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User Experience Storyboard Reviews
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Lucia Liu
organic finger food
[review]

 Advice from a Caterpillar Mad Tea Party The Queen storyboard design/website Alice in Wonderland
Average Rating
 
Client 1:
Client 2:
Reviewer 3:
Reviewer 4:
1-marginal     2-ok    3-good     4-very good    5-outstanding

Innovativeness and potential of Advice from a Caterpillar storyboard

Client 1:

I think this could be simplified into just the tall/short concept, removing the "make the caterpillar angry" piece. I'm not sure that part adds very much except an allusion to the movie.

The combination of pressure plates to unlock the door is good. I wonder though if you're limiting the flexibility of the game by essentially hard-coding the short vs. tall positions. Could it be that the caterpillar gives hints about which tiles to press, and they're hidden around the room? That way you could scale the difficulty of the game via the show control system. I would also think about how this game works with the multiple star system. If you can turn it into a speed/dexterity game ("Quick, press the tile before he gets too angry!") that will help with grading, as well as with making it a more collaborative game.

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Client 2:

Very unique gameplay. The doorknob feedback will be key, as the solution is hard to guess without that.

Have you considered different failure mechanisms? Does time cause you to loose if you can't follow these clues, or is there a set of actions that are not allowed at certain times.

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Reviewer 3:

The use of changing colors and glowing is a nice way to immerse the user into the experience. The connection between the walls vs. the caterpillar growing red may be a bit confusing. For example, if in the movie the caterpillars grows red perhaps they should in the room as well. A group that isn't familiar with Alice in the Wonderland may struggle with what they are supposed to do - they may believe they are simply in an enchanted forest. Perhaps think of ways to drop specific clues about Alice in the Wonderland, like the cat grinning in the corner of the room? This may help people figure out the clue within 5 min.

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Reviewer 4:

Good:

- I like the intricate features to fully immerse the players into the theme

- simple game that is easy to understand

Bad:

- quite tough for someone to get the references especially if you are not familiar with the theme (like me). However, this doesn't affect the game play

- since the door is only unlocked when someone tries to open it, people may not try the door knob during tall/short game. Personally, I would be expecting the caterpillar to respond if I got the correct combination of tiles.

Suggestions:

- Perhaps link the tall/short concept to a more relevant game or response? For example the mushroom can grow taller/shorter depending on the number of tiles.

Questions:

- Do the tiles need to be activated such that both sides form a mirror image of each other? or just any number of tall and short tiles must equal each other?

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Innovativeness and potential of Mad Tea Party storyboard

Client 1:

Jigsaw puzzles are tough to auto-reset. What if the clock was broken in that it is difficult to set? You could have multiple buttons around the edge of the clock that adjust the hour/minute/second hands in weird multiples (+7 minutes, - 5 hours, etc.) and you work together to get the hands into the correct target position? This is a bit similar to the light puzzle at the beginning of Espionage, if you remember that.

One note about the physical space: you are using a very small part of it to actually play the game. That's a lot of theming to do! Think about ways to have players interact with more of the space (multiple clocks? explore the space to find the rabbit-hole exit?)

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Client 2:

I love the "re-assemble the watch" part of this challenge! Designing out how that will physically work will be difficult, but the required teamwork of holding some parts while others are installed could be great. The concept and theme align very well.

Have you considered including documentation or hints for the non-mechanically inclined groups?

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Reviewer 3:

The scene here is very interesting - it's easier to figure out that you are in an Alice in the Wonderland theme. WIll have to consider the size of the clock, in order to have 3-5 people be able to work on the clock together. Or perhaps introduce another challenge in the storyboard since in reality the clock fixing is easiest for a group of ~2 to do. The storyboard doesn't cover a reset, but if there's a way to make the clock explode when you enter the room it would provide a "Wow" factor and take care of resetting the challenge.

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Reviewer 4:

Good:

- I like the references to the movie/story

- I like how the game requires everyone to work together to solve it

Bad:

- The jigsaw puzzle doesn't sound like an easy thing to reset

- The door look which can be removed from the door doesn't seem like an easy thing to reset as well

Suggestions:

- Perhaps you can involve the Mad hatter and the white rabbit in the game? Similar to how the caterpillar provided hints in the first storyboard.

Question:

- Not sure how fixing the clock would be like a jigsaw but it sounds interesting.

- How will they know if the clock is fixed or not? Only when they try to press the button?

- Why would the group hear the clock sounds (tick tock) when the clock is broken? Maybe get the white rabbit to complain about his broken watch?

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Innovativeness and potential of The Queen storyboard

Client 1:

I love language puzzles (and a good pun!) - personally, I would play up that aspect of it and maybe eliminate the roses piece. My concern about this room is that it really doesn't have any replay value, or a way to score visitors along the three star scale. I like the "That way" signs a lot. Maybe there could be multiple solutions (requires breaking from the book canon a bit...) or hidden "That way" signs that you have to search for.

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Client 2:

The two part design of this game is nice, as both puzzles are fun but too simple to last 2-3 minutes. The 'roses' puzzle can be made more exciting by adjusting which roses light in order to create difficult-to-touch pattern or comical stretches.

The arrow puzzle is great, in that it feels obvious after the fact but would still take a moment to solve.

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Reviewer 3:

Great use of the theme and a storyline that fits well - especially the "all ways are the queen's way". Easy for people to understand even if they haven't watched Alice in the Wonderland. It is unclear if the users need to be holding on the roses at the same time they are moving the arrows towards the queen? Could make this challenge more physical by spreading out the roses or making it more like a rock climbing wall - otherwise fairly easy to touch all roses at the same time.

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Reviewer 4:

Good:

- interesting use of the features in the story as props for the game

- easy to reset

Bad:

- Due to the room name, I will be naturally draw first to the queen. Looking at the arrows, I would be able to guess the game even without the hint from the roses. This means I could technically leave the room without even playing the rose game

Suggestions:

- perhaps make the arrows turnable only after the rose game is completed?

- make the same concept that the arrows would turn back to their original positions when released. Hence, the group has to work together to solve it.

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Storyboard design and website presentation and execution

Client 1:

Nice artistry in your sketches - I'm very impressed by your gears in particular!. Make sure you have some sense of the scale of the room in your drawings (how big is that table really in the Mad Tea Party room?). Also, a very minor point, but I find that mint green color pretty difficult to read against a white background.

Otherwise, very well done!

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Client 2:

This storyboard layout is very clear and concise. Great Job!

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Reviewer 3:

Fantastic website! Well designed, no bugs and very clear use of colors. The storyboard drawings are also very clear with the right about of detail in order to understand what is happening. The description of the project also adds necessary context that helps with understanding the storyboard.

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Reviewer 4:

Storyboard Design:

Good:

- the designs are really crisp and well fleshed out

- they really help me to visualize the concept well and understand how the game goes.

Bad:

- Would be good to have failure situations so that I will be able to visualize what would happen to the players when they fail the mission.

Website Design:

Good:

- minimalistic and straight to the point.

- I enjoy the consistency in the theme across the whole website.

- Overall, very pleasing to look at with the material presented wonderfully.

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Room theme, Alice in Wonderland: engaging and interesting? identifiable with target users?

Client 1:

I have to confess that this is not my favorite theme, even having seen the movie and read the book. I think it runs the risk of alienating players that have no exposure to either, even if the games themselves don't require it. I think players will be more likely to give up and assume that they are missing *knowledge*, rather than skill, if they are aware that the game is referencing the real Alice in Wonderland story.

Others may disagree, however! Talk it over with your group.

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Client 2:

I think this theme is very recognizable and fun, provided there are no major IP conflicts for 5-Wits to overcome!

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Reviewer 3:

I think Alice in the Wonderland is a great theme for building wow factor and transporting the user to another world. Only concern is if the room requires actual knowledge of having watched the movie. One way to address this is to think of more popular scenes that the general public may know of. For e.g. I havent watched the movie but am aware of the queen, cards, and the cat. If I understand correctly parts of the movie are quite dark/disturbing. You could bring these feeling in with lighting and dramatic music in order to build drama for the user. For example a loud ticking noise for storyboard 2 that builds up the closer they get to running out of time.

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Reviewer 4:

Personally, I wouldn't enjoy such a theme since I'm not as familiar with the story. But looking at the target audience, I believe that the room has potential due to the immersive experience that the players will experience. Alice in Wonderland has a wonderful backdrop of entering a totally different world which is so apt for the concept of Open World.

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