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User Experience Storyboard Reviews
Home > Assignments > User experience storyboard results > Reviews for Ryan Zimmerman

Ryan Zimmerman
6 wits
[review]

 Pandora's Box Escape from Hades Ascend to Mt. Olympus storyboard design/website Greek Mythology
Average Rating
 
Client 1:
Client 2:
Client 3:
Reviewer 4:
Reviewer 5:
1-marginal     2-ok    3-good     4-very good    5-outstanding

Innovativeness and potential of Pandora's Box storyboard

Client 1:

I liked the concept till Hydra; then it lost me... Was this concealed in the room before? Where did the sward come from? Hitting the set pieces with a sward is also not the greatest for the longevity of the exhibit components. I think that sensing a selfie could be difficult. Also relies on guest having a cell phone?

I like pacify Cerberus... Perhaps this is all that needs to be done to close Pandora's box? What are good interactive ways to play a song to Cerberus that will enable the life of the box to close?

Also, Things in the middle of a room are really hard to wire and secure...

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Client 2:

Simplify your ideas. There's way too much going on. The Pandora's Box idea is clever, but the game after that needs some work.

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Client 3:

Interesting! I like the idea of pandora's box. I'm not sure how we make sure that the box stays open. The room needs to automatically reset in between groups, and we can't guarantee what state the guests will leave the room when they exit.

How do you battle a hydra with a sword, exactly? Where does the sword come from? How do we guarantee it gets put back? How does the hydra not get bashed to bits by the guests after a few attempts?

How do we sense that guests have taken a selfie with Medusa? How is Medusa represented in the room?

I love the idea of pacifying cerberus with music - that seems like something fun and unique. How would that work, and how is cerberus represented in the room?

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Reviewer 4:

I thought the concept of the Pandora's Box is a really interesting one. Your web design is really clean and contemporary, and does a lot with very little (which is a good thing, I mean it's relatively straightforward function-wise, but the graphics make it fresh and modern).

Regarding the storyboard of the Pandora's box, it was rather unclear to me how this storyboard would play out in the reality of a 5-Wits setup. For example, can the users just open the box at will? How big is the box? Stuff has to fit into it, unless there are special effects involved. And at that point, is the next logical step really to try to close the box? It is in the story, but practically speaking I'm not sure that'd happen.

I *love* the selfie with Medusa. That's great. I would actually put that one last because it's such an awesome closer. Will someone with no background in Greek mythology know to do the rest though?

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Reviewer 5:

I think his Pandora's box storyboard has a lot of potential for ideas since the box is itself filled with a variety of evil things.

How will the gags reset? I'm just thinking about the one where you have to stab the hydra with a sword.

For the sake of immersion, I think it might be better not to take selfies because I fear it will transport the user out of the immersive experience. Particularly since phones are very distracting.

This storyboard has a clear point of completion (the box will close itself), which is one of the elements of a successful interactive challenge.

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Innovativeness and potential of Escape from Hades storyboard

Client 1:

I think there could be enough in the challenge without the boat part... Getting from one side of the room to the other without touching the floor on holds, ledges and ropes could be very fun!!

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Client 2:

These rooms are physically small. There might not be enough room to make all of your ideas happen. The physical challenges are neat. Try to choose one or two of your strongest concepts to focus on.

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Client 3:

I like this! I think a projector and a motion capture system like a kinect could pull this off. I think you could simplify this to one or two steps and it would easily fill the 3-5 minute requirement.

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Reviewer 4:

I thought this storyboard made more sense on how it could be implemented. It's pretty scary, which I loved. Is it possibly dangerous, though? What happens if the user falls (in the game sense as well as in reality, like does it trigger a "failure" or "game over" as well as could they actually get hurt)?

Excellent use of shading, I could really feel myself inside the game on this one.

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Reviewer 5:

Overall, this room has great potential, especially since it has a dark underworld theme. One can take advantage of a dark atmosphere, with fog, and creepy music.

This storyboard did a good job with incorporating team work, particularly where the last player gets stranded and need help from another player in operating the crank to mobilize the boat.

One thing to keep in mind might be the danger associated with having users balance their way through the poles.

I think it might be helpful to have something for the other players to do (the ones who are waiting for the person in front of them to pass through to the other side). Maybe there can be two dynamic maps instead of just one to enable more collaboration with the verbal instructions.

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Innovativeness and potential of Ascend to Mt. Olympus storyboard

Client 1:

Seems inventive. Interesting story line... Is the scepter one of the pieces of gear from fallen hero's?

How would you fit this story into a 150 sq ft room?

I like connecting the lightning to light bouncing to blinding a hydra.

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Client 2:

An important factor to keep in mind, all Open World experiences must be self-resetting. At no time will a staff member enter the room to "undo" what the last group did and put the game back into the original starting state.

The bouncing the light is a fun idea.

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Client 3:

How does this all reset?

How does this all fit on one room? I think you have too much going on here.

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Reviewer 4:

This storyboard I thought was the best of your three. The idea of having to scale a mountain is great, and this can be built similarly to American Ninja Warrior or Chuck E Cheese or something. It seems relatively clear what the flow is. I was confused though, but the initial panel versus the rest. I had thought there'd be a challenge of trying to climb something, but then it seems the challenge is actually returning various objects to their owners, Zeus on a dais, etc. If that's the case, I am not certain it would be particularly challenging, but I like the idea.

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Reviewer 5:

This room has good potential. Maybe you can utilize more gags that relate to "ascending" such as a rock climbing wall, ladders, stairs, etc.

I like using the shields to redirect the light, I find that pretty innovative. But will the light beams get into people's eyes? Just want to make sure they don't get blinded by the light beams.

How will this gag be made into different difficulty levels?

Perhaps you can incorporate static charge for a sensory experience as it relates to being struck by lightning (maybe when a player makes a wrong move).

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Storyboard design and website presentation and execution

Client 1:

I liked the home screen and wish that I was taken back there after completing each room. Clicking through the middle room to get back to the first room was a little inconvenient.

Focus on penmanship. When it is difficult to read the words the point of the storyboard gets lost a little.

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Client 2:

The overall designs were clear. There were so many concepts going on in each storyboard that it did create confusion at times.

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Client 3:

Great use of storyboards - but just one little graphic design faux pas, being the white text on the light grey background.

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Reviewer 4:

Your website is excellent. Clean and crisp, modern but not in a stark way, and not too simple either. Great buttons!

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Reviewer 5:

The website was well executed in that it featured a "Next" button at the bottom. This allows the reader to only use one click to get to the next storyboard instead of two clicks (going back to the main page and then going into the next storyboard). This is useful when you have a slow internet connection and don't want to wait for more pages to refresh.

The website had a clean modern look. Maybe it could have looked more like ancient Greece though, with columns and ruins.

The storyboard design conveyed the emotions of the users, particularly in Pandora's Box where the user had a difficult time closing the box once it had been open.

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Room theme, Greek Mythology: engaging and interesting? identifiable with target users?

Client 1:

I think it is a lofty Theme. There is a lot here but it needs to be brought to lowest cannon denominator then made robust and structure built around it...

Could require lots of custom sculpting and be very expensive to construct...

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Client 2:

Greek Mythology is such a classic theme (literally). Try to find a "classic" game that can be re-purposed to integrate into this idea.

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Client 3:

I love the ancient greek theme, and I think it'll be great for our guests.

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Reviewer 4:

I think that most people will be able to relate to these themes, although some may not be intellectual enough to be aware of some of the concepts. I wasn't sure how the implementation would look on certain portions of the storyboards (e.g. what exactly springs out of the box when you open it and is the logical reaction actually to try to close it or to run away?). One option to try would be to focus on a very specific component of each of the story boards and expand that to be the challenge, as it seems like in the Pandora and Mount Olympus situations that you may be including a lot of different concepts into a small space. However, I love the utilization of the classic.

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Reviewer 5:

I believe most people have some sort of experience or exposure to greek mythology (mainly from school). This means that teenagers as young as 15 would be able to understand or at least be familiar with greek mythology and it would also be of interest to those who are 35 too.

Greek mythology has so many stories to choose from that it can definitely lend itself to interesting play experiences. The scenes and characters from greek mythology can provide the "wow factor" that is needed when producing a room.

Additional comment: It would be nice if you could include the greek alphabet in one or some of the challenges.

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