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ResearchslashSRA 03

Project 3.4.1: Advanced Computational Tools for Multi-scale Modeling and Simulation of Multi-Threat Protective Systems

The main objective of this project is to develop and validate advanced large-scale simulation capabilities to enable high-fidelity full-scale simulations of the effect of blast and ballistic impact loading on soldier protection material systems. We will expand our previous efforts to model the complex mechanical response of protective materials with particular emphasis on micromechanical processes leading to macroscopic damage (e.g. ductile and brittle fracture, delamination in composites). The approach will be to develop novel computational tools to bridge the scales from atomistic to the continuum in order to improve our fundamental understanding of dynamic material failure behavior under extreme loading conditions (blast and ballistic loadings). One of the main goals will be to understand the role that multi-scale structuring of hybrid material components may play in the management of stress waves resulting from intense loads. Materials components under consideration will include: ceramics (e.g. alumina) and polymer based (e.g. polyethylene based: Dyneema/Spectra). An important goal is to assist and support the Army in critical material research activities. To this end, our project involves strong collaborations in research and transitioning to ARL and ERDC.

 

Project 3.4.1 Researchers

Prof. Raul Radovitzky, Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics
Prof. Markus Buehler, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering


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