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MIT Course Catalog 2014-2015

Home > Schools & Courses > Engineering > Engineering Systems Division

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Engineering Systems Division

The Engineering Systems Division (ESD) tackles complex, large-scale problems utilizing faculty from most academic departments in the School of Engineering, as well as faculty from all five MIT schools. The mission of ESD is to solve previously intractable engineering systems problems by integrating approaches based on engineering, management, and social sciences, using new framing and modeling methodologies. MIT established the division in 1998 with the charter to develop academic and research programs that educate future leaders in our technological age, serve as a model to broaden engineering education, and expand the scope and practice of engineering. To accomplish these goals, ESD actively develops innovative relationships with industry and government through collaborative global research projects and long-distance educational programs. ESD focuses primarily on the following domains: extended enterprises, critical infrastructures, energy and sustainability, and health care delivery.

Designing engineering systems is increasingly difficult as the systems increase in size, scope, and complexity. The rate of change is increasing, often due to forces of globalization, new technological capabilities, rising consumer expectations, and increasing social awareness. Purely technical approaches to analysis and design of these systems often lead to failure, as a more comprehensive approach is required. Consequently, knowledgeable development of engineering systems calls for new frameworks of analysis and design that are broader than those of the traditional single-discipline paradigms of individual engineering departments. The effective design of engineering systems requires an integrative approach in which engineering systems professionals view the technological system as part of a larger whole. While the ESD approach is broad, it must also retain the depth associated with the traditional single-discipline approach. ESD is founded on the recognition that new approaches, frameworks, and theories—both broad and deep—must be developed to analyze and design complex systems.

The Engineering Systems Division encompasses five master's programs: Technology and Policy (TPP), Supply Chain Management (SCM), Leaders for Global Operations (LGO), System Design and Management (SDM), and a Master of Science in Engineering Systems. The core educational and research activity of ESD is the doctoral program in engineering systems, which prepares students for careers in academia, industry, and government.

ESD initiates research focused on important national and international issues that have science and technology components. These build upon the existing research programs in the Center for Transportation and Logistics; the Center for Engineering Systems Fundamentals; the Sociotechnical Systems Research Center; and the MIT Portugal Program.

ESD's educational and research programs are deeply involved with industry, government, and engineering practice in general. Units within ESD have many, often novel, relationships with industry. Some examples include the Center for Transportation and Logistics' Supply Chain Exchange, Integrated Supply Chain Managment Program, and AgeLab, as well as the corporate partnerships of the Leaders for Global Operations and System Design and Management programs.

Application forms for all programs can be accessed from http://web.mit.edu/admissions/graduate/. Applicants whose first language is not English must offer evidence of written and oral proficiency in English by registering at http://www.ielts.org/ for the International English Language Testing System (IELTS) exam, academic format, and achieving a score of 7.5 or better. Information about the Graduate Record Examinations (GRE) and Graduate Management Admissions Test (GMAT) is available at gre-info@ets.org and gmat@ets.org. Applicants should refer to the details of each program concerning specific requirements for admission. Links to all of the programs can be found at http://esd.mit.edu/.

For details, please refer to ESD's Academic Office (esdgrad@mit.edu) and to the MIT Sloan School of Management for programs offering joint degrees.

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Master's Programs

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Master of Science in Technology and Policy

The Technology and Policy Program (TPP) educates students seeking leadership roles in the constructive development and use of technology—an area that is not well served by the traditional education of technical or social science specialists. TPP focuses on meeting the need for engineering leaders who are capable of dealing effectively with core technical issues in their full economic, political, and administrative contexts.

TPP educates "leaders who are engineers and scientists"—persons who have strong technical foundations as well as the skills and ability to deal with important strategic issues concerning the intelligent and effective development of technology.

The Master of Science in Technology and Policy is an engineering research degree with a focus on the increasingly central role of technology in the framing, formulation, and resolution of policy problems. Many students combine TPP's curriculum with complementary subjects to obtain dual degrees in TPP and either a specialized branch of engineering or an applied social science such as political science or urban studies and planning.

TPP's coursework provides a solid grounding in technology and policy by combining advanced subjects in the student's chosen technical field with courses in economics, politics, and law. All students must complete a satisfactory research thesis that has a substantial technology and policy component. In order to prepare students for effective professional practice, TPP stresses leadership and communication. It also encourages students to participate in TPP's summer internship program, which places students in government and industry in the US and around the world.

The TPP curriculum consists of three blocks of subjects and a research thesis. The first block is a required integrative subject in technology and policy and a set of program seminars focusing on leadership and presentation skills. The second block focuses on training in formal frameworks for policy development and consists of restricted electives in microeconomics, political economy, and legal processes. The third block comprises a minimum of three coherent electives that fulfill professional and research objectives.

Completion of the academic and research requirements of the TPP SM typically takes three or four terms.

The subjects required for the TPP degree include ESD.101 Research and Concepts in Technology and Policy, and the following subjects or their equivalents: ESD.864 Modeling and Assessment for Policy, 15.011 Economic Analysis for Business Decisions, ESD.103 Science, Technology, and Public Policy, and ESD.132 Law, Technology, and Public Policy. Students are strongly encouraged to take ESD.71 Engineering Systems Analysis for Design, particularly those considering doctoral studies in ESD.

The TPP curriculum normally begins in September; applications are due by December 15. All applicants should have a strong basis in engineering or science, and must take the GRE. Strong candidates for the program typically score in the top 10 percent of all three GRE areas: verbal, quantitative, and analytic writing. Participants in TPP should generally have two years of work experience and be able to demonstrate evidence of leadership and initiative in their professional or other activities.

Contact the TPP program office in Room E40-369, 617-253-7693, tpp@mit.edu, or visit http://web.mit.edu/tpp/ for additional information.

Supply Chain Management Program

The Supply Chain Management Program is designed to supply the global logistics industry with a new type of supply chain professional, who is highly trained in both analytical problem solving and change management leadership. This one-of-a-kind professional degree program offered through ESD's Center for Transportation & Logistics prepares graduates for logistics and supply chain management careers in manufacturing, distribution, retail, transportation, logistics, consulting, and software development organizations.

The MIT Supply Chain Management Program leads to a Master of Engineering in Logistics (MLOG), which is completed in nine months (September through May) on the MIT campus in Cambridge, MA. During that time, students take specialized classes taught by leading logistics and supply chain professionals in areas such as logistics systems, supply chain design, inventory planning, and transportation management. In addition, students are given the opportunity to work closely with corporate members of the Center for Transportation & Logistics on research projects and travel to our global logistics center in Spain—for a supply chain education that spans the globe.

The MIT Supply Chain Management Program requires 90 MIT credit units: eight required subjects and the completion of a thesis project. Students also take at least nine credit units of electives. Students who have already taken one of the required subjects at a graduate level elsewhere can petition to replace that subject with another elective.

The subjects required for the MLOG degree are: ESD.250 Analytical Methods for Supply Chain Management, ESD.260J Logistics Systems, ESD.261J Case Studies in Logistics and Supply Chain Management, ESD.262J Supply Chain Leadership, ESD.263J Logistics Thesis Seminar, ESD.264J Database, Internet, and Systems Integration Technologies, ESD.803 Know Thyself Leadership Workshop, ESD.S20 Graduate Technical Writing Workshop, 15.521 Management Accounting and Control, and 15.871 Introduction to System Dynamics.

The program is primarily for students with industry experience, but is open to anyone who can meet the entrance requirements. Applicants should have a background in college level calculus, economics, probability and statistics. All applicants for the MLOG degree must take the GRE General Test or GMAT. Applicants whose first language is not English must take the IELTS exam and achieve a score equal to or higher than 7.5.

The MIT Supply Chain Management Program curriculum begins in September, with a required Orientation period in mid-August. There are three admission rounds. The round 1 deadline is December 1; the round 2 deadline is January 15; and the round 3 deadline is April 15. Applications and requests for additional information should be directed to the MIT Supply Chain Management Program Admissions Office, Room E40-359, 617-324-6564, scm@mit.edu, or visit http://scm.mit.edu/admissions/.

System Design and Management Program

MIT's System Design and Management (SDM) program, offered jointly by the School of Engineering and the MIT Sloan School of Management, is a master's degree program for technical professionals who seek to build upon their backgrounds and experience in order to advance to positions of leadership in their profession.

The SDM program offers the degree of Master of Science in Engineering and Management. Students take subjects drawn from three areas: systems (systems engineering, architecture, and optimization), management, and a technical area of the student's choosing.

SDM provides both on-campus instruction for resident degree students and distance learning instruction for technical professionals who are continuing in their positions at remote locations while enrolled in the program. The 13-month full-time program that begins in August requires 11 courses, 3 electives, a thesis seminar, and a thesis. The distance learning program requires 24 months to complete, with an initial period on campus in the second half of August followed by five semesters of distance education classes; students spend one semester in residence at MIT, and the total course requirements, including thesis, are the same as for the full-time, 13-month program.

The required courses span a combination of engineering and management topics, with leadership and teamwork modules interwoven in the curriculum. Core subjects include ESD.34J System Architecture, ESD.33J Systems Engineering, and ESD.36J System and Project Management. The remainder of the required subjects are one quantitative methods course (typically ESD.721 Engineering Risk-Benefit Analysis), ESD.762 Systems Optimization, one product development course (typically ESD.40 Product Design and Development), 15.381 The Human Side of Technology, ESD.763 Operations and Supply Chain Management or another operations course, 15.969 User-centered Innovation in the Internet Age, 15.905 Technology Strategy for SDM, and 15.514 Financial and Managerial Accounting.

All required subjects are taught on campus and via distance education. Elective selection is driven by the student's career objectives in consultation with the SDM program executive director. Students take one engineering and one management elective, and one design or product development elective, in addition to selected courses to fill the leadership requirement.

The ideal applicant for the SDM program will have a master's degree in engineering or the equivalent and three or more years as a product development professional, including experience as a team leader. Students with a bachelor's degree and five years of professional experience, including leadership experience, are encouraged to apply.

The SDM program begins in August. Potential student fellows may apply via the web at http://sdm.mit.edu/admission/masters/apply.html. For additional information contact the SDM Program Office in Room E40-315, 617-253-1055, sdm@mit.edu, or visit http://sdm.mit.edu/.

 

Leaders for Global Operations

An active partnership among the School of Engineering, the Sloan School of Management, and partner companies, the MIT Leaders for Global Operations (LGO) program develops world-class leaders for manufacturing and operations. LGO focuses on theory and global practice from concept development through product delivery, including challenges faced on factory floors and in global supply chains. The 24-month dual-degree LGO program integrates engineering and management disciplines and emphasizes leadership, teamwork, management of change processes, and learning by doing. Corporate partners provide generous fellowships for all students.

The LGO program leads to two MIT master's degrees: an SM from ESD (or another participating engineering department) and an MBA or SM from the MIT Sloan School of Management. In addition to ESD, six engineering master's programs participate in LGO: Aeronautics and Astronautics, Biological Engineering, Chemical Engineering, Civil and Environmental Engineering, Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, and Mechanical Engineering.

A required six-month internship consisting of a research project at one of LGO's partner companies leads to a single dual-degree thesis, culminating in two master's degrees—an MBA (or SM in management) and an SM from one of seven MIT engineering programs. LGO students in ESD must choose one of three tracks: manufacturing systems and supply chains, systems engineering, or energy and environmental sustainability. For more information, visit http://lgo.mit.edu/ and see the engineering program description for Engineering Systems.

Master of Science in Engineering Systems

The SM in Engineering Systems is an engineering degree available to students with an undergraduate degree in engineering or science. The degree focuses on the design and implementation of socio-technical systems. The ESD SM can be a terminal degree that prepares the student for productive practice, or it can be obtained during the ESD PhD program. The ESD SM allows ESD faculty and students to work together on issues of mutual interest different from those covered by the other masters' programs that are part of ESD (i.e., the Technology and Policy, Supply Chain Management, and System Design and Management programs described elsewhere in this chapter). It can also serve as the engineering SM for students in the Leaders for Global Operations program.

For details on admission to the ESD SM, see the Frequently Asked Questions about Admissions at http://esd.mit.edu/academics/sm_admissions.html. Admissions decisions are made once a year. Applications are due December 15.

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Doctoral Program

ESD's doctoral students are leaders in the evolution of engineering systems approaches—committed to thinking imaginatively about ways to broaden engineering's scope to solve complex problems. In the course of their studies, students acquire broad knowledge of the field of engineering systems and deep knowledge of a domain and of a methodology. By the time a student defends his or her thesis, he or she has conducted original scholarship on complex technical systems, advancing either theory, policy, or practice.

As with the Engineering Systems Division as a whole, the research done by students in the doctoral program can be categorized into several broad areas, including energy and sustainability, extended enterprises, health care delivery, and critical infrastructures, among others. Students use approaches that examine the interface of humans and technology or that measure, model, and mitigate the effects of uncertainty. Students work to improve the design and implementation of large, complex systems. Students deploy network models to understand complexly related social, technical, and managerial entities.

To accommodate the diversity of domains and approaches, ESD doctoral programs are highly individualized. PhD students and their committees construct programs that “go deep” in the domains and methodologies a student's research requires. Breadth of knowledge about the field of engineering systems is also essential. Alongside domain and methodology requirements, all students must take ESD.83 Doctoral Seminar in Engineering Systems, ESD.86 Models, Data and Inference for Socio-Technical Systems, ESD.87 Social Science Concepts and Methods, and an applied engineering systems subject. For details on the program, see http://esd.mit.edu/academics/phd.html.

Admission to the ESD PhD program is based upon outstanding academic performance in engineering or applied science, GRE scores, demonstrated fluency in English, deep interest in engineering systems as a field of study, and letters of recommendation. Admissions decisions are made once a year. All applications for the cohort forming in September are due December 15. For additional information, please visit the Frequently Asked Questions about Admissions at http://esd.mit.edu/academics/phd_admissions.html.

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Research Centers

Center for Engineering Systems Fundamentals

The Center for Engineering Systems Fundamentals (CESF) was founded in September 2005 to conduct research on the fundamentals and cross-cutting issues in engineering systems.

CESF is engaged in several areas, among them developing seminars and other mechanisms to discuss engineering systems fundamentals; collaborating with faculty to bring in resources for CESF and shape its relationships with ESD's other research centers, including the Sociotechnical Systems Research Center and the Center for Transportation and Logistics; and sponsoring an engineering systems book series and a biannual international symposium on engineering systems fundamentals. CESF seeks to establish cross-cutting research projects on problems of national significance that require integration of the methods of engineering, management, and the social sciences. Through the interdisciplinary framing, formation, and solution of socio-technical systems problems, this process should lead to the creation of engineering systems fundamentals. Current major projects include analysis of low-probability, high-consequence events such as pandemic influenza and food supply contamination; K-12 and K-16 education systems innovations for students pursuing science, technology, engineering, or mathematics careers; and demand-side home energy management.

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Center for Transportation & Logistics

For more than 40 years, the MIT Center for Transportation & Logistics (MIT CTL) has been a world leader in supply chain management and transportation education and research. MIT CTL engages in three principal activities: research, outreach, and education.

Research

The center's world-renowned research programs directly involve over 75 faculty and research staff from a wide range of academic disciplines, as well as researchers in various affiliate organizations around the world. MIT CTL has three main research programs: Supply Chain Management and Logistics, Transportation, and the impact of aging on mobility, health, and wellness.

In the field of supply chain management and logistics, MIT CTL has made major knowledge contributions and helped numerous companies gain competitive advantage from its cutting-edge research. Research projects include:

  • AgeLab
  • Carbon Efficient Supply Chains
  • Demand Management
  • FreightLab
  • Healthcare Supply Chain
  • Humanitarian Logistics
  • Older Driver Safety
  • Scenario Planning
  • Strategy Alignment
  • Supply Chain 2020: The Future of the Supply Chain
  • Supply Chain Innovation in Emerging Markets
  • Supply Chain Security
  • Supply Chain Network Risk Management

MIT CTL research in the area of transportation spans all of its aspects and modes. Research projects include:

  • New England University Transportation Center
  • MIT Port Resilience Project

The AgeLab brings together a multidisciplinary team from across MIT and around the world to conduct research on health and wellness, transportation, and longevity planning to develop new ideas and technologies that improve the quality of life for older adults and the people who care for them.

Outreach

The gateway to the center's research is MIT CTL's Corporate Outreach Program. Through this multifaceted program, industry and MIT CTL collaborate to turn innovative research into market-winning commercial applications. The center currently has more than 45 corporate partners worldwide who participate in its events, interact with its researchers, and contribute to and help steer its research projects.

Education

In education, MIT is consistently ranked first among business programs in logistics and supply chain management. MIT CTL graduate degrees and executive-level programs are unsurpassed for quality and market relevance.

The MIT Supply Chain Management (SCM) program attracts business professionals from across the globe to participate in its intensive logistics and supply chain management program. The SCM program is described under Master's Programs earlier in this chapter.

An ESD doctoral program can be focused on logistics and supply chain management as well.

Through MIT CTL, MIT is the lead university in Federal Region I of the University Transportation Centers program administered by the US Department of Transportation. Through this program, full and partial fellowships are awarded to graduate students in transportation. Research and teaching assistantships also are available through this and other programs. Undergraduates also may participate in sponsored research through the Undergraduate Research Opportunities Program.

Students interested in studying supply chain management and logistics, or in learning more about the center and its educational programs, should write to Dr. Bruce Arntzen, MIT Center for Transportation & Logistics, Room E40-355, barntzen@mit.edu, or visit http://scm.mit.edu/.

Students interested in the Master of Science in Transportation program administered through the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering should contact the director of the Transportation Graduate Program. Several departments offer both master's and doctoral degrees that allow a focus on transportation, including Aeronautics and Astronautics, Civil and Environmental Engineering, the Engineering Systems Division, and Urban Studies and Planning.

Sociotechnical Systems Research Center

The Sociotechnical Systems Research Center is an interdisciplinary research center that focuses on the high-impact, complex, sociotechnical systems that shape our world.

SSRC brings together faculty, researchers, students, and staff from across MIT and around the world to study and seek solutions to complex systems challenges that span health, energy, the environment, international development, the global economy, mobility, productivity, and cybersecurity.

For further information on SSRC and its programs, see Interdisciplinary Research and Study in Part 3.

 

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Faculty and Staff

Faculty and Teaching Staff

Munther A. Dahleh, PhD
Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
Acting Director

Professors

Cynthia Barnhart, PhD
Ford Professor of Engineering
Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Engineering Systems
Director, Transportation@MIT
Chancellor

John Carroll, PhD
Morris A. Adelman Professor of Management
Professor of Work and Organizational Studies and Engineering Systems

Joel Philip Clark, ScD
Professor of Materials Systems and Engineering Systems

Edward F. Crawley, PhD
Ford Professor of Aeronautics and Astronautics and Engineering Systems
President, Skolkovo Institute of Science and Technology
(On leave)

Michael Cusumano, PhD
Sloan Management Review Distinguished Professor of Management, Technological Innovation, Entrepreneurship, and Strategic Management
Professor of Engineering Systems

Richard de Neufville, PhD
Professor of Engineering Systems

Olivier L. de Weck, PhD
Professor of Aeronautics and Astronautics and Engineering Systems
Codirector, Center for Complex Engineering Systems at King Abdulaziz City for Science and Technology and MIT

Thomas Waddy Eagar, ScD
Professor of Materials Engineering and Engineering Systems

Steven D. Eppinger, ScD
General Motors Leaders for Global Operations Professor of Management, Operations Management, Management Science and Innovation
Professor of Engineering Systems
Codirector, System Design and Management Program

John Fernandez, MArch
Professor of Architecture, Building Technology, and Engineering Systems
Director, Building Technology Program
Codirector, International Design Center, Singapore University of Technology and Design

Charles Fine, PhD
Chrysler Leaders for Global Operations Professor of Management
Professor of Operations Management and Engineering Systems
Codirector, International Motor Vehicle Program

Daniel D. Frey, PhD
Professor of Mechanical Engineering and Engineering Systems

David Geltner, PhD
Professor of Real Estate Finance and Engineering Systems
Director of Research, Center for Real Estate

Stephen C. Graves, PhD
Abraham J. Siegel Professor of Management, Operations Management and Leaders for Global Operations
Professor of Engineering Systems and Mechanical Engineering

R. John Hansman, PhD
T. Wilson Professor of Aeronautics and Astronautics and Engineering Systems
Head, Division of Humans and Automation
Director, International Center for Air Transportation

Daniel Hastings, PhD
Cecil and Ida Green Education Professor of Aeronautics and Astronautics and Engineering Systems
Director, Singapore-MIT Alliance for Research and Technology

Eric Klopfer, PhD
Professor of Education and Engineering Systems
Director, Scheller Teacher Education Program

Thomas A. Kochan, PhD
George Maverick Bunker Professor of Management
Professor of Work and Employment Research and Engineering Systems
Codirector, MIT Sloan Institute for Work and Employment Research

Paul A. Lagacé, PhD
Professor of Aeronautics and Astronautics and Engineering Systems

Richard Larson, PhD
Mitsui Professor of Engineering Systems
Director, Center for Engineering Systems Fundamentals

Nancy Leveson, PhD
Professor of Aeronautics and Astronautics and Engineering Systems

Seth Lloyd, PhD
Professor of Mechanical Engineering and Engineering Systems

Stuart Madnick, PhD
John Norris Maguire (1960) Professor of Information Technology and Engineering Systems
Codirector, PROFIT Program

Christopher Magee, PhD
Professor of the Practice of Engineering Systems
Codirector, Singapore–MIT International Design Center

David A. Mindell, PhD
Frances and David Dibner Professor of the History of Engineering and Manufacturing
Professor of Engineering Systems
Director, Laboratory for Automation, Robotics, and Society

Fred Moavenzadeh, PhD
James Mason Crafts Professor
Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Engineering Systems
Director, Technology and Development Program

Joel Moses, PhD
Professor of Computer Science and Engineering Systems
Institute Professor

Dava J. Newman, PhD
Professor of Aeronautics and Astronautics and Engineering Systems
Director, Technology and Policy Program
Director, MIT Portugal Program

Deborah Nightingale, PhD
Professor of the Practice of Aeronautics and Astronautics and Engineering Systems
Director, Sociotechnical Systems Research Center

Alex Pentland, PhD
Toshiba Professor of Media Arts and Sciences and Engineering Systems
Director, Media Lab Entrepreneurship Program
Director, Human Dynamics Laboratory

Warren P. Seering, PhD
Weber-Shaughness Professor of Mechanical Engineering and Engineering Systems
Codirector, System Design and Management Program

Yossi Sheffi, PhD
Elisha Gray II Professor of Engineering Systems
Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering
Director, MIT Center for Transportation and Logistics

David Simchi-Levi, PhD
Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Engineering Systems
Codirector, Leaders for Global Operations Program

Anthony Sinskey, ScD
Professor of Biology, Health Sciences and Technology, and Engineering Systems

John Sterman, PhD
Jay W. Forrester Professor of System Dynamics
Professor of Engineering Systems

Joseph Martin Sussman, PhD
JR East Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Engineering Systems

James Utterback, PhD
David J. McGrath, Jr. (1959) Professor of Management and Innovation, Technological Innovation, and Entrepreneurship
Professor of Engineering Systems

Eric von Hippel, PhD
T. Wilson (1953) Professor in Management
Professor of Management of Innovation and Engineering Systems

David R. Wallace, PhD
Professor of Mechanical Engineering and Engineering Systems
MacVicar Faculty Fellow
Codirector, MIT CADlab

Roy Welsch, PhD
Eastman Kodak Leaders for Global Operations Professor of Management
Professor of Statistics and Engineering Systems
Director, Center for Computational Research in Economics and Management Science

Sheila Widnall, ScD
Professor of Aeronautics and Astronautics and Engineering Systems
Institute Professor

John Williams, PhD
Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Engineering Systems
Director, Information Engineering, Auto-ID Laboratory

Associate Professors

Hamsa Balakrishnan, PhD
Associate Professor of Aeronautics and Astronautics and Engineering Systems

Kenneth Oye, PhD
Associate Professor of Political Science and Engineering Systems

Maria C. Yang, PhD
Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering and Engineering Systems

P. Christopher Zegras, PhD
Associate Professor of Urban Planning, Transportation, and Engineering Systems
Singapore Research Professor
Head, International Development Group

Assistant Professors

Marta C. González, PhD
Gilbert Winslow Career Development Assistant Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Engineering Systems

César Hidalgo, PhD
Asahi Broadcast Corporation Career Development Assistant Professor of Media Arts and Sciences and Engineering Systems

Noelle Eckley Selin, PhD
Esther and Harold E. Edgerton Career Development Assistant Professor of Engineering Systems and Atmospheric Chemistry

Jessika Trancik, PhD
Assistant Professor of Engineering Systems

Visiting Professor

José Ignacio Pérez Arriaga, PhD
Visiting Professor of Engineering Systems

Visiting Associate Professor

Mort Webster, PhD
Visiting Associate Professor of Engineering Systems

Senior Lecturers

Jonathan Byrnes, DBA
Senior Lecturer, Engineering Systems

Christopher Caplice, PhD
Senior Lecturer, Engineering Systems
Executive Director, Center for Transportation and Logistics

Joseph Coughlin, PhD
Senior Lecturer, Engineering Systems
Director, AgeLab

Frank R. Field III, PhD
Senior Lecturer, Engineering Systems
Senior Research Associate, Sociotechnical Systems Research Center
Senior Research Engineer, Materials Systems Laboratory
Director of Education, Technology and Policy Program

Patrick Hale
Senior Lecturer, Engineering Systems
Director, System Design and Management Fellows Program

Donna Rhodes, PhD
Senior Lecturer, Engineering Systems
Principal Research Scientist, Sociotechnical Systems Research Center

Donald B. Rosenfield, PhD
Senior Lecturer, Management and Engineering Systems
Director, Leaders for Global Operations Program

Shalom Saar, PhD
Senior Lecturer, Engineering Systems

Research Staff

Research Associates

Bruce Arntzen, PhD
Edgar Blanco, PhD
Lisa D'Ambrosio, PhD
Jarrod Goentzel, PhD

Senior Research Scientist

Stan N. Finkelstein, MD
Senior Research Scientist, Engineering Systems
Associate Professor of Medicine, Harvard Medical School

Principal Research Scientist

Randolph Kirchain, PhD

Professors Emeriti

Thomas J. Allen, PhD
Howard W. Johnson Professor of Management, Emeritus
Professor of Engineering Systems, Emeritus

George E. Apostolakis, PhD
Korea Electric Power Professor of Nuclear Science and Engineering, Emeritus
Professor of Engineering Systems, Emeritus

Donald Lessard, PhD
Epoch Foundation Professor of International Management, Emeritus
Professor Engineering Systems, Emeritus

David Hunter Marks, PhD
Morton and Claire Goulder Family Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Engineering Systems, Emeritus

Sanjoy Mitter, PhD
Professor of Electrical Engineering and Engineering Systems, Emeritus

Ernest Moniz, PhD
Cecil and Ida Green Professor of Physics and Engineering Systems, Emeritus

Daniel Roos, PhD
Japan Steel Industry Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Engineering Systems, Emeritus

 

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