PAST PUBLICATIONS

 

Making Cairo Medieval
eds. Nezar AlSayyad,
Irene Bierman,
and Nasser Rabbat

The Citadel of Cairo:
A New Interpretation
of Mamluk Architecture

Nasser O. Rabbat

The Culture of Building
and Building Culture:
Essays and Articles on
Criticism and History
of Architecture. 1985-2000.

Nasser Rabbat, in Arabic

 

Bukhara: The Myth
and the Architecture
Conference Proceedings

Typological Process
and Design Theory

Conference Proceedings

Rethinking the
XIXth Century City

Conference Proceedings

Sefarad, Architettura
e Urbanistica Ebraiche
dopo il 1492

Edited by Attilio Petruccioli

Work in Progress:
The Syria Workshop:
Dead Cities
Heritage Corridor

MIT Workshop

Der Islamische Garten -
Architektur. Natur.
Landschaft

Edited by Attilio Petruccioli

Contemporary Mosque,
Architects Clients and
Designs Since the 1950s

Renata Holod and
Hasan-Uddin Khan

The Topkapi Scroll: Geometry
and Ornament in Islamic Architecture

Gulru Necipoglu


 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

 

     

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Der Islamische Garten - Architektur. Natur. Landschaft.
edited by Attilio Petruccioli. Deutsche Verlags-Anstalt, Stuttgart, 1995.

Compared to the studies on Western gardens the Islamic garden is arelatively unknown phenomenon. After the pioneering studies by C.M. Villiers-Stuart, Stella Crowe, Donald Wilber, and RichardEttinghausen, this book aims to introduce new parameters,such as the relation between garden and territory, garden and agriculture, and the construction of the typological processes forthe garden. It ends with a reappraisal of the role of the paradisegarden and excessively simplistic notions like the so-called chaharbagh.



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Sefarad, Architettura e Urbanistica Ebraiche dopo il 1492.
edited by Attilio Petruccioli. Dell'Oca Editore, Como, Italy, 1995.

The essays collected in this volume retrace the connection of the complex web of relations created by the Sephardic imagination. The book does not aim to define all the components of the dialectic between the Sephardic world and the local cultures. The main purpose of the book is to establish whether the sophisticated and cosmopolitan Sephardic culture expressed its own architectural and urbanistic tradition prior to the second half of the nineteenth century.



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Contemporary Mosque, Architects Clients and Designs Since the 1950s
Renata Holod and Hasan-Uddin Khan. Rizzoli International, New York, 1997
.
The book features over 70 mosques built since the 1950s throughout the Islamic world and for Muslim communities in other countries. Traditionally the mosque is the first permanent structure to be built in a Muslim community, serving as its physical and spiritual center. Since the end of the colonial era and the creation of independent Muslim nations, a significant number of new mosques have been built throughout the Islamic world and in the West many have been built to serve the communities whose growing numbers now make Islam the second largest religion in North America.
The Contemporary Mosque presents a beautifully illustrated look at the current state of the art in this traditional building-type which has been interpreted afresh by some of the world's most prominent architects. It is a fascinating book for professionals and students, and anyone interested in the physical expression of Islam in the modern world.



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The Citadel of Cairo: A New Interpretation of Mamluk Architecture
Nasser O. Rabbat. E. J. Brill, Leiden, 1996.

This study of the citadel reconstructs its architectural history within the urban context of Cairo and the wider framework of Ayyubid and Mamluk institutions, polity, society, and tastes, and it proposes new interpretations of the most significant elements in Mamluk royal architecture. "Far more than just a chronology of architectural remains, Rabbat's book is an exploration into the very fabric of Mamluk culture, written in the best historian tradition."
Yasser Tabbaa, ARS Orientalis, 26, 1996.
"The great merit of this book is its approach, which always connects the architecture with its social and historical setting, seeking the function it was created to fulfill and the circumstances that accompanied its evolution, making it intelligible and interesting,"
Doris Behrens-Abouseif, Mamluk Studies Review, 1997.



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The Topkapi Scroll: Geometry and Ornament in Islamic Architecture
Gulru Necipoglu. The Getty Center for the History of Art and the Humanities, Santa Monica, CA, 1995.
Precious few architectural drawings and no other theoretical treatises on architecture remain from the pre-modern Islamic world. One exceedingly rich and valuable source of information, however, is the Timurid pattern scroll in the collection of the Topkapi Palace Museum, examined here by Gulru Necipoglu. In this book, Necipoglu undertakes an in-depth analysis of this unusual pattern scroll and sheds new light on architectural design in the Islamic world between the tenth and sixteenth centuries. She also makes an insightful comparison between the Islamic understanding of geometry and that found in medieval Western art. Oleg Grabar, the eminent historian of Islamic art, characterizes Necipoglu's book as "meticulously researched, intelligently put together, and imaginatively conceived ‚ a masterpiece that establishes our understanding of why geometry became so important in Islamic art." This large-format volume, the inaugural publication in the Sketchbooks & Albums series, reproduces the scroll's 114 patterns entirely in color. It also includes an extensive catalog with illustrations showing how individual patterns were created from incised geometric designs and an essay by architectural historian Mohammad al-Asad which discusses the geometry of the muqarnas and demonstrates how one of the scroll's patterns could be used to design a three-dimensional vault.

 

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Work in Progress: The Syria Workshop: Dead Cities Heritage Corridor.
edited by Reinhard Goethert and Attilio Petruccioli.

This is the third issue of the 'Work in Progress' and presents the results of the MIT workshop focused on the Dead Cties of Syria. The overall goal of the workshop was to link architecture, planning and social and economic development components. as a secondary goal, it provided a background for possible application of the Dead Cities area as a UNESCO World Heritage Monument. The so-called 'Dead Cities' of northern Syria west of Aleppo, which were prominent in the 5th century before their mysterious disappearance, provided the context for the workshop. A two-week field trip was organized in the summer of 1997 to provide the primary resource in the study. Subsequently, in Fall 97 a workhop was held, where various issues were debated and preliminary strategies were organized. The workshop was offered jointly by SIGUS- Special Interest Group in Urban Settlement - at MIT and the MIT Aga Khan Program of Islamic Architecture.

 

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Bukhara: The Myth and the Architecture
Edited by Attilio Petruccioli.[1999]
This third volume of AKPIA conference proceedings features the following articles:

How Ancient is Bukhara?" R. Frye;
"What Arabic and Persian Sources Tell Us about the Structure of 10th Century Bukhara," H. Gaube;
"Coins of Ancient Bukhara," E. Rtveladze;
"The size of Samanid Bukhara: A Note on Settlement Patterns in Early Islamic Mawarannahr,"A. Naymark; "Lower Layers of Bukhara: Characteristic of the Earliest Settlements," E. G. Nekrasova;
"Between Conservation and Innovations: The Central Plan of Bukhara," F. Ashrafi;
"Bukhara and Its Hinterland: The Oasis of Bukhara in the 16th Century in the Light of the Juybari Codex," F. Schwarz;
"Bukhara's Suburban Villages: Juzmandun in the 16th Century," R. Mc Chesney;
"Evolution of Architecture of the Sufi Complexes in Bukhara," M. Yusupova;
"Suburban Ensembles of Bukhara," N. H. Sharipov; "The role of Bukhara in the Creation of the Architectural Typology of the Former Mausoleums of Mavarannahr," G. A. Pugachenkova;
"Bukhara form the Russian Conquest to the Present," A. Gangler;
"The Soviet Interpretation and Preservation of the Ancient Heritage of Uzbekistan: The Example of Bukhara," M. Azzout;
"An Atlas of Building Elements in the City of Bukhara," A. Petruccioli;
"Revitalization of the Heritage of Uzbekistan," B. Usmanov.

 

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Typological Process and Design Theory
edited by Attilio Petruccioli.
Proceedings of the international symposium sponsored by the Aga Khan Program for Islamic Architecture at Harvard University and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, March 1995.

Contributors include:
Attilio Petruccioli, "Exoteric ? Polytheistic ? Fundamentalist Typology: Gleanings in the Form of an Introduction";
Sylvain Malfroy, "Urban Tissue and the Idea of Urban Morphogenesis";
Giancarlo Cataldi, "Designing in Stages: Theory and Design in the Typological Concept of the Italian School of Saverio Muratori";
Attilio Petruccioli, "Alice's Dilemma"; Francesco Giovanetti, "Typological Process Towards Urban Rehabilitation: The Manuale del Recupero of Rome";
Giuseppe Strappa, "The Notion of Enclosure in the Formation of a Special Building Type";
Serge Santelli, "The Central Space in North African Architecture";
Karl S. Kropf, "Typological Zoning";
Anne Vernez Moudon, "The Changing Morphology of Suburban neighborhoods";
Peter J. Larkham, "Urban Morphology and Typology in the United Kingdom";
Maurice Cerasi, "Type, Urban Context, and Language in Conflict: Some Methodological Implications."

 

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Rethinking the XIXth Century City
Edited by Attilio Petruccioli
Proceedings of the international symposium sponsored by the Aga Khan Program for Islamic Architecture at Harvard University and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, April 1996.

Contributors include:
Attilio Petruccioli, Introduction;
Julian Beinart, "Form and Application in the XIXth Century City";
Hidenobu Jinnai, "The Modernization of Tokyo during the Meiji Period: Typological Questions";
Pierre Pinon, "The Parceled City: Istanbul in the XIXth Century";
Roy Strickland, "Between Party Walls: XIXth Century New York Residential Architecture and Urbanism";
Attilio Petruccioli, "Polarity and Antipolarity in the Formation of the XIXth Century City";
Giuseppe Strappa, "Continuity and Innovation in Building Types in XIXth Century Apulian Town Fabrics";
N. John Habraken, "The Power of the Conventional";
K. S. Kropf , "Plot Types and Housing in XIXth Century Westminster";
J.W.R. Whitehand, "Continuity and Discontinuity in the Urban Landscape: A Geographer's View";
Jean Castex, "The Typological Character of the Buildings Around Garnier's OpÈra in Paris, 1861-1913";
Sylvain Malfroy, "The Modern Completion of the XIXth Century Fabric Based on the Grid and Blocks: Case Studies from Industrial Towns in Switzerland";
Brenda Scheer, "Typology and Urban Design Guidelines: Preserving the City Without Dictating Design.

 

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Thaqafat al Bina' wa Bina' al-Thaqafa:
Buhuth wa Maqalat fi Naqd wa Tarikh al-'Imara. 1985-2000
Nasser Rabba
tThe Culture of Building and Building Culture: Essays and Articles on Criticism and History of Architecture. 1985-2000) (Beirut: Riad Alrayyes Publisher, 2002).

 

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Making Cairo Medieval
eds. Nezar AlSayyad, Irene Bierman, and Nasser Rabbat
During the nineteenth century, Cairo witnessed one of its most dramatic periods of transformation. Well on its way to becoming a modern and cosmopolitan city, by the end of the century, a _medieval_ Cairo had somehow come into being. While many Europeans in the nineteenth century viewed Cairo as a fundamentally dual city--physically and psychically split between East/West and modern/medieval--the contributors to the provocative collection demonstrate that, in fact, this process of inscription was the result of restoration practices, museology, and tourism initiated by colonial occupiers. The first edited volume to address nineteenth-century Cairo both in terms of its history and the perception of its achievements, this book will be an essential text for courses in architectural and art history dealing with the Islamic world.

 

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Thaqafat al Bina’ wa Bina’ al-Thaqafa (The Culture of Building and Building Culture) (Beirut: Rayyes Publishers, 2002) Nasser Rabbat, in Arabic
This is a collection of essays written between 1985 and 2001 that range from a critical review of the notion of Islamic architecture to exposés on paradigmatic buildings in Islamic history. The book is divided into five sections. Section one deals with historical criticism in architecture. Section two focuses on the cultural and environmental aspects of architecture. Section three investigates the historical functions of architecture, while section four presents three case studies of urban conservation in the Arab world. Section five contains a number of short journalistic articles and observations related to the author’s personal experience. The book has been well received by Arab reviewers and adopted as textbook by several schools of architecture in the Arab World.