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MIT Course Catalog 2013-2014

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Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering

The Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering focuses on interactions between human activities and the natural environment. Its mission is to use science, engineering, and policy to improve quality of life and sustain environmental systems. This includes intelligent use of natural resources such as the raw materials, energy, and ecosystems needed to sustain modern society. It also includes the design of functional and environmentally compatible facilities and infrastructure. Within this broad context, the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering is especially concerned with:

  • Understanding of natural cycles, systems, and processes relevant to human activities
  • Use of natural analogs to help design new materials, industrial processes, and infrastructure systems
  • Development of new building and transportation technologies
  • Advances in information infrastructure and logistics
  • Creation of attractive and sustainable physical environments

An education in civil and environmental engineering provides an excellent foundation for careers in fields as diverse as engineering design, education, law, medicine, and public health, as well as for graduate study in engineering and science. Our graduates teach and carry out research in universities, work for large firms, start their own businesses, and take positions in government and nonprofit organizations. As pressures on limited natural resources grow, there will be increasing demand for engineers who understand how to make best use of these resources in the products and services they design. The department's undergraduate program recognizes this need by providing background in science and engineering fundamentals while also emphasizing hands-on design projects and case studies that provide context and motivation. Students are taught how to combine theory, measurement, and modeling to develop a good understanding of the problem at hand and to point the way to desirable solutions.

The department offers two designated undergraduate degrees accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of ABET, http://www.abet.org/. The Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering provides a solid foundation for practice in both classical and newly developing areas of civil engineering, including structural analysis and design, engineering materials, geotechnical analysis and design, sustainable built environments, and transportation and logistics. The Bachelor of Science in Environmental Engineering Science emphasizes the fundamental physical, chemical, and biological processes necessary for understanding the interactions between man and the environment. Issues considered include the provision of clean and reliable water supplies, flood forecasting and protection, development of renewable and nonrenewable energy sources, causes and implications of climate change, and the impact of human activities on natural cycles. Both programs provide awareness of the sociopolitical context in which civil and environmental engineering problems are solved. Premedical students may satisfy medical school entrance requirements while earning the accredited degree in environmental engineering science with proper planning of their program. A third degree is offered for students who want more flexibility. Typical examples are students who will pursue careers in medicine, law, or scientific research.

The undergraduate programs in civil engineering and environmental engineering science share a common sophomore year that emphasizes mathematics, mechanics, ecology, and design. The ecology sequence begins by considering how natural systems work and then turns to a consideration of interactions between these systems and human activities. This sequence provides a scientific context for a consideration of sustainable design in subsequent subjects. Sophomore students from all programs work together in teams on design projects that synthesize concepts taught in the core subjects. In the junior and senior years, students from the two programs concentrate on disciplinary subjects that provide depth in each specialty. During the final term of the senior year, all students come together again in an advanced design subject that integrates lessons learned throughout the undergraduate education. There is ample room in the program for electives and minors that can be used to tailor each student's program to individual needs.

The department offers advanced degrees within the broadly defined areas of environmental science and engineering (which includes environmental chemistry, environmental fluid mechanics, environmental microbiology, and hydrology and hydroclimatology), geotechnical engineering and geomechanics, mechanics of materials and structures, and transportation. The depth and breadth of coursework and research required differ for each degree program.

The degrees offered are Master of Engineering (MEng), Master of Science in Transportation (MST), Master of Science (SM), Civil Engineer's degree, Doctor of Philosophy (PhD), and Doctor of Science (ScD).

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Undergraduate Study

The Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering offers three undergraduate programs: Course 1-C, leading to the Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering, Course 1-E, leading to the Bachelor of Science in Environmental Engineering Science, and Course 1-A, leading to the Bachelor of Science as recommended by the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering.

Each of these programs is flexible enough to allow students to pursue special interests by taking additional subjects in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering and in other departments. Undergraduates are encouraged to participate in the research activities of the department and in many cases obtain degree credit for such work.

In general, students find advantages in planning their programs for the third and fourth years so that they dovetail with possible graduate study, including the department's Master of Engineering degree. This is readily accomplished by those students who embark on the departmental program in their second year. Under certain circumstances, students are permitted to work toward receiving simultaneous undergraduate and graduate degrees.

Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering/Course 1-C
[see degree chart]

The 1-C curriculum helps students develop abilities in problem formulation, problem solving, and decision making in civil engineering. Education towards this goal involves learning fundamentals, exercising creativity, and gaining hands-on experience. Specifically, the program includes subjects dealing with structures, materials, computation, and project evaluation. These are complemented by design subjects that teach students to handle open-ended problems through involvement in increasingly complex team-oriented projects. Unrestricted electives and advanced restricted electives are typically used to build depth in focus areas of interest to the student.

The 1-C program provides the education necessary for professional practice in civil engineering as well as a number of other fields. It also provides a solid foundation for graduate studies, which is designed to further develop the professional engineering skills of Course 1-C students. This program is accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of ABET, http://www.abet.org/.

Bachelor of Science in Environmental Engineering Science/Course 1-E
[see degree chart]

The 1-E option is designed for students who wish to gain an in-depth understanding of the physical, chemical, and biological processes that control natural and engineered environments and their interactions with human activities. Subjects in environmental transport and hydrology share a laboratory that emphasizes both practical skills and the use of measurements to test hypotheses. Similarly, the environmental chemistry and biology subjects are accompanied by a laboratory that introduces methods for relevant measurements in ecosystems and engineered systems. Unrestricted electives and advanced restricted electives are typically used to build depth in particular areas of interest to the student.

The 1-E program provides the education necessary for careers in environmental engineering and science, as well as in many other fields. It also gives a solid foundation for graduate study and research in both basic and applied environmental disciplines. The 1-E program is accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of ABET, http://www.abet.org/, and is sufficiently flexible to prepare students for careers in medicine or environmental law.

Bachelor of Science as Recommended by the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering/Course 1-A
[see degree chart]

The degree of Bachelor of Science as recommended by the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering (Course 1-A) is provided for those students who are drawn to the core features of our curriculum but want to design individualized programs to meet particular educational objectives. For example, a student interested in medicine may need more room in the curriculum in order to complete all the subjects required for medical school admission. Other students interested in research careers in fields such as microbiology, geochemistry, oceanography, or environmental law may want more time for advanced subjects in those fields. Such students may benefit from a Civil and Environmental Engineering 1-A degree, since they do not need ABET accreditation but do need flexibility. Students should speak with a faculty advisor about the advantages and limitations of a 1-A degree before making a final decision.

There are seven required 1-A subjects that coincide with the sophomore core of the 1-C and 1-E programs. In addition, 1-A students must select a coherent set of seven electives that meet a well-defined educational goal (e.g., a premedical sequence). The planned electives are developed in consultation with and are approved by a member of the departmental faculty who serves as the student's academic advisor. Planned electives may be selected from subjects within the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering or outside the department. In addition, students may write an undergraduate thesis in lieu of one or more of the planned electives. To satisfy the CI-M component of the Communication Requirement, students must take the department's two CI-M subjects (1.013 and 1.018J) or, if appropriate, take one Course 1 CI-M subject and petition the Subcommittee on the Communication Requirement to substitute one CI-M from another science or engineering field. The outside CI-M must fit into the coherent program of electives approved by the student's academic advisor. The remaining part of the 1-A program consists of unrestricted electives to bring the total to 180 units beyond the General Institute Requirements.

Undergraduate Summer Internship Program

Sophomores and juniors majoring in civil and environmental engineering may apply to participate in the Undergraduate Summer Internship Program, coordinated by the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering. The internship program helps MIT students find summer employment opportunities with companies and agencies engaged in civil and environmental engineering. For more information and a partial listing of companies and agencies that students have worked with in the past, see the Summer Internship Program description on the departmental website at http://cee.mit.edu/undergraduate/internships/.

Undergraduate Practice Opportunities Program

The Undergraduate Practice Opportunities Program (UPOP) is a full year co-curricular program that focuses on the knowledge, tools, and analytic frameworks students need to effectively translate their classroom training in science, math, and engineering into thriving leadership careers of their own design. UPOP is a School of Engineering program open to all sophomores, regardless of major. UPOP provides students with academic training, practical experience, networking opportunities, and mentor relationships, along with individually tailored coaching and team challenge activities. With guidance from UPOP faculty and staff, MIT alumni, and industry professionals, students obtain meaningful summer internships in commercial, government, and nonprofit sectors in the US and abroad. UPOP's 6-unit curriculum serves as the foundational year of the Bernard M. Gordon-MIT Engineering Leadership Program. Further information is available from the department in which the student is registered; from Susann Luperfoy, executive director, Undergraduate Practice Opportunities Program, Room 12-193, 617-253-0055, mobile 617-921-3931, luperfoy@mit.edu, upop@mit.edu; or from http://upop.mit.edu/.

Electives and Research Opportunities

A list of undergraduate electives in civil and environmental engineering may be obtained from the department http://cee.mit.edu/undergraduate/courses/. Students registered in the department are encouraged to consider appropriate subjects offered by other departments as part of their elective programs.

Students wishing to work closely with a member of the faculty on research may obtain permission to register for thesis, or to enroll in 1.999 Undergraduate Studies in Civil and Environmental Engineering. Numerous possibilities for UROP projects exist in the department, and several UROP traineeships are awarded to undergraduates each spring.

Minors

The Minor in Civil Engineering consists of the following subjects:

1.050 Engineering Mechanics I
1.060 Engineering Mechanics II
1.101 Introduction to Civil and Environmental Engineering Design I
1.102 Introduction to Civil and Environmental Engineering Design II
1.035 Mechanics of Structures and Soils
  and
1.041 Transportation Systems Modeling
  or
1.036 Structural and Geotechnical Engineering Design

The Minor in Environmental Engineering Science consists of the following subjects:

1.018J Ecology I: The Earth System
1.020 Ecology II: Engineering for Sustainability
1.101 Introduction to Civil and Environmental Engineering Design I
1.102 Introduction to Civil and Environmental Engineering Design II
1.080 Environmental Chemistry
1.107 Environmental Chemistry and Biology Laboratory
  and one of the following three subjects:
1.801J Environmental Law, Policy, and Economics: Pollution Prevention and Control
11.002J Making Public Policy
14.01 Principles of Microeconomics

Substitution of equivalent subjects offered by other departments is allowed, with permission of the minor advisor. However, at least three full subjects (12 units) must be Course 1 subjects.

For a general description of the minor program, see Undergraduate Education in Part 1.

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Graduate Study

The Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering grants the following advanced degrees: Master of Engineering in Civil and Environmental Engineering, Master of Science in Transportation, Master of Science, Master of Science in Civil and Environmental Engineering, Civil Engineer, Doctor of Science, and Doctor of Philosophy. The Institute's general requirements for these degrees are described under Graduate Education in Part 1. Detailed information on the departmental requirements for each degree may be obtained from the Academic Programs Office, Room 1-290.

Master of Engineering

The Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering's Master of Engineering (MEng) is a nine-month program that provides a practice-oriented education with a focus on real-world engineering challenges. It is designed for people with a bachelor's degree in engineering (or related field) who want to enter or return to professional practice. Our graduates routinely join leading engineering design firms, consulting companies, and government agencies. Some go on to pursue a PhD. The distinctive element of the program is a professional practice experience comprising a group project and an individual, practice-oriented thesis.

MEng students specialize in one of four tracks: environmental and water quality engineering, geotechnology, high-performance structures, or transportation.

All students, independent of specialty area, take 1.133 Concepts of Engineering Practice, during the fall term. In this subject, students work in teams to develop and present solutions to realistic professional problems, which include project management and evaluation, negotiation, business development, and ethics. In addition, each specialty area has three suggested core subjects, two planned electives, and one free elective.

Because of their intensive coursework, MEng students do not have time to work as full-time research or teaching assistants. Some engage in part-time work, but we urge caution as this can drain time away from academic work. A limited number of partial-tuition fellowships are awarded on a merit basis.

Admission standards are the same as for the Master of Science degree. Strong communication skills are expected. MIT undergraduates may apply to the program at the end of their third year.

For more information, see the Master of Engineering program description on the department's website at http://cee.mit.edu/master-of-engineering.

Master of Science and Doctoral Degrees

Programs of graduate study are available in the following areas: environmental chemistry, environmental fluid mechanics, environmental microbiology, geotechnical engineering and geomechanics, hydrology and hydroclimatology, the mechanics of materials and structures, and transportation.

The program in environmental chemistry focuses on processes governing the fates and effects of natural and anthropogenic chemicals. Quantitative knowledge is commonly sought using chemical measurements made in controlled laboratory experiments, as well as in environmental samples of air, water, sediments, soils, and biota. Such data are synthesized within mass balance models so as to anticipate how the combination of chemical transport and transformations result in human and ecosystem exposures. Knowledge of the mechanisms that regulate the cycling of materials through natural and man-made ecosystems is essential to address and avoid environmental problems.

Environmental fluid mechanics considers the physical processes associated with water and water motion that are essential to the understanding, protection, and improvement of the environment. The program includes theoretical, numerical, experimental, and field studies, which range in scale from the swimming of microorganisms to the transport of carbon dioxide through the global ocean basin. While rooted in the fundamental analyses of fluid physics, our projects are guided by practical problems in environmental science such as the protection of coastal water quality, the prediction and mitigation of coastal erosion, and the restoration of channels and coastal zones.

Environmental microbiology focuses on microbial properties and processes that define the structure and function of natural and man-made ecosystems. Water is a key medium through which energy and elements are transported within and between ecosystems, and it is also a conduit for the transport of anthropogenic materials and waste. Because microorganisms are the primary living constituents of aquatic ecosystems and mediate globally important processes, we focus on environmental microbiology. Our studies are grounded in microbial genomics, physiology, ecology, evolution and environmental science and engineering. This program emphasizes PhD-level research.

Geotechnical engineering and geomechanics addresses a wide range of problems posed by the spatial variability and complex material properties of soils and rocks. Geotechnical engineers are dealing with the design and construction of major infrastructure projects ranging from tunnels to offshore structures, and with natural hazards from landslides to earthquakes. Geoenvironmental problems of subsurface waste containment, groundwater contamination and site remediation are also a major focus of the profession, as are problems related to resource extraction, including engineered geothermal systems.  The graduate program includes core subjects in soil mechanics; engineering geology and groundwater hydrology; application subjects involving geotechnical and geoenvironmental problems; and specialized subjects in geomaterial (soil and rock) behavior, theoretical and experimental methods, and underground construction.

Graduate study in hydrology and hydroclimatology considers all aspects of the hydrologic cycle, with an emphasis on better understanding the physical, chemical and biological processes associated with the movement of water. Our goal is to give students the knowledge they need to address important environmental and resource challenges and to develop informed solutions that improve quality of life. Hydrologic education and research are inherently multidisciplinary and typically involve integration of theory, data analysis, and modeling. Students develop expertise in the basic sciences, applied mathematics and, depending on their research topic, in laboratory and field research, mathematical modeling, economics, and public policy. This program emphasizes PhD-level research.

The graduate program in the mechanics of materials and structures emphasizes fundamental understanding of, and innovative approaches to, structural engineering problems. This includes assessing and upgrading aging infrastructure, developing and using better construction materials, and designing for increased performance by improving safety, lowering costs, and reducing the impact on the environment. The program also emphasizes the mechanical behavior of construction materials and mechanics of materials at scales ranging from nano to macro, relating the continuum scale to the atomistic scale.

Graduate study in transportation examines all major forms of transportation, including passenger and freight systems, as well as the increasing demand for transportation systems at the local, regional and international levels. Projects and coursework consider the critical issues involved in meeting transportation needs in a sustainable way, considering all modes of transportation where appropriate. The interdisciplinary Transportation program, based in CEE, emphasizes the complexity of transportation and its dependence on the interaction of technology, operations, planning, management, and policy making. Our focus includes study of the interactions of transportation infrastructure and operations, urban spatial structure and land use, economic growth, resource and energy use, and environmental impacts at various spatial and temporal scales.

Entrance Requirements for Graduate Study

The primary requirements for graduate study are a strong intellect and the ability and interest to pursue rigorous, focused study. Applicants do not need an undergraduate degree in civil engineering. For students with backgrounds in other branches of engineering, science, and certain social sciences, numerous research opportunities exist for interdisciplinary research that brings people of complementary backgrounds together in search of solutions to major societal problems. For example, graduate students and faculty in the department have experience in geology, chemistry, physics, biology, computer science, economics, political science, sociology, architecture, urban and regional planning, and management.

All applicants are required to submit scores from the GRE Aptitude Test. With some exceptions, applicants whose first language is not English are required to submit scores from either the International English Language Testing System (IELTS), the preferred exam, or the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL). More information about individual graduate programs can be obtained at http://cee.mit.edu/ or by writing to cee-admissions@mit.edu.

Financial Assistance

The research of the department is an integral part of the graduate program, and approximately 150 graduate students each year receive appointments as research or teaching assistants. Most of these appointments fully cover tuition, individual health insurance, and reasonable living expenses in the Boston area.

Applicants are encouraged to apply for traineeships and fellowships offered nationally by the National Science Foundation, NASA, DOE, and other governmental agencies that traditionally support students in the department. For an extensive list of such opportunities, visit the Office of the Dean for Graduate Education website, http://odge.mit.edu/finances/fellowships.

Interdisciplinary Programs

Through its interdisciplinary programs, the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering brings together the science, technology, systems, and management skills necessary to deal with the important engineering problems of the future.

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Graduate Programs in Transportation

MIT provides a broad range of opportunities for transportation-related education. Courses and classes span the School of Engineering, the Sloan School of Management, and the School of Architecture and Planning, with many activities covering interdisciplinary topics that prepare students for future industry, government, or academic careers.

A variety of graduate degrees are available to students interested in transportation studies and research, including a Master of Science in Transportation and PhD in Transportation, described under Interdisciplinary Graduate Programs in Part 3, as well as a nine-month Master of Engineering Transportation program, described in the Master of Engineering program for the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering.

Leaders for Global Operations Program

The 24-month Leaders for Global Operations (LGO) program combines graduate education in engineering and management for those with two or more years of full-time work experience who aspire to leadership positions in manufacturing or operations companies. A required six-month internship comprising a research project at one of LGO's partner companies leads to a dual-degree thesis, culminating in two master's degrees—an MBA (or SM in management) and an SM from one of seven MIT engineering programs, some of which have optional or required LGO tracks. For more information, visit http://lgo.mit.edu/.

Joint Program with the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

The Joint Program with the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution is intended for students whose primary career objectives are in the field of oceanography or oceanographic engineering. The program is described under Interdisciplinary Graduate Programs in Part 3.

Inquiries

Detailed information about the academic policies and programs of the department may be obtained by writing to or visiting the Academic Programs Office, Room 1-290, 617-253-9723, cee-apo@mit.edu, http://cee.mit.edu/.

Research Laboratories and Activities

The Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering occupies two buildings on the MIT campus: Building 1 (the Pierce Laboratory) and Building 48 (the Ralph M. Parsons Laboratory for Environmental Science and Engineering). These buildings contain specialized research and teaching facilities. In addition, the department collaborates interdepartmentally with other laboratories described below.

Ralph M. Parsons Laboratory for Environmental Science and Engineering

Located on the east campus, the Ralph M. Parsons Laboratory for Environmental Science and Engineering is a four-story structure containing about 31,000 square feet of classrooms, teaching and research laboratories, machine shops, computer facilities, and offices. Approximately 19 faculty members, 56 graduate students, and 45 postdocs have offices on the premises. Facilities exist for hydrodynamic studies involving flow through vegetation, free surface flows, and flows in porous media. The latest in laser-Doppler instrumentation is available. Complete and modern laboratories, including seven labs recently renovated, facilitate research in inorganic chemistry, organic chemistry, molecular biology, genomics, microbial ecology, and biochemistry. Especially notable instrumentation includes several gas chromatographs, three atomic absorption spectrophotometers (two flame and one graphite furnace), alpha and gamma spectrometry counting systems, scintillation counters, several flow cytometers, a laser light scattering instrument, and walk in incubators and cold room, as well as several -80°C freezers.

One laboratory is a dedicated teaching facility for fluid mechanics, hydrology, aquatic chemistry, and biology. Equipment is available for instruction in a wide range of field sampling methods, biological and microbiological evaluations, and instrumental chemical analyses of natural waters. In addition to a recent acquisition of a two-channel auto analyzer, two state-of-the-art analytical instruments have been purchased for the student laboratory: an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer and a gas chromatographic mass spectrometer.

Pierce Laboratory

Located in one of MIT's original buildings, this civil and environmental engineering facility overlooks the Charles River and includes over 40,000 square feet of classrooms, teaching and research laboratories, and offices for approximately 173 graduate students, 32 faculty members and research staff, and 24 postdocs.

Research activities focus on two major areas: mechanics and transportation. Among the classrooms is the state-of-the-art Bechtel Lecture Hall. The facilities include a recently renovated undergraduate teaching/project laboratory and common room and a materials testing laboratory. The laboratory has a machine shop, electronics room, 3-D printer, and laser cutter, providing support technology to process, fabricate, and create prototype devices and specimens, test under various stress and environmental conditions, and investigate physical properties. The materials testing laboratory contains several automated universal test frames, a biaxial loading system, and an environmentally controlled nano-indentation system. The geotechnical laboratories combine a broad range of equipment, from conventional to state-of-the-art to specialty research devices. Capabilities and equipment include industrial radiography; centralized data acquisition; computer-automated consolidation triaxial cells; simple shear devices; and a hollow cylinder apparatus.

The Pierce Laboratory offers diverse and advanced computational facilities, including network servers and publicly available Windows workstations. The computing facilities feature various structural, project management, geotechnical, and materials analysis software such as SAP, STRUDL, PLAXIS, MATLAB, AUTOCAD, FORTRAN, Primavera, Crystal Ball, ADINA, GaBi, KeyCreator and ABAQUS, and more. Printers and scanners are also present in all clusters in the building.

Concrete Sustainability Hub

The mission of the Concrete Sustainability Hub (CSH) is to advance the technology transfer from concrete science into engineering practice, by translating the synergy of three fields of study into a powerful hub for concrete sustainability studies relevant to industry and decision makers. CSH fosters a close alliance among academia, industry, and government to facilitate the transfer of knowledge by aligning world-leading research with end-user needs.

More concrete is produced than any other synthetic material on Earth. In the foreseeable future there is no other material that can replace concrete to meet our societies' legitimate needs for housing, shelter, schools, infrastructure, etc. But concrete faces an uncertain future due to a non-negligible ecological footprint that amounts to 5–10 percent of worldwide CO2 production.

Emerging breakthroughs in concrete science and engineering hold the promise that concrete can be part of the solution of contributing to sustainable development that encompasses economic growth, and social progress while minimizing the ecological footprint. This requires a holistic approach in which progress in concrete science seamlessly feeds into innovative structural concrete engineering applications, ranging from concrete pavement solutions to wall systems, whose impact on sustainable development are evaluated with advanced environmental-econometric impact studies. This is the focus of CSH. With this in mind, an exceptional team of dedicated interdisciplinary faculty from three schools within MIT—Engineering, Architecture and Planning, and the Sloan School of Management—are participating. More information is available at http://web.mit.edu/cshub/, or contact CSHub@mit.edu.

Center for Environmental Sensing and Modeling

The Center for Environmental Sensing and Modeling is a collaborative research program within the Singapore-MIT Alliance for Research and Technology involving many faculty members from Civil and Environmental Engineering and other MIT departments, scholars, and universities. Researchers, primarily from MIT and universities in Singapore, are developing pervasive environmental sensor networks to collect data from many sources on parameters such as air and water quality. They plan to use this data to provide accurate, real-time monitoring, modeling and control of the environment from the microscale of a building to the macroscale of, for example, East Asia. More information about the center is available at http://smart.mit.edu/research/censam/censam.html.

Earth System Initiative

The Earth System Initiative (ESI) fosters exploration of the intimately interrelated physical, chemical, biological, and geological processes that shape our global ecosystem. By involving faculty, staff, and students across the spectrum of environmentally oriented disciplines, ESI brings the widest variety of scientific perspectives and methods to bear in understanding how the Earth system functions and how we can be better stewards of our planet. For more information, see the ESI website at http://web.mit.edu/esi/.

Center for Global Change Science

The Center for Global Change Science (CGCS) addresses fundamental questions about the environment and climate processes with a multidisciplinary approach. The center's goal is to improve the ability to accurately predict changes in the global environment. It seeks to better understand the natural mechanisms in ocean, atmosphere, and land systems that together control the Earth's climate, and to apply improved knowledge to problems of predicting climate changes. The center utilizes theory, observations, and numerical models to investigate climate phenomena, and focuses on large projects that require the cooperation of multiple investigators and disciplines. It provides opportunities for close cooperation in education and research between faculty, research scientist staff, and students in Civil and Environmental Engineering, the Department of Earth, Atmospheric and Planetary Sciences, the MIT Energy Initiative, and other departments. The major projects in CGCS are the Climate Modeling Initiative, the Advanced Global Atmospheric Gases Experiment, and the Joint Program on the Science and Policy of Global Change. More information is available under Interdisciplinary Research and Study in Part 3 or at http://cgcs.mit.edu.

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Faculty and Staff

Markus J. Buehler, PhD
Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering
Department Head

Faculty and Teaching Staff

Professors

Cynthia Barnhart, PhD
Ford Professor of Engineering
Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Engineering Systems
Director, Transportation@MIT
Associate Dean of Engineering

Moshe Emanuel Ben-Akiva, PhD
Edmund K. Turner Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering

Oral Buyukozturk, PhD
Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering

Sallie W. Chisholm, PhD
Lee and Geraldine Martin Professor of Environmental Studies
Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Biology
Associate Member, Broad Institute

Jerome Joseph Connor, Jr., ScD
Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering

Edward F. DeLong, PhD
Martin and Claire Goulder Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Biological Engineering

Richard Lawrence de Neufville, PhD
Professor of Engineering Systems and Civil and Environmental Engineering

Herbert Heinrich Einstein, ScD
Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering

Elfatih A. B. Eltahir, ScD
Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering

Dara Entekhabi, PhD
Bacardi and Stockholm Water Foundation Professor
Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences

Philip Michael T. Gschwend, PhD
Ford Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering

Charles F. Harvey, PhD
Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering

Harold Field Hemond, PhD
William E. Leonhard Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering

Patrick Jaillet, PhD
Dugald C. Jackson Professor of Electrical, Civil, and Environmental Engineering

Hamlin M. Jennings, PhD
Professor of the Practice of Civil and Environmental Engineering

Eduardo Kausel, PhD
Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering

Ole Secher Madsen, ScD
Donald and Martha Harleman Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering

Dennis B. McLaughlin, PhD
H. M. King Bhumipol Professor
Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering

Fred Moavenzadeh, PhD
James Mason Crafts Professor
Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Engineering Systems
Director, Technology and Policy Program
(On leave)

Heidi M. Nepf, PhD
Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering

John A. Ochsendorf, PhD
Professor of Building Technology and Civil and Environmental Engineering

Amedeo Rodolfo Odoni, PhD
Professor of Aeronautics and Astronautics and Civil and Environmental Engineering

Martin F. Polz, PhD
Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering

Yossi Sheffi, PhD
Elisha Gray II Professor Engineering Systems
Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering
Director, MIT Center for Transportation and Logistics

David Simchi-Levi, PhD
Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Engineering Systems
Codirector, Leaders for Global Operations Program

Joseph Martin Sussman, PhD
JR East Professor
Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Engineering Systems

Franz-Josef Ulm, PhD
George Macomber Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering

Daniele Veneziano, PhD
Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering

Andrew J. Whittle, PhD
Edmund K. Turner Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering

John Williams, PhD
Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Engineering Systems

Nigel Henry Moir Wilson, PhD
Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering

Associate Professors

Colette L. Heald, PhD
Associate Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering

Ruben Juanes, PhD
Atlantic Richfield Career Development Associate Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering

Jesse H. Kroll, PhD
Associate Professor of Civil, Environmental, and Chemical Engineering

Roman Stocker, PhD
Associate Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering

Assistant Professors

Saurabh Amin, PhD
Assistant Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering

Marta C. Gonzalez, PhD
Gilbert Winslow Career Development Assistant Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Engineering Systems

Carolina Osorio, PhD
Assistant Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering

Pedro M. Reis, PhD
Assistant Professor of Civil, Environmental, and Mechanical Engineering

Janelle R. Thompson, PhD
Henry L. and Grace Doherty Assistant Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering

Senior Lecturers

E. Eric Adams, PhD
John T. Germaine, PhD
George Kocur, PhD
Susan Murcott, MS
Frederick P. Salvucci, MS
Peter Shanahan, PhD
Richard Schulmann, PhD

Lecturers

Charles C. Caldart, JD
Christopher Cassa, PhD
Sheila Frankel, MA
V. Judson Harward, PhD
Lucy Jen, PhD
Paul Kassabian, MS
David Langseth, PhD
Mikel Murga, MS
Erik A. Nelson, MEng
Lance Neumann

Research Staff

Senior Research Engineer

E. Eric Adams, PhD

Senior Research Associate

John T. Germaine, PhD

Senior Research Scientist

Roland Pellenq, PhD

Principal Research Engineer

Earle Williams, PhD

Research Engineers

John Eppley, PhD
John MacFarlane, SM

Research Associates

John P. Attanucci, SM
Sheila L. Frankel, MA

Research Scientists

Asunción Martínez, PhD
Rafal Wocik, PhD

Professors Emeriti

Rafael Luis Bras, ScD
Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Emeritus

Peter Sturges Eagleson, ScD
Edmund K. Turner Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Emeritus

Lynn Walter Gelhar, PhD
Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Emeritus

Charles Cushing Ladd, ScD
Edmund K. Turner Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Emeritus

Thomas William Lambe, ScD
Edmund K. Turner Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Emeritus

Robert Daniel Logcher, ScD
Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Emeritus

David Hunter Marks, PhD
Morton and Claire Goulder Family Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Engineering Systems, Emeritus

Chiang Chung Mei, PhD
Ford Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Emeritus

Frank Edward Perkins, ScD
Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Emeritus

Daniel Roos, PhD
Professor of Engineering Systems and Civil and Environmental Engineering, Emeritus

 

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