Spring 06

The Mosque in the West

(back to Lectures)


Paolo Girardelli

The Architecture of the 'Eastern Question': Diplomacy and Space in Late Ottoman Istanbul

Biography

Paolo Girardelli is an assistant professor in the History Department of Bogaziçi (Bosphorus) University, Istanbul,Turkey.He received his Ph.D. in History of Architecture from the University of Naples Federico II, with a thesis focusing on the Italian presence in the architecture and urban structure of late Ottoman Istanbul. His publications include articles and proceedings on western perceptions of Ottoman architecture, on the multicultural environments of Istanbul and Alexandria in the 19 th and early 20 th century, as well as on the contribution of Italian and Levantine architects and patrons to the transformation of Istanbul on the eve of modernity.

Paolo's forthcoming article on Muqarnas XXII, based largely on materials from the archives of Propaganda Fide, is a contextual reading of cross-cultural influences, including the role of Armenian converts to Catholicism in the architecture of the Catholic establishments in Istanbul. His graduate courses at Bogaziçi University focus on issues of identity and space production in the eastern Mediterranean region during the past two centuries, while his research at MIT will be a critical evaluation of the role of diplomacy in shaping the built environment of Istanbul, in the context of the so-called "Eastern Question".


Mahmoud Hawari

The Citadel of Jerusalem Revisited: An Architectural and Archaeological Investigation

Biography

Dr. Hawari has joined AKPIA as a postdoctoral fellow for the academic year 2005-06. He just completed the first year of the 3-year Abduljawad Fellowship at the Khalili Research Centre for the Art and Material Culture of the Middle East, University of Oxford. Currently, Dr. Hawari is working on a research project: The Citadel of Jerusalem, and Archaeological and Architectural Study . His previous research (Ph.D. thesis) dealt with the architecture of Ayyubid Jerusalem (1187-1250).