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MIT Course Catalog 2014-2015

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Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

Electrical engineers and computer scientists are everywhere—in industry and research areas as diverse as computer and communication networks, electronic circuits and systems, lasers and photonics, semiconductor and solid-state devices, nanoelectronics, biomedical engineering, computational biology, artificial intelligence, robotics, design and manufacturing, control and optimization, computer algorithms, games and graphics, software engineering, computer architecture, cryptography and computer security, power and energy systems, financial analysis, and many more. The infrastructure and fabric of the information age, including technologies such as the internet and the web, search engines, cell phones, high-definition television, and magnetic resonance imaging, are largely the result of innovations in electrical engineering and computer science. The Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at MIT and its graduates have been at the forefront of a great many of these advances. Current work in the department holds promise of continuing this record of innovation and leadership, in both research and education, across the full spectrum of departmental activity.

The career paths and opportunities for EECS graduates cover a wide range and continue to grow: fundamental technologies, devices, and systems based on electrical engineering and computer science are pervasive and essential to improving the lives of people around the world and managing the environments they live in. The basis for the success of EECS graduates is a deep education in engineering principles, built on mathematical, computational, physical, and life sciences, and exercised with practical applications and project experiences in a breadth of areas. Our graduates have also demonstrated over the years that EECS provides a strong foundation for those whose work and careers develop in areas quite removed from their origins in engineering.

Undergraduate students in the department take two core subjects that introduce electrical engineering and computer science, and then systematically build up broad foundations and depth in selected intellectual theme areas that match their individual interests. Laboratory subjects, independent projects, and research provide engagement with principles and techniques of analysis, design, and experimentation in a variety of fields. The department also offers a range of programs that enable students to gain experience in industrial settings, ranging from collaborative industrial projects done on campus to term-long experiences at partner companies.

Graduate study in the department moves students toward mastery of areas of individual interest, through coursework and significant research, often defined in interdisciplinary areas that take advantage of the tremendous range of faculty expertise in the department and, more broadly, across MIT.

More information about the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science and its programs can be obtained from the department's website at http://www-eecs.mit.edu/.

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Professional and Preprofessional Programs

For MIT undergraduates, the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science offers the following programs leading to the Bachelor of Science and the Master of Engineering degrees:

  • The 6-1 program is for students specializing in electrical science and engineering and is accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of ABET, http://www.abet.org.
  • The 6-3 program is for those specializing in computer science and engineering, and is accredited by both the Engineering and Computing Accreditation Commissions of ABET.
  • The 6-2 program is for those whose interests cross this traditional boundary, and is accredited by both the Engineering and Computing Accreditation Commissions of ABET.
  • The 6-7 program, offered jointly by the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science and the Department of Biology (Course 7), is for students specializing in computer science and molecular biology. A detailed description of the list of requirements for this degree program may be found under Interdisciplinary Undergraduate Programs and Minors in Part 3.

Three MEng Programs are available:

  • The 6-A Master of Engineering Thesis Program with Industry combines the professional Master of Engineering academic program with periods of industrial practice at affiliated companies. An undergraduate wishing to pursue the Master of Engineering degree should initially register for one of the three bachelor's programs.
  • For interested and qualified students, the master’s program (6-P) leads directly, through a seamless five-year course of study, to the simultaneous awarding of the Master of Engineering and one of the three bachelor’s degrees. The 6-P program is intended to provide the depth of knowledge and the skills needed for advanced graduate study and for professional work, as well as the breadth and perspective essential for engineering leadership in an increasingly complex technological world.
  • The Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science jointly offers a Master of Engineering in Computer Science and Molecular Biology (6-7P) with the Department of Biology (Course 7). A detailed description of the list of requirements for this degree program may be found under Interdisciplinary Undergraduate Programs and Minors in Part3.

[see degree chart for Bachelor of Science]

The bachelor's programs in 6-1, 6-2, and 6-3 build on the General Institute Requirements in science and the humanities, and are structured to provide early, hands-on engagement with ideas, activities, and learning that allow students to experience the range and power of electrical engineering and computer science in an integrated way. The required introductory core subjects, 6.01 followed by 6.02, both involve substantial work in the laboratory, and each carries six units of Institute Lab credit. These are complemented by two mathematics subjects (6.041 or 6.042, also 18.03 or 18.06) and followed by a choice of three or four foundation courses (depending on which bachelor's program is selected) from a set of subjects that provide the basis for subsequent specialization. Students define their specialization by selecting three header subjects, a department laboratory subject, and two advanced undergraduate subjects from a quite extensive set of possibilities, and also carry out an advanced undergraduate project. Combining these with the four free electives permits students considerable latitude in shaping their program to match diverse interests, while ensuring depth and mastery in a few selected areas.

[see degree chart for Master of Engineering]

The master's program provides additional depth in a selected field of concentration, through coursework and a substantial thesis. The student selects (with departmental review and approval) 42 units of advanced graduate (H-level) subjects; these subjects, considered along with the two advanced undergraduate subjects from the bachelor's program, must include at least 36 units in an area of concentration. A further 24 units of electives are chosen from a restricted departmental list of mathematics, science, and engineering subjects.

The Master of Engineering degree also requires completion of 24 units of thesis credit under 6.ThM. While a student may register for more than this number of thesis units, only 24 units count toward the degree requirement. Adjustments to the department requirements are made on an individual basis when it is clear that a student would be better served by a variation in the requirements because of a student’s strong prior background.

Recipients of a Master of Engineering degree normally receive a Bachelor of Science degree simultaneously. No thesis is explicitly required for the preprofessional Bachelor of Science degree. However, every program must include a major project experience at an advanced level, culminating in written and oral reports.

Programs leading to the professional five-year Master of Engineering degree or to the preprofessional four-year Bachelor of Science degrees can easily be arranged to be identical through the junior year. At the end of the junior year, students with strong academic records may apply to continue through the five-year master's program. A student in the Master of Engineering program must be registered as a graduate student for at least one regular (non-summer) term. To remain in the program and to receive the Master of Engineering degree, students will be expected to maintain strong academic records. Admission to the Master of Engineering program is open only to undergraduate students who have completed their junior year in the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at MIT. Students with other preparation seeking a master's level experience in EECS at MIT should see the Master of Science program described later in this section.

Students in the fifth year of study toward the Master of Engineering degree are commonly supported by a graduate teaching or research assistantship. In the 6-A Master of Engineering Thesis Program with Industry students are supported by paid company internships. Students supported by full-time research or teaching assistantships may register for no more than two regular classes totaling at most 27 units. They receive additional academic units for their participation in the teaching or research program. Support through an assistantship may extend the period required to complete the Master of Engineering program by an additional term or two. Support is granted competitively to graduate students and may not be available for all of those admitted to the Master of Engineering program. The MEng degree is normally completed by students taking a full load of regular subjects in two graduate terms.  Students receiving assistantships commonly require a third term and may petition to continue for a fourth graduate term.

Additional information about the department's professional and preprofessional programs may be obtained from the EECS Undergraduate Office, Room 38-476, 617-253-7329, ug@eecs.mit.edu.

6-A Master of Engineering Thesis Program with Industry

The 6-A Master of Engineering Thesis Program with Industry enables students to combine classroom studies with practical experience in industry through a series of supervised work assignments at one of the companies or laboratories participating in the program, culminating with a Master of Engineering thesis performed at a 6-A member company. Collectively, the participating companies provide a wide spectrum of assignments in the various fields of electrical engineering and computer science, as well as an exposure to the kinds of activities in which engineers are currently engaged. Since a continuing liaison between the companies and faculty of the department is maintained, students receive assignments of progressive responsibility and sophistication that are usually more professionally rewarding than typical summer jobs.

The 6-A program is primarily designed to work in conjunction with the department's five-year Master of Engineering degree program. Internship students generally complete three assignments with their cooperating company—usually two summers and one regular term. While on 6-A assignment, students receive pay from the participating company as well as academic credit for their work. During their graduate year, 6-A students generally receive a 6-A fellowship or a research or teaching assistantship to help pay for the graduate year.

The department conducts a fall recruitment during which juniors who wish to work toward an industry-based Master of Engineering thesis may apply for admission to the 6-A program. Acceptance of a student into the program cannot be guaranteed, as openings are limited. At the end of their junior year, most 6-A students can apply for admission to 6-PA, which is the 6-A version of the department's five-year 6-P Master of Engineering degree program. 6-PA students do their Master of Engineering thesis at their participating company's facilities. They can apply up to 24 units of work-assignment credit toward their Master of Engineering degree. The first 6-A assignment may be used for the advanced undergraduate project that is required for award of a bachelor's degree, by including a written report and obtaining approval by a faculty member.

At the conclusion of their program, 6-A students are not obliged to accept employment with the company, nor is the company obliged to offer such employment.

Additional information about the 6-A Master of Engineering Thesis Program with Industry is available at the 6-A Office, Room 38-409E, 617-253-4644, and on http://vi-a.mit.edu/.

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Doctoral and Predoctoral Programs

The programs of education offered by the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at the doctoral and predoctoral level have three aspects. First, a variety of classroom subjects in physics, mathematics, and fundamental fields of electrical engineering and computer science is provided to permit students to develop strong scientific backgrounds. Second, more specialized classroom and laboratory subjects and a wide variety of colloquia and seminars introduce the student to the problems of current interest in many fields of research, and to the techniques that may be useful in attacking them. Third, each student conducts research under the direct supervision of a member of the faculty and reports the results in a thesis.

Three advanced degree programs are offered in addition to the Master of Engineering program described above. A well-prepared student with a bachelor's degree in an appropriate field from some school other than MIT (or from another department at MIT) normally requires about one and one-half to two years to complete the formal studies and the required thesis research in the Master of Science degree program. (Students who have been undergraduates in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at MIT and who seek opportunities for further study must complete the Master of Engineering rather than the Master of Science degree program.) With an additional year of study and research beyond the master's level, a student in the doctoral or predoctoral program can complete the requirements for the degree of Electrical Engineer or Engineer in Computer Science. The doctoral program usually takes about four to five years beyond the master's level.

There are no fixed programs of study for these doctoral and predoctoral degrees. Each student plans a program in consultation with a faculty advisor. As the program moves toward thesis research, it usually centers in one of a number of areas, each characterized by an active research program. Areas of specialization in the department that have active research programs and related graduate subjects include communications, control, signal processing, and optimization; computer science; artificial intelligence, robotics, computer vision, and graphics; electronics, computers, systems, and networks; electromagnetics and electrodynamics; optics, photonics, and quantum electronics; energy conversion devices and systems; power engineering and power electronics; materials and devices; VLSI system design and technology; nanoelectronics; bioelectrical engineering; and computational biology.

In addition to graduate subjects in electrical engineering and computer science, many students find it profitable to study subjects in other departments such as Biology, Economics, Linguistics and Philosophy, Management, Mathematics, Physics, and Brain and Cognitive Sciences.

The informal seminar is an important mechanism for bringing together members of the various research groups. Numerous seminars meet every week. In these, graduate students, faculty, and visitors report their research in an atmosphere of free discussion and criticism. These open seminars are excellent places to learn about the various research activities in the department.

Research activities in electrical engineering and computer science are carried on by students and faculty in laboratories of extraordinary range and strength, including the Laboratory for Information and Decision Systems, Research Laboratory of Electronics, Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory, Center for Materials Science and Engineering, Laboratory for Energy and the Environment (see MIT Energy Initiative), Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, Lincoln Laboratory, Media Laboratory, Francis Bitter Magnet Laboratory, Operations Research Center, Plasma Science and Fusion Center, and the Microsystems Technology Laboratories. Descriptions of many of these laboratories may be found under Interdisciplinary Research and Study in Part 3.

Because the backgrounds of applicants to the department's doctoral and predoctoral programs are extremely varied, both as to field (electrical engineering, computer science, physics, mathematics, biomedical engineering, etc.) and as to level of previous degree (bachelor's or master's), no specific admissions requirements are listed. All applicants for any of these advanced programs will be evaluated in terms of their potential for successful completion of the department's doctoral program. Superior achievement in relevant technical fields is considered particularly important.

Master of Science in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

The general requirements for the degree of Master of Science are given in Graduate Education in Part 1. The department requires that the 66-unit program consist of at least four H-level subjects which must include a minimum of 42 H-level units. In addition, a 24-unit thesis is required beyond the 66 units. Students working full-time for the Master of Science degree may take as many as four classroom subjects per term. The subjects are wholly elective and are not restricted to those given by the department. The program of study must be well balanced, emphasizing one or more of the theoretical or experimental aspects of electrical engineering or computer science.

Electrical Engineer or Engineer in Computer Science

The general requirements for an engineer's degree are given under Graduate Education in Part 1. These degrees are open to those able students in the doctoral or predoctoral program who seek more extensive training and research experiences than are possible within the master's program. Admission to the engineer's program depends upon a superior academic record and outstanding progress on a thesis. The course of studies consists of at least 162 units, 90 of which must be graduate H-level, and the thesis requirements for a master's degree.

Doctor of Philosophy or Doctor of Science

The general requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy or Doctor of Science are given under Graduate Education in Part 1. Doctoral candidates are expected to participate fully in the educational program of the department and to perform thesis work that is a significant contribution to knowledge. As preparation, MIT students in the Master of Engineering in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science program will be expected to complete that program. Students who have received a bachelor's degree outside the department, but who have not completed a master's degree program, will normally be expected to complete the requirements for the Master of Science degree described earlier, including a thesis. Students who have completed a master's degree elsewhere without a significant research component will be required to register for and carry out a research accomplishment equivalent to a master's thesis before being allowed to proceed in the doctoral program.

Details of how students in the department fulfill the requirements for the doctoral program are spelled out in an internal memorandum. The department does not have a foreign language requirement, but does require an approved minor program.

Graduate students enrolled in the department may participate in the interdisciplinary centers described in Part 3 , such as the Center for Biomedical Engineering and the Operations Research Center.

Fellowships and Research and Teaching Assistantships

Studies toward an advanced degree can be supported by personal funds, by an award such as the National Science Foundation Fellowship (which the student brings to MIT), by a fellowship or traineeship awarded by MIT, or by a graduate assistantship. Assistantships require participation in research or teaching in the department or in one of the associated laboratories. Full-time assistants may register for no more than two scheduled classroom or laboratory subjects during the term, but may receive additional academic credit for their participation in the teaching or research program.

Inquiries

Additional information concerning graduate academic and research programs, admissions, financial aid, and assistantships may be obtained from the Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Graduate Office, Room 38-444, 617-253-4605, or http://www-eecs.mit.edu/.

Interdisciplinary Programs

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Computation for Design and Optimization

The Computation for Design and Optimization (CDO) program offers a master's degree to students interested in the analysis and application of computational approaches to designing and operating engineered systems. The curriculum is designed with a common core serving all engineering disciplines and an elective component focusing on specific applications. Current MIT graduate students may pursue a CDO master's degree in conjunction with a department-based master's or PhD program. For more information, see the full program description under Interdisciplinary Graduate Programs in Part 3, or visit http://computationalengineering.mit.edu/education/.

Joint Program with the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution/Course 6-W

The Joint Program with the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution is intended for students whose primary career objective is oceanographic engineering. Students divide their academic and research efforts between the campuses of MIT and WHOI. The program is described in more detail under Interdisciplinary Graduate Programs in Part 3.

Leaders for Global Operations Program

The 24-month Leaders for Global Operations (LGO) program combines graduate education in engineering and management for those with two or more years of full-time work experience who aspire to leadership positions in manufacturing or operations companies. A required six-month internship comprising a research project at one of LGO's partner companies leads to a dual-degree thesis, culminating in two master's degrees—an MBA (or SM in management) and an SM from one of seven MIT engineering programs, some of which have optional or required LGO tracks. For more information, visit http://lgo.mit.edu/.

Master of Science in Engineering and Management

The System Design and Management (SDM) program is a partnership among industry, government, and the university for educating technically grounded leaders of 21st-century enterprises. Jointly sponsored by the School of Engineering and the Sloan School of Management, it is MIT's first degree program to be offered with a distance learning option in addition to a full-time in-residence option. For more information, see the program description under Engineering Systems Division.

Technology and Policy

The Master of Science in Technology and Policy is an engineering research degree with a strong focus on the role of technology in policy analysis and formulation. The Technology and Policy Program (TPP) curriculum provides a solid grounding in technology and policy by combining advanced subjects in the student's chosen technical field with courses in economics, politics, and law. Many students combine TPP's curriculum with complementary subjects to obtain dual degrees in TPP and either a specialized branch of engineering or an applied social science such as political science or urban studies and planning. For additional information, see the program description under Engineering Systems Division or visit http://web.mit.edu/tpp/.

 

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Faculty and Staff

Faculty and Teaching Staff

Anantha P. Chandrakasan, PhD
Joseph F. and Nancy P. Keithley Professor of Electrical Engineering
Department Head

William T. Freeman, PhD
Professor of Computer Science and Engineering
Associate Department Head

David J. Perreault, PhD
Professor in Power Engineering
Associate Department Head

Hae-Seung Lee, PhD
Advanced Television and Signal Processing Professor of Electrical Engineering
Co-Education Officer

Robert C. Miller, PhD
Professor of Computer Science and Engineering
MacVicar Faculty Fellow
Co-Education Officer

Leslie A. Kolodziejski, PhD
Professor of Electrical Engineering
Graduate Officer

Albert Ronald Meyer, PhD
Hitachi America Professor of Computer Science and Engineering
Undergraduate Officer

Karl K. Berggren, PhD
Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
Associate Director, Microsystems Technology Laboratory
Instructional Laboratory Officer

Markus Zahn, ScD
Thomas and Gerd Perkins Professor of Electrical Engineering
Director, 6-A Internship Program

Professors

Harold Abelson, PhD
Class of 1922 Professor of Computer Science and Engineering and Media Arts and Sciences

Anant Agarwal, PhD
Professor of Computer Science and Engineering
Director, Open Learning Enterprise at MIT

Akintunde I. Akinwande, PhD
Professor of Electrical Engineering

Saman P. Amarasinghe, PhD
Professor of Computer Science and Engineering

Dimitri A. Antoniadis, PhD
Ray and Maria Stata Professor of Electrical Engineering

Arvind, PhD
Charles W. and Jennifer C. Johnson Professor of Computer Science and Engineering

Arthur B. Baggeroer, ScD
Professor of Mechanical, Ocean, and Electrical Engineering

Hari Balakrishnan, PhD
Fujitsu Professor of Computer Science and Engineering

Marc A. Baldo, PhD
Professor of Electrical Engineering
Associate Director, Research Laboratory of Electronics

Regina A. Barzilay, PhD
Professor of Computer Science and Engineering

Bonnie A. Berger, PhD
Professor of Applied Mathematics and Computer Science
Associate Member, Broad Institute

Timothy Berners-Lee
3COM Founders Professor of Engineering

Abraham Bers, ScD
Professor of Electrical Engineering

Dimitri P. Bertsekas, PhD
McAfee Professor of Electrical Engineering

Robert Cregar Berwick, PhD
Professor of Computer Science and Engineering and Computational Linguistics

Sangeeta Bhatia, MD, PhD
John and Dorothy Wilson Professor of Electrical Engineering and Health Sciences and Technology
Howard Hughes Medical Investigator
Senior Associate Member, Broad Institute

Duane S. Boning, PhD
Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
Director, MIT Masdar Program

Louis Benjamin Daniel Braida, PhD
Henry Ellis Warren Professor of Electrical Engineering and Health Sciences and Technology

Rodney Allen Brooks, PhD
Professor of Computer Science and Engineering

Vladimir Bulovic, PhD
Fariborz Maseeh (1990) Professor of Emerging Technology and Electrical Engineering
MacVicar Faculty Fellow
Associate Dean for Innovation, School of Engineering

Vincent W. S. Chan, PhD
Joan and Irwin M. Jacobs Professor of Electrical Engineering

Isaac L. Chuang, PhD
Professor of Electrical Engineering and Physics

Munther A. Dahleh, PhD
Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
Acting Director, Engineering Systems Division

Randall Davis, PhD
Professor of Computer Science and Engineering
Associate Director, Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory

Jesús A. del Alamo, PhD
Donner Professor of Electrical Engineering
Director, Microsystems Technology Laboratories

Erik D. Demaine, PhD
Professor of Computer Science and Engineering

Srinivas Devadas, PhD
Edwin S. Webster Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

Mildred Spiewak Dresselhaus, PhD
Professor of Electrical Engineering and Physics
Institute Professor

Frederic P. Durand, PhD
Professor of Computer Science and Engineering

Joel S. Emer, PhD
Professor of the Practice

Yoel Fink, PhD
Professor of Materials Science and Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
MacVicar Faculty Fellow
Director, Research Laboratory of Electronics

Dennis M. Freeman, PhD
Professor of Electrical Engineering
MacVicar Faculty Fellow
Dean for Undergraduate Education

Clifton G. Fonstad, Jr., PhD
Professor of Electrical Engineering

James G. Fujimoto, PhD
Elihu Thomson Professor of Electrical Engineering

Robert Gray Gallager, ScD
Professor of Electrical Engineering

David K. Gifford, PhD
Professor of Computer Science and Engineering
Associate Member, Broad Institute

Shafrira Goldwasser, PhD
RSA Professor of Computer Science and Engineering
Associate Member, Broad Institute

Martha L. Gray, PhD
J. W. Kieckhefer Professor of Medical and Electrical Engineering

William Eric Leifur Grimson, PhD
Bernard M. Gordon Professor of Medical Engineering
Chancellor for Academic Advancement

Alan Jay Grodzinsky, PhD
Professor of Biological, Mechanical, and Electrical Engineering
Director, Center for Biomedical Engineering

John V. Guttag, PhD
Dugald C. Jackson Professor of Computer Science and Engineering

Jongyoon Han, PhD
Professor of Electrical Engineering and Biological Engineering

Frederick Clair Hennie III, ScD
Professor of Computer Science and Engineering

Berthold Klaus Paul Horn, PhD
Professor of Computer Science and Engineering

Judy L. Hoyt, PhD
Professor of Electrical Engineering
Associate Director, Microsystems Technology Laboratories

Qing Hu, PhD
Professor of Electrical Engineering

Piotr Indyk, PhD
Professor of Computer Science and Engineering

Tommi S. Jaakkola, PhD
Professor of Computer Science and Engineering

Daniel N. Jackson, PhD
Professor of Computer Science and Engineering
MacVicar Faculty Fellow

Patrick Jaillet, PhD
Dugald C. Jackson Professor of Electrical, Civil, and Environmental Engineering

M. Frans Kaashoek, PhD
Charles Piper Professor of Computer Science and Engineering
Associate Director, Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory

Leslie Pack Kaelbling, PhD
Panasonic Professor of Computer Science and Engineering
MacVicar Faculty Fellow

David R. Karger, PhD
Professor of Computer Science and Engineering

John Gabriel Kassakian, ScD
Professor of Electrical Engineering

Dina Katabi, PhD
Professor of Computer Science and Engineering

Manolis Kellis, PhD
Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
Associate Member, Broad Institute

James Logan Kirtley, Jr., PhD
Professor of Electrical Engineering

Jeffrey Hastings Lang, PhD
Vitesse Professor of Electrical Engineering

Steven B. Leeb, PhD
Professor of Electrical and Mechanical Engineering

Charles E. Leiserson, PhD
Professor of Computer Science and Engineering
MacVicar Faculty Fellow

Jae Soo Lim, PhD
Professor of Electrical Engineering

Barbara H. Liskov, PhD
Institute Professor

Andrew W. Lo, PhD
Charles E. and Susan T. Harris Professor of Finance
Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
Director, Laboratory for Financial Engineering

Tomás Lozano-Pérez, PhD
School of Engineering Professor in Teaching Excellence
MacVicar Faculty Fellow

Nancy Ann Lynch, PhD
NEC Professor of Software Science and Engineering

Samuel R. Madden, PhD
Professor of Computer Science and Engineering

Thomas L. Magnanti, PhD
Professor of Operations Research and Electrical Engineering
Institute Professor

Roger Greenwood Mark, MD, PhD
Distinguished Professor of Health Sciences and Technology and Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

Muriel Medard, PhD
Professor of Electrical Engineering

Alexandre Megretski, PhD
Professor of Electrical Engineering

Silvio Micali, PhD
Ford Professor of Computer Science and Engineering

Sanjoy Kumar Mitter, PhD
Professor of Electrical Engineering and Engineering Systems

Robert T. Morris, PhD
Professor of Computer Science and Engineering

Joel Moses, PhD
Professor of Computer Science and Engineering, and Engineering Systems
Institute Professor

Alan Victor Oppenheim, ScD
Ford Professor of Engineering

Terry Philip Orlando, PhD
Professor of Electrical Engineering

Asuman E. Ozdaglar, PhD
Professor of Electrical Engineering

Pablo Parrilo, PhD
Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
Associate Director, Laboratory of Information and Decision Systems

Li-Shiuan Peh, PhD
Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

Paul Livingstone Penfield, Jr., ScD
Professor of Electrical Engineering

Rajeev J. Ram, PhD
Professor of Electrical Engineering
MacVicar Faculty Fellow
Associate Director, Research Laboratory of Electronics

L. Rafael Reif, PhD
Professor of Electrical Engineering
MIT President

Martin C. Rinard, PhD
Professor of Computer Science and Engineering

Ronald Linn Rivest, PhD
Professor of Computer Science and Engineering

Ronitt Rubinfeld, PhD
Professor of Computer Science and Engineering

Daniela L. Rus, PhD
Professor of Computer Science and Engineering
Director, Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory

Joel E. Schindall, PhD
Bernard M. Gordon Professor of the Practice
Associate Director, Research Laboratory of Electronics

Martin A. Schmidt, PhD
Professor of Electrical Engineering
Provost

Jeffrey Howard Shapiro, PhD
J. A. Stratton Professor of Electrical Engineering

Nir N. Shavit, PhD
Professor of Computer Science and Engineering

Henry I. Smith, PhD
Professor of Electrical Engineering

Charles G. Sodini, PhD
Clarence Joseph LeBel Professor of Electrical Engineering

Collin M. Stultz, MD, PhD
Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, and Health Sciences and Technology

Gerald Jay Sussman, PhD
Panasonic Professor of Electrical Engineering

Peter Szolovits, PhD
Professor of Computer Science and Engineering and Health Sciences and Technology

Bruce Tidor, PhD
Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, and Biological Engineering
Associate Department Head, Biological Engineering

John N. Tsitsiklis, PhD
Clarence Joseph LeBel Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
Associate Director, Laboratory for Information and Decision Systems

George C. Verghese, PhD
Henry Ellis Warren Professor of Electrical Engineering
MacVicar Faculty Fellow

Joel Voldman, PhD
Professor of Electrical Engineering

Stephen Ashley Ward, PhD
Professor of Computer Science and Engineering

Cardinal Warde, PhD
Professor of Electrical Engineering

Ron Weiss, PhD
Professor of Biological Engineering and Computer Science
Director, Center for Integrative Sythetic Biology

Jacob K. White, PhD
Cecil H. Green Professor of Electrical Engineering

Alan Steven Willsky, PhD
Edwin S. Webster Professor of Electrical Engineering

Patrick Henry Winston, PhD
Ford Professor of Engineering
MacVicar Faculty Fellow

Gregory W. Wornell, PhD
Sumitomo Electric Industries Professor of Electrical Engineering

John L. Wyatt, Jr., PhD
Professor of Electrical Engineering

Lizhong Zheng, PhD
Professor of Electrical Engineering

Victor W. Zue, ScD
Delta Electronics Research Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

Associate Professors

Scott Aaronson, PhD
Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

Elfar Adalsteinsson, PhD
Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science and Health Sciences and Technology

Luca Daniel, PhD
Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering

Konstantinos Daskalakis, PhD
X-Consortium Associate Professor of Computer Science and Engineering

Polina Golland, PhD
Associate Professor of Computer Science and Engineering

Peter L. Hagelstein, PhD
Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering

Jing Kong, PhD
Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering

Timothy K. Lu, MD, PhD
Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, and Biological Engineering
Associate Member, Broad Institute

Wojciech Matusik, PhD
Esther and Harold E. Edgerton Career Development Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

Tomás Palacios, PhD
Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering

Rahul Sarpeshkar, PhD
Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering

Devavrat Shah, PhD
Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

Armando Solar-Lezama, PhD
Associate Professor of Computer Science and Engineering

Russell L. Tedrake, PhD
Associate Professor of Computer Science and Engineering

Antonio Torralba, PhD
Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

Michael R. Watts, PhD
KDD Career Development Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

Dana Weinstein, PhD
Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering

Mehmet Fatih Yanik, PhD
Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering and Biological Engineering
Associate Member, Broad Institute

Nikolai Zeldovic, PhD
Associate Professor of Computer Science and Engineering

Assistant Professors

Adam Chlipala, PhD
Douglas T. Ross Career Development Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

Dirk R. Englund, PhD
Jamieson Career Development Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

Thomas Heldt, PhD
Hermann L. F. von Helmholtz Career Development Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

Hadar Dana Moshkovitz, PhD
ITT Career Development Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

Yury Polyanskiy, PhD
Robert J. Shillman Career Development Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

Daniel Sánchez Martín, PhD
TIBCO Career Development Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

Vivienne Sze, PhD
Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

Vinod Vaikuntanathan, PhD
Assistant Professor of Computer Science and Engineering

Matei A. Zaharia, PhD
Assistant Professor of Computer Science and Engineering

Visiting Professor

Sanjoy Mahajan, PhD
Visiting Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

Adjunct Professors

G. David Forney, PhD
Adjunct Professor of Electrical Engineering

Butler W. Lampson, PhD
Adjunct Professor of Computer Science and Engineering

Michael Stonebraker, PhD
Adjunct Professor of Computer Science and Engineering

Madhu Sudan, PhD
Adjunct Professor of Computer Science and Engineering

Senior Lecturers

Tony Eng, PhD

Christopher J. Terman, PhD
Codirector, Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory

Technical Instructors

Gavin M. Darcey, MEng
Gim Hom, EE
David L. Lewis
Lourenço R. Pires, BS
Scott J. Poesse, AS

Research Staff

Senior Research Scientists

David D. Clark, PhD
Thomas Frederic Knight, Jr., PhD

Professors Emeriti

Michael Athans, PhD
Professor of Electrical Engineering, Emeritus

James Donald Bruce, ScD
Professor of Electrical Engineering, Emeritus

Fernando José Corbató, PhD
Professor of Computer Science and Engineering, Emeritus

Jack Bonnell Dennis, ScD
Professor of Computer Science and Engineering, Emeritus

Murray Eden, PhD
Professor of Electrical Engineering, Emeritus

David Jacob Epstein, ScD
Professor of Electrical Engineering, Emeritus

Shaoul Ezekiel, ScD
Professor of Aeronautics and Astronautics and Electrical Engineering, Emeritus

Robert Mario Fano, ScD
Ford Professor of Engineering, Emeritus

Lawrence Samuel Frishkopf, PhD
Professor of Electrical and Bioengineering, Emeritus

Harry Constantine Gatos, PhD
Professor of Molecular Engineering and Electronic Materials, Emeritus

Paul Edward Gray, ScD
Professor of Electrical Engineering, Emeritus
MIT President, Emeritus

Carl Eddie Hewitt, PhD
Associate Professor of Computer Science and Engineering, Emeritus

Erich Peter Ippen, PhD
Elihu Thomson Professor of Electrical Engineering and Physics, Emeritus

Robert Spayde Kennedy, ScD
Professor of Electrical Engineering, Emeritus

Francis Fan Lee, PhD
Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Emeritus

Alan Louis McWhorter, ScD
Professor of Electrical Engineering, Emeritus

Marvin Lee Minsky, PhD
Professor of Media Arts and Sciences and Computer Science and Engineering, Emeritus

Frederic Richard Morgenthaler, PhD
Professor of Electrical Engineering, Emeritus

Walter E. Morrow, Jr., MS
Professor of Electrical Engineering, Emeritus

Ronald Richard Parker, PhD
Professor of Electrical Engineering and Nuclear Science and Engineering, Emeritus

William Tower Peake, ScD
Professor of Electrical and Bioengineering, Emeritus

George Woodman Pratt, Jr., PhD
Professor of Electrical Engineering, Emeritus

Jack Philip Ruina, DEE
Professor of Electrical Engineering, Emeritus

Jerome H. Saltzer, ScD
Professor of Computer Science and Engineering, Emeritus

Herbert H. Sawin, PhD
Professor of Chemical Engineering and Electrical Engineering, Emeritus

Campbell Leach Searle, SM
Professor of Electrical Engineering, Emeritus

Stephen David Senturia, PhD
Professor of Electrical Engineering, Emeritus

William McConway Siebert, ScD
Ford Professor of Engineering, Emeritus

Richard Douglas Thornton, ScD
Professor of Electrical Engineering, Emeritus

Thomas Fischer Weiss, PhD
Professor of Electrical and Bioengineering, Emeritus

Gerald Loomis Wilson, ScD
Vannevar Bush Professor of Electrical and Mechanical Engineering, Emeritus

 

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