Physics Spotlight  
“In about 30 seconds, we can scan a container and provide a three-dimensional map of [the materials inside the cargo]. This information clears the container or alerts you to a region that needs to be examined more carefully,” says William Bertozzi, MIT physics professor emeritus and co-founder of Passport Systems.“In about 30 seconds, we can scan a container and provide a three-dimensional map of [the materials inside the cargo]. This information clears the container or alerts you to a region that needs to be examined more carefully,” says William Bertozzi, MIT physics professor emeritus and co-founder of Passport Systems.

Improved threat-detection

Scanners more rapidly and accurately identify radioactive materials at U.S. borders, events.

Rob Matheson | MIT News Office
June 22, 2016

In response to the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, the U.S. government founded the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) to prevent terrorist attacks on American soil. Among other things, the DHS increased screening of cargo coming into the country.

At the same time at MIT, the terrorist attacks gave rise to a company dedicated to helping DHS — and, ultimately, other governments and organizations worldwide — better detect nuclear and other threats at borders and seaports.
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