Jeanne Guillemin

Jeanne Guillemin’s training in medical sociology and anthropology at Harvard and Brandeis Universities has led to her involvement in issues regarding unusual infectious diseases (including anthrax, SARS, the Ebola virus, and MERS) and biological and chemical weapons. She is the author of Anthrax: The Investigation of a Deadly Outbreak (University of California Press, 1999), which documents her epidemiological inquiry into the controversial 1979 Sverdlovsk anthrax outbreak in the USSR. With a MacArthur Foundation writing award, she next wrote Biological Weapons: The History of State-sponsored Programs and Contemporary Bioterrorism (Columbia University Press, 2005) a valued course text. Her 2011 book, American Anthrax: Fear, Crime, and the Investigation of the Nation's Deadliest Bioterrorist Attack (Macmillan/Henry Holt, 2011), offers a thorough account of the 2001 letter attacks that changed national policy regarding bioterrorism. Her current book project explains how Imperial Japan's use of biological weapons during World War II failed to be prosecuted at the Tokyo war crimes trial, 1946-1948.  In addition to consulting and lecturing, she was a member of the World Economic Forum's Global Agenda Council on WMD (2009-2013), serves on the board of Transaction Books, and is an associate of the Harvard-Sussex Program on chemical and biological weapons disarmament.