I would suggest you enlarge the O2 panel in the first storyboard scene, to distinguish between a "fake" O2 decrease as seen on a panel, and a room gag that actually involves people noticing low O2 levels from breathing (what I initially thought after reading caption). Very nice close-ups in storyboard scenes 3-6 that allow the reader to visualize important items/props involved in the room.

For 'Asteroid Aversion', again, really nice use of wide-view room scenes and some scenes with close-ups on relevant items/actions. Nice use of hands in storyboard scene 3 and 5 to convey player actions. I think more detail on the table needs to be drawn, because the difference between the table electrical map, the wiring on the wall, the puffer button screen, and the puffer display levels is not clear. Is the puffer button screen also on the table?

For 'Space Walk', very clear and easy to tell what is going on based on scene drawings and captions. Very nice use of grayscale and close-ups.

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Reviewer 5:

As noted in the previous sections, the storyboard design and clarity of each of the experiences is very good. The steps that teams would have to take to solve the puzzle was very clear and the rooms were nicely drawn.

In terms of the website, what could be helpful is if you included a "back to top" link at the bottom of each storyboard. It would also be helpful if you included the name of the storyboard below the options up top.

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Room theme, Space Adventures: engaging and interesting? identifiable with target users?

Client 1:

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Client 2:

Space is such a great theme. There are so many things that can be done to match this theme. Try to find games that really complement this theme.

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Client 3:

I think the theme is excellent. Who doesn't want to be an astronaut? It's a broad concept that is culturally very accessible for all age ranges.

My one overarching comment is that you have a lot of different game elements in each of your rooms. For example, in Asteroid Aversion, there are three separate puzzles to solve: the light switch, the electrical map, and the puffers. That's a lot! I think you could focus on just one of the latter two and have a complete game. It's tempting to keep adding elements for visitors to interact with, but it's better for the budget and user experience to save those elements for a different room.

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Reviewer 4:

Yes, the Space Adventures theme provides great potential for spaceship-themed games that can involve a lot of room theming and decor. Most people in the 15-35 age range will have enough experience with movies to identify with and be excited by the though of being inside of a spaceship. This theme definitely lends itself to more mental/puzzle type games rather than physical. I think the main two challenges with this theme, based on Justin's three storyboards, is creating resettable games, and making sure there are not too many puzzles per room.

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Reviewer 5:

I think everyone goes through a "I want to be an astronaut" phase and this is a great way to revisit to that sentiment.

I like that the gags all have a physical component as well as a mental one, which allows everyone to participate and makes it a more engaging and interesting experience.

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