2.744
User Experience Storyboard Reviews
Home > Assignments > User experience storyboard results > Reviews for Pushpaleela Prabakar

Pushpaleela Prabakar
she wolf
[review]

 Connect the Map Power the Machine Print the Key Code storyboard design/website Vintage Industrial Machines
Average Rating
 
Client 1:
Client 2:
Reviewer 3:
Reviewer 4:
1-marginal     2-ok    3-good     4-very good    5-outstanding

Innovativeness and potential of Connect the Map storyboard

Client 1:

Hiding the key in such a way that it can't be found with a quick search might be tricky, especially if it needs to be found using only some simple visual clues from the drafting tools.

Perhaps the pieces of paper can be replaced with hard puzzle pieces which index into the table top? The positions of tiles and tools could be sensed, and the key hiding spot mechanically revealed after successful assembly.

You could also skip the second key altogether and simply unlock the exit door after a successful solve to eliminate the need for a reset mechanism.

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Client 2:

It's hard for me to review this one, because I don't really know what vintage drafting tools look like, and the storyboards don't make that super clear - it mostly looks like people are putting squares together. Also, I don't understand what the keys have to do with the rest of the puzzle. Do they look like keys, or do they look like machine parts (and the players just use them as keys)? What do the keys unlock? The last key unlocks the door - what about the rest of them? It would also be difficult to reset this puzzle before another group came in to play - how would you move the drafting tools to be scattered again, and move the keys back to their hiding places? Reset should be able to happen automatically, without employee interference.

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Reviewer 3:

The storyline is very interesting mainly due to its inspiration in the Charles River Museum. In my opinion, every time we can possibly merge culture and history within the gag, you gain not only by allowing the participant to have this time travel feeling but also by making the gag have cultural value for the participants. In terms of implementation, the only critical point would be the key that unlocks the door. How can you make this self-resettable? From the engineering point of view, I don't really see any easy solutions for that... So maybe consider changing the door unlock mechanism. Besides that, you can easily make the environment very immersive and you also might not struggle with lack of space, so no problems there.

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Reviewer 4:

It is quite innovative. Finding clues and keys are quite normal in a theme game. However, it is quite rare to get the clue by drawing lines and making sure locations of the keys.

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Innovativeness and potential of Power the Machine storyboard

Client 1:

Simply stepping on three pedals at the same time may not be exciting enough a challenge, despite the cool-factor of seeing a physical belt hopping from pulley to pulley.

Perhaps a slightly different gameplay can be overlayed on the look and feel of pedals powering pulleys? Perhaps something like whack-a-mole where you need to stomp the lit pedals quickly, saving the belts and pulleys for a visual payoff after success?

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Client 2:

I really like the idea of players using foot pedals to power machines. It's not something people are able to do in everyday life. I think it is important for something to happen when all of the wheels are operated in the right order, to reward the players for getting it right - but I'm not sure that thing should be the pulley/key machine. As discussed before, the room has to be able to reset itself before the next group. How would you do that with this effect? Additionally, how would you prevent guests from just taking the key with them when they leave?

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Reviewer 3:

Again, appreciate the cultural/historical linkage of the storyline, but in this case, I would be alert for the fact that the gag might be too easy to accomplish. If I did understand the room composure, you have only 3 wheels, with 3 active pedals, so analyzing it from the mathematical point of view, you have 3*2*1 = 6 possible sequences to make the 3 wheels spin in the right order, and if you have more than 3 minimally organized participants in the room, they should be able to beat the room within 2 or 3 minutes. Therefore, I would either add more spinning wheels or add a completely new gag also connected to the wheels in order for the participants beat the room.

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Reviewer 4:

It is quite impressive and innovative. People should decide which three pedals to put to run the belt and get the key. Several parameters could be adjusted: which three pedals to use, how fast to step the pedals, etc. Possibly the number of pedals to step could also be changed depending on how many people join the game. Overall, such theme provides many degrees of freedom for the game.

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Innovativeness and potential of Print the Key Code storyboard

Client 1:

It seems to me that the players will know the code during the assembly phase of the game, rather than at the big reveal moment of printing. Perhaps the character blocks can be made into puzzle pieces that lock into the printer, but in a orientation that leaves the message unreadable until completion?

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Client 2:

I like the mechanic of putting letters in a typeset machine: people have seen those machines in history books but have never been able to play with them before. However, there is a fundamental problem with the way you're giving the players the answer to your puzzle. You want them to unscramble a sentence. Your example sentence is "Key is 928." I could see guests being able to unscramble "Key is," but how are they going to get "928"? The digits 9, 2, and 8 could form the number 928... but they could also form 298, or 289, or 829, or 982. How are guests supposed to know which code you want them to use? And once the group has the correct sentence, why is it necessary to print it out?

Resetting the game is also a question here. Once the keys are unscrambled and placed in the typesetter, how are you going to scramble them again and scatter them around the room for the next group?

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Reviewer 3:

I literally loved this storyline idea. Mixing the typeset machine with the action of unlocking the door is - in my opinion - the cleverest way you found to accomplish your goal of making the "participants to get a feel of how it would be to use these vintage machines to generate the keys/codes to exit the room". However, I still worry about the difficulties you will find when trying to make the gag be self-resettable... How are you going to make the missing letter blocks go back to their initial hidden positions? Essentially, that is the same problem with the key of the first storyboard, but in this case, you definitely can not change the letters blocks for any other mechanism, or it would ruin the entire gag idea. Therefore, what I suggest is: try to think of an alternative way of making the typeset puzzle. Maybe, substitute the "missing letter blocks hunt" part by a mental puzzle in the typeset machine.

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Reviewer 4:

It is innovative, but not as impressive and potential as the previous two ones.It is still like the traditional detective games, collecting and processing all the clues and getting the final password. The tiny difference may be that the machine could print the final password. The core of the game is classical, but not quite potential.

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Storyboard design and website presentation and execution

Client 1:

The storyboards were understandable, but might be improved by including more details about the way various game elements fit into a unified room.

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Client 2:

It would help me understand your drawings more if they had more detail. For example, I could understand the game with drafting tools better if I knew what you were envisioning that the drafting tools would look like, instead of just four squares. Personally I prefer explanatory text to be typed, but your handwriting is clear enough that I can understand it, so it's not a huge deal.

Also, it would be nice if I could navigate between the storyboards instead of just scrolling.

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Reviewer 3:

Overall score would be OK in my opinion. Some elements of the storyboard are a little hard to understand, for example, the spinning wheels, the drafting tools, and the metalwork machines. My suggestion would be to work with more perspective 3D drawings instead of 2D. 2D is very effective when trying to represent the room blueprint or a simple informational indication - like a speech balloon - in the drawing, but using it in every occasion make the reading experience quite frustrating for the reader.

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Reviewer 4:

The storyboard delivers clear message but the drawing quality needs improvement. I saw some pencil traces.

The top part of the website is impressive and delicate. It explains the source of the idea clearly. However, it is not quite user-friendly to scroll all the way down to see all the three storyboards. If there is some index on the top and people could turn to the page by clicking the index, it could be more convenient.

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Room theme, Vintage Industrial Machines: engaging and interesting? identifiable with target users?

Client 1:

I think that many players in the target audience will not have seen these types of mechanisms in the past, and won't easily be able to relate to the theme. While the vintage aspect is pretty neat historically, it may be better in the long run to transition to a more general "industrial" theme.

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Client 2:

Yes, it works. While a lot of work happens digitally nowadays, people are still fascinated with mechanical machines. Rube Goldberg machines easily capture the attention of anyone who sees them, and this theme gives players not just the ability to watch machines in action, but the ability to power them - which is pretty cool.

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Reviewer 3:

As previously mentioned, I think the "Vintage Industrial Machines" theme is very interesting, mainly because of this cultural and historical merge with the gag. Even though this might be more interesting for older participants - lets say 20+ years old - I wouldn't worry much about that.

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Reviewer 4:

The theme is engaging and interesting. Initially the topic of vintage machine is attractive to male players and people who love history and mechanical world. The game is challenging and needs coordination, like the pedals in the second theme.

Yes, the theme is quite straightforward. People could play the game mostly by intuition. The possible puzzle may be the pedals in the second game. It is hard for people to decide how many pedals they need to step on. Without some hint, they may get confused and just try the pedal one by one.

The game cannot auto-reset as people need to put keys and letters back to the state of out-of-order. One bonus point is that the game does not need electricity.

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