black & red mit image

 

Pre-Game Meals

It takes 30 minutes to days before what is eaten contributes to performance, thus the importance of adequate glycogen stores so don’t count on the pregame meal to supply all your source of energy for the day’s game .

The glycogen stores you will primarily be using for the game are a result of the type of diet you’ve had for the past several days, as well as the amount of rest, and also the intensity, frequency and duration of exercise sessions you’ve had the previoius few days. Light exercise and rest as well as the ingestion of nutrient dense high carbohydrate foods will increase the levels of stored glycogen. Starchy foods are best.

Prior to a competition allow 1 hour for a small snack & a high carbohydrate beverage, 2-3 hours for a small meal and 3-4 hours for a large meal to digest. Factors that slow down food absorption are the amount of fiber in the food and dehydration.

Eating foods high in sugar prior to competition results in a temporary increase in energy but quickly leads to a fast drop in energy because the body increases insulin production in response to the ingested sugar; this lowers blood sugar levels and results in decreased performance. Its that sluggish tired feeling that happens after feeling energized just minutes before. Once glycogen stores are exhausted, it may take one to two days to restore them. Eat starchy foods to help increase your stores of glyocogen. See post-game meal.

Tips for the Pre-Game Meal:

Examples of Pre-Game Meals:

Breakfast:

1. 1 cup of cereal (non-sweetened)

Banana

8 oz. of milk (low fat, skim or soy)

1 slice of toast with 1 Tbsp of jam or jelly

6 oz. of juice of choice (not prune)

Water

2. 1 egg

1 slice of toast with 1 Tbsp of jam or jelly

8 oz. of milk (low fat, skim or soy)

6 oz. of juice of choice (not prune)

Water

3. Pancakes, french toast or waffles (2 pieces or slices) with 1 Tbsp of syrup, jam, or jelly

½ cup Applesauce

8 oz. of milk (low fat, skim or soy)

6 oz. of juice of choice (not prune)

Water

4. 8 oz. of low-fat yogurt with handful of fresh fruit

1/2 English muffin with 1 Tbsp jam or jelly

6 oz. of juice of choice (not prune)

Water

5. Peanut butter and honey on whole grain bread

Orange

Water

6. Carbohydrate Energy Bar

6 oz. of juice of choice (not prune)

Boiled egg

Water

Lunch:

1. Any of the choices from above may also be used for a lunch meal as well as breakfast.

2. Turkey sandwich (whole grain bread and lettuce)

Apple

8 oz. of milk (low fat, skim or soy)

6 oz. of juice of choice (not prune)

Water

3. 8 oz. of low-fat or fat free cottage cheese with pineapples or peaches

Breadsticks or a dinner roll, no butter or margarine

8 oz. of milk (low fat, skim or soy)

6 oz. of juice of choice (not prune)

Water

4. Large slice of mushroom pizza, thick crust

Apple or Orange

8 oz. of milk (low fat, skim or soy)

Water

Dinner:

1. 1 cup spaghetti with 1/4 cup tomato sauce

1 Dinner roll, plain

1/2 cup steamed vegetables, plain

1/2 cup grapes

Water

2. 1 baked potato with tsp of margarine

1/2 cup steamed vegetables, plain

Bread ( 1 slice), plain

Orange

8 oz. of milk (low fat, skim or soy)

Water

3. 1 cup vegetable chow mein

1 cup rice, plain

1 Slice of whole grain bread with 1 Tbsp jam or jelly

Pear

8 oz. of milk (low fat, skim or soy)

Water

4. Toasted cheese sandwich ( whole grain bread, 2 slices of low fat cheese food)

Tomato slices (1 whole)

1/2 cup steamed vegetables, plain

Apple or banana

8 oz. of milk (low fat, skim or soy)

Water

References

Bonci L. Nutrition Conditioning Goals for Athletes. University of Pittsburgh Medical Center Health System. 2004.

Clark N. Sports Nutrition Guidebook.(3rd Ed.) Human Kinetics. 2003.

Home

Last updated 11/11/2006 by MIT Sports Medicine: K. Davis

Copyright 2005 by MIT

red & gray mit footer