Physics Spotlight  
MIT postdoc Cui-Zu Chang works with equipment that can monitor topological insulator thin-film quality as it grows. The bright green vertical bar on computer screen is an indicator of very high-quality film growth. Chang led work in the Moodera group showing the first zero-resistance edge state in a circuit. Photo: Denis Paiste/Materials Processing CenterMIT postdoc Cui-Zu Chang works with equipment that can monitor topological insulator thin-film quality as it grows. The bright green vertical bar on computer screen is an indicator of very high-quality film growth. Chang led work in the Moodera group showing the first zero-resistance edge state in a circuit.
Photo: Denis Paiste/Materials Processing Center

Achieving zero resistance in energy flow

MIT postdoc Cui-Zu Chang makes a spintronic breakthrough in the Moodera group.

Denis Paiste | Materials Processing Center
May 6, 2016

Laptop computer users operating their devices on their laps will be familiar with the heat they generate, which comes from electrical resistance converting waste energy to heat. Scientists dream of creating electronic devices with little or no resistance to the flow of electricity, in order to reduce heat output, save energy, and extend device capabilities. In the last several years theorists and experimentalists have been trying to achieve this goal using extremely thin materials with special physical properties, called topological insulators (TIs). Recently there has been a breakthrough towards this goal: Dissipationless flow of current has been achieved in TIs when it enters a quantum state without any external magnetic fields — although, as of now, only at extremely low temperatures, its potential can be significant if the operating temperature could be raised.
Read full story >>