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User Experience Storyboard Reviews
Home > Assignments > User experience storyboard results > Reviews for Vadim Kuklov

Vadim Kuklov
she wolf
[review]

 Circuit Virus Contagion storyboard design/website Cyberspace
Average Rating
 
Client 1:
Client 2:
Reviewer 3:
Reviewer 4:
1-marginal     2-ok    3-good     4-very good    5-outstanding

Innovativeness and potential of Circuit storyboard

Client 1:

This looks like fun! Asking players to discover all of the interactions between the various components with only go, no-go feedback may be too difficult though. Perhaps a list of instructional statements printed into the 'silkscreen' of the circuit board would be helpful? Things like "the resistor with color bands red-blue-green must be next to the transistor with three legs".

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Client 2:

I love that the floor is lit up in a line going to the game board - that's a great use of indirect control to get the guests to move where you want them to go. The floor being dark on the other side of the game board is a good way to teach the players that they can't get out until they solve the board.

Are players able to solve the puzzle by figuring out which line types go with which pieces, or is it guess and check using whatever fits in the holes? It's ok either way, I just can't tell from the storyboard. Also, how exactly do the components affect each other? You can't know if you got a component right until you got all previous components right, because only then will the light travel to the component? If so, this makes it difficult for multiple people to work on the puzzle at the same time. But, if you changed this to accommodate multiple people putting pieces in at once, it could be really good gameplay. You would also have to design two ways for the components to go in the board, so that when one group leaves a room after putting all the components in, the components are not already in the right place for the next group - the next group has to change to a new configuration.

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Reviewer 3:

1. Looks like there aren't too many clues to solve the assembly of the light board. So its mostly going to be hit and trial I assume. Maybe there is a way to give some sort of clues which tell participants about specific positions of the components so its more mentally stimulating.

2. If the components are left in the final position, the room would not be self-resetting (unless I'm missing something). An idea would be to have the teams realize that they just assembled a time bomb and they need to unassemble all the components once its done to stop the timer.

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Reviewer 4:

This is a great puzzle. My favorite things about it are that it's interactive and interdependent. Additionally, the light-as-communication is another great design feature into itself. I'm wondering how the components need to be rearranged; if it's actually like a Circuit that might be isolating to some users who don't understand circuits. If "circuit" is still the theme of the puzzle, how might you design some of the pieces to appeal to users of different education levels, or different types of components (tactile, visual, brain teasers), etc? Your quick 3D drawings in this storyboard are really nice, I especially like the way you have drawn the people.

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Innovativeness and potential of Virus storyboard

Client 1:

This game is great! Visually interesting lighting combined with the need to run around a smack things will make for a really exciting experience.

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Client 2:

I love this mechanic. It encourages people to all play the game at the same time, instead of just observing. Since the lines on the walls aren't just going straight down, it will also be fun to try to track the red light and know where it will go so you can get to the correct button to stop it.

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Reviewer 3:

1. The # of "red things" should be limited so that a team of 3 can possibly deal with it.

2. Also, I'm not super clear on how the team loses. Does the team lost of any one of the red things reach the core or do they win if they limit atleast one of them from reaching the core? And do they need to keep holding onto the button to stop it or do they just tap it once and its done? Might be worthwhile to include some commentary on this in the storyboard.

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Reviewer 4:

This is a really unique idea! I like that you've taken something that's not visible (since it happens inside a computer) and make it three dimensional. Also, I think to my comment above about the accessibility, a visual presentation of a virus spreading is really easy to understand. It's also cool that the puzzle affects the entirety of the whole room and it's not just one element within the room. There seems to be a lot you can do here with texture and three dimensionality, especially as you suggested with hitting the button in the storyboard.

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Innovativeness and potential of Contagion storyboard

Client 1:

This idea seems a little trickier to design such that the group is able to stop the spread, but the containing it is not trivial, especially if done at early choke-points. Maybe all paths have only one or two pressure pads?

Perhaps the virus can try, but occasionally retreat from many different paths over the course of the game to give the gameplay a sense of progression?

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Client 2:

Forcing people to play twister is fun! This one would require a lot of playtesting to make sure you have the right amount of buttons and paths, so that it's really hard to prevent the virus from spreading to the other side, but you can do it if you've had enough practice. Also, you'd have to start the virus spreading from multiple locations, not just one place - otherwise people can just step on one of the early buttons so the virus can't spread from there, and be done.

I really like both this one and the second one, but you are correct that they are similar - if you go forward with either of these, just pick one.

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Reviewer 3:

Same comments as the last one - make sure the challenge is doable by a team of 3 and still interesting enough for a team of 5.

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Reviewer 4:

Super creative! I prefer the Virus scenario to the Contagion scenario, just for accessibility sake. This would be great if you are dealing with athletic younger people but some others might not have the agility to move around or play a crazy twister game. This could be fixed potentially by having new elements come out at a moderate pace so nobody is running or doing any super flexible body positions. Again, I like that this one is a 3D puzzle similar to the Virus storyboard. I would be stoked to be in any of these rooms- they're all really unexpected but fun and interesting experiences! The idea that you could visualize or be inside what happens in a computer is very modern, stimulating and though provoking.

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Storyboard design and website presentation and execution

Client 1:

The visual design conveys the concepts described very clearly. Well done!

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Client 2:

Your drawings are simple but make it clear what is happening, so it was easy to understand. Like I told your teammates, I prefer explanatory text to be typed rather than written, but you specifically have neat enough handwriting that it's not a huge deal. Also, it would be great if I could navigate between the storyboards in some way other than scrolling. Finally, it would be a huge help if you would title or number your storyboards so we don't get into problems like "What did she mean when she said 'the second one'?"

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Reviewer 3:

Overall, all the idea fall under the cyberspace theme and have elements that tie them together. There is some ambiguity in the "Virus" storyboard which you could work on just by adding a little more commentary.

In terms of the website, might be useful to have links to all three at the top so people who don't scroll all the way to the bottom don't miss it.

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Reviewer 4:

I like your website header- hilarious! Also it was really easy to read as a continuous web page with full-width storyboards. And, I really appreciated that the storyboards had consistent style and coloring between them. It felt like all were in unison.

My personal thought is you might not need the small bits of intro text at the top- I think (which is a good thing) that your drawings speak for themselves.

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Room theme, Cyberspace: engaging and interesting? identifiable with target users?

Client 1:

I think that most of the target audience will be able to easily connect to this theme.

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Client 2:

Yep, engaging and interesting. People towards the top of the age spectrum will definitely know Tron, people in the middle will remember growing up with Reboot, and people towards the bottom will know Wreck-it-Ralph. The concept of being inside a computer is always fascinating.

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Reviewer 3:

Overall the theme is interesting, engaging for various age groups and is followed throughout the three storyboards. The challenges just need to be made in a way to engage a team of 3-5 people.

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Reviewer 4:

Yes, this room theme is AWESOME. The only overarching thought I have is to think about accessibility. This idea is certainly interesting, but consider that the audience might be varied in terms of their athleticism and their knowledge of circuits and experience. Is there a way to engage everyone, regardless and make sure makes people feel clever and not lost?

I also want to add that I really love your drawing style- the sound effects and use of different marker weights painted a really clear, moving picture.

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