z MIT Course Catalog: Department of Mechanical Engineering
Skip to content
MIT Course Catalog 2013-2014

Home > Degree Programs > Engineering > Mechanical Engineering

[an error occurred while processing this directive]

Department of Mechanical Engineering

Mechanical engineering is concerned with the responsible development of products, processes, and power, whether at the molecular scale or at the scale of large, complex systems. Mechanical engineering principles and skills are needed at some stage during the conception, design, development, and manufacture of every human-made object with moving parts. Many innovations crucial to our future will have their roots in the world of mass, motion, forces, and energy—the world of mechanical engineers.

Mechanical engineering is one of the broadest and most versatile of the engineering professions. This is reflected in the portfolio of current activities in the department, one that has widened rapidly in the past decade. Today, our faculty are involved in projects ranging from, for example, the use of nanoparticles to tailor the properties of polymers, to the use of nonlinear dynamics to control unsteady flow separation; from the design and fabrication of low-cost radio-frequency identification chips, to the development of efficient methods for robust design; from the development of unmanned underwater vehicles, to the creation of optimization methods that autonomously generate decision-making strategies; from the invention of cost-effective photovoltaic cells, to the prevention of material degradation in proton-exchange membrane fuel cells; from the use of acoustics to explore the ocean of one of Jupiter's moons, to the biomimetics of swimming fish; from the development of physiological models for the human liver, to the development of novel ways for detecting precancerous events; and from the use of nanoscale antennas for manipulating large molecules, to the fabrication of 3-D nanostructures out of 2-D substrates.

The department carries out its mission with a focus on the seven areas of excellence described below. Our education and research agendas are informed by these areas, and these are the areas in which we seek to impassion the best undergraduate and graduate students.

Area 1: Mechanics: Modeling, Experimentation, and Computation (MMEC). At the heart of mechanical engineering lies the ability to measure, describe, and model the physical world of materials and mechanisms. The MMEC area focuses on teaching the fundamental principles, essential skills, and scientific tools to be able to predict and understand thermo-mechanical phenomena and use such knowledge in rational engineering design. We provide students with the foundations in experimental, modeling, and computational skills needed to understand, exploit, and enhance the thermo-physical behavior of advanced engineering devices and systems, and to make lifelong creative contributions at the forefront of the mechanical sciences and beyond. Research in the MMEC area focuses on four key thrusts:

  • Computational mechanics
  • Fluid dynamics
  • Mechanics of solid materials
  • Nonlinear dynamics

The fundamental engineering principles embodied in these topics can be applied over a vast range of force, time, and length scales, and applications of interest in the MMEC area span the spectrum from the nano/micro world to the geophysical domain. A Course 2-A track is offered in this area.

Area 2: Design, Manufacturing, and Product Development. Design, manufacturing, and product development is the complete set of activities needed to bring new devices and technologies to the marketplace. These activities span the entire product life-cycle, from the identification of a market opportunity or need, through design, testing, manufacture and distribution, and end of useful life. Our work includes everything from understanding the voice of the customer to finding new ways of processing materials to improve product performance and tracking product flow through a distribution network. A central component of this area is the design and construction of novel equipment, either for consumer products or for industrial uses. This spans scales from meters to microns, and involves mechanical, electronic and electromechanical devices. Many MechE students apply design, manufacturing, and product development skills and techniques to extracurricular design work for organizations and student activities such as Design that Matters, Formula SAE, Satellite Engineering Team, and the Solar Electric Vehicle Team. Some projects are intended as flagship products for new companies and are entered in the MIT $100K Entrepreneurship Competition. A Course 2-A track in product development is offered along with a unique Master of Engineering degree in manufacturing.

Area 3: Controls, Instrumentation, and Robotics. The mission in this area is to promote research and education for automating, monitoring, and manipulating systems. The focus is on system-level behavior that emerges primarily from interactions and cannot be explained from individual component behavior alone. We seek to identify fundamental principles and methodologies that enable systems to exhibit intelligent, goal-oriented behavior, and develop innovative instruments to monitor, manipulate, and control systems. The core competencies in which we seek to excel are:

  • Methodologies for understanding system behavior through physical modeling, identification, and estimation
  • Technologies for sensors and sensor networks; actuators and energy transducers; and systems for monitoring, processing, and communicating information
  • Fundamental theories and methodologies for analyzing, synthesizing, and controlling systems; learning and adapting to unknown environments; and effectively achieving task goals

We seek to apply our core competencies to diverse areas of social, national, and global needs. These include health care, security, education, space and ocean exploration, and autonomous systems in air, land, and underwater. We also offer a Course 2-A track in this area.

Area 4: Energy Science and Engineering. Energy is one of the most significant challenges facing humanity and is a central focus of mechanical engineering's contribution to society. Our research focuses on efficient and environmentally friendly energy conversion and utilization from fossil and renewable resources. Programs in the department cover many of the disciplinary and technological aspects of energy, with applications to high performance combustion engines, batteries and fuel cells, thermoelectricity and photovoltaics, wind turbines, and efficient buildings. Work in very-low-temperature thermodynamics includes novel sub-Kelvin refrigeration. Efforts in high-temperature thermodynamics and its coupling with transport and chemistry include internal combustion engine analysis, design, and technology; control of combustion dynamics and emissions; thermoelectric energy conversion; low- and high-temperature fuel cells; and novel materials for rechargeable batteries. Work in heat and mass transport covers thermal control of electronics from manufacturing to end use; microscale and nanoscale transport phenomena; desalination and water purification; high heat flux engineering; and energy-efficient building technology. Work in renewable energy encompasses the design of offshore and floating wind turbines and tidal wave machines; and analysis and manufacturing of photovoltaic and thermophotovoltaic devices. Energy storage, hybrid systems, fuel synthesis, and integration of energy systems are active research areas in the department. We also offer a Course 2-A track in energy.

Area 5: Ocean Science and Engineering. The oceans cover over 70 percent of the planet's surface and constitute a critical element in our quality of life, including the climate and the resources and food that we obtain from the sea. This area's objectives are to support the undergraduate and graduate programs in ocean engineering, including the naval construction program, the MIT/Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution Joint Program in Applied Oceanography and the Course 2-OE degree in mechanical and ocean engineering. It also serves as the focus point of ocean-related research and education at MIT. Major current research activities include marine robotics and navigation of underwater vehicles and smart sensors for ocean mapping and exploration; biomimetics to extract new understanding for the development of novel ocean systems studying marine animals; the study of the mechanics and fluid mechanics of systems for ultradeep ocean gas and oil extraction; ocean wave and offshore wind energy extraction; the free surface hydrodynamics of ocean-going vehicles; the development of advanced naval and commercial ships and submersibles, including the all-electric ship; the mechanics and crashworthiness of ocean ships and structures; ocean transportation systems; ocean acoustics for communication, detection, and mapping in the ocean; and adaptive sampling and multidisciplinary forecasting of the ocean behavior. The design of complex ocean systems permeates all these areas and provides the cohesive link for our research and teaching activities.

Area 6: Bioengineering. Engineering analysis, design, and synthesis are needed to understand biological processes and to harness them successfully for human use. Mechanical forces and structures play an essential role in governing the function of cells, tissues, and organs. Our research emphasizes integration of molecular-to-systems–level approaches to probe the behavior of natural biological systems; and to design and build new systems. At the smallest scale, proteins, enzymes, and biological motors are being studied using instrumentation that combines optical tweezers, single-molecule fluorescence, and pulsed spectroscopy. Single molecules are manipulated within complex systems using nanoscale antennas, opening new avenues for therapy and diagnosis. Computational and experimental models are used to describe the networks of molecules in the cytoskeleton, and how they couple with the extracellular matrix to respond to external forces. Emphasis is also placed on creating new physiological models using the tools of nano- and microfabrication as well as creation of new biomaterials. Applications include understanding, diagnosing, and treating diseases ranging from atherosclerosis to osteoarthritis to liver failure; new tools for drug discovery and drug development; and tissue-engineered scaffolds and devices for in vivo regeneration of tissues and organs. Work also includes design and fabrication of new devices and tools for rehabilitation of stroke victims, and for robotic surgery. We offer many elective subjects as well as a bioengineering track in Course 2-A.

Area 7: Nano/Micro Science and Technology. The miniaturization of devices and systems of ever-increasing complexity has been a fascinating and productive engineering endeavor during the past few decades. Near and long term, this trend will be amplified as physical understanding of the nano world expands, and widespread commercial demand drives the application of manufacturing to micro- and nanosystems. Micro- and nanotechnology can have tremendous impact on a wide range of mechanical systems. Examples include microelectromechanical system (MEMS) devices and systems that are already deployed as automobile airbag sensors and for drug delivery; stronger and lighter nanostructured materials now used in automobiles; and nanostructured energy conversion devices that significantly improve the efficiency of macroscale energy systems. Research in this area cuts across mechanical engineering and other disciplines. Examples include sensors and actuators; fluidics, heat transfer, and energy conversion at the micro- and nanoscales; optical and biological micro- and nano-electromechanical systems (MEMS and NEMS); engineered 3-D nanomaterials; ultraprecision engineering; and the application of optics in measurement, sensing, and systems design. Our faculty members have developed and are developing new educational materials in micro and nano science and technology. Students interested in micro/nano technology are encouraged to explore the Course 2-A nanoengineering track.

In order to prepare the mechanical engineers of the future, the department has developed undergraduate and graduate educational programs of the depth and breadth necessary to address the diverse and rapidly changing technological challenges that society faces. Our educational programs combine the rigor of academic study with the excitement and creativity inherent to innovation and research.

back to top

Undergraduate Study

The Department of Mechanical Engineering offers three programs of undergraduate study. The first of these, the traditional program that leads to the bachelor's degree in mechanical engineering, is a more structured program that prepares students for a broad range of career choices in the field of mechanical engineering. The second program leads to a bachelor's degree in engineering and is intended for students whose career objectives require greater flexibility. It allows them to combine the essential elements of the traditional mechanical engineering program with study in another, complementary field. The third program, in mechanical and ocean engineering, is also a structured program for students interested in mechanical engineering as it applies to the engineering aspects of ocean science, exploration, and utilization, and of marine transportation.

All of the educational programs in the department prepare students for professional practice in an era of rapidly advancing technology. They combine a strong base in the engineering sciences (mechanics, materials, fluid and thermal sciences, systems and control) with project-based laboratory and design experiences. All strive to develop independence, creative talent, and leadership, as well as the capability for continuing professional growth.

Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering/Course 2
[see degree chart]

The program in mechanical engineering provides a broad intellectual foundation in the field of mechanical engineering. The program develops the relevant engineering fundamentals, includes various experiences in their application, and introduces the important methods and techniques of engineering practice.

The educational objectives of the program leading to the degree Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering are that: (1) in their careers, graduates will bring to bear a solid foundation in basic mathematical and scientific knowledge and a firm understanding of the fundamental principles and disciplines of mechanical engineering; (2) graduates will use proper engineering principles when they model, measure, analyze, and design mechanical and thermal components and systems; (3) graduates will have the professional skills necessary for formulating and executing design projects, for teamwork, and for effective communication; and (4) graduates will demonstrate the confidence, awareness of societal context, professional ethics, and motivation for lifelong learning that are necessary for them to be leaders in their chosen fields of endeavor.

Students are urged to contact the MechE Undergraduate Office as soon as they have decided to enter mechanical engineering so that a faculty advisor may be assigned. Students, together with their faculty advisors, plan a program that best utilizes the departmental electives and the 48 units of unrestricted electives available in the Course 2 degree program.

This curriculum is accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of ABET, http://www.abet.org/, as a mechanical engineering degree.

Bachelor of Science in Engineering as Recommended by the Department of Mechanical Engineering/Course 2-A
[see degree chart]

Course 2-A is designed for students whose academic and career goals demand greater breadth and flexibility than are allowed under the mechanical engineering program, Course 2. To a large extent, the 2-A program allows students an opportunity to tailor a curriculum to their own needs, starting from a solid mechanical engineering base. The program combines a rigorous grounding in core mechanical engineering topics with an individualized course of study focused on a second area that the student designs with the help and approval of the 2-A faculty advisor. The program leads to the degree Bachelor of Science in Engineering as Recommended by the Department of Mechanical Engineering.

This curriculum is accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of ABET, http://www.abet.org/, as an engineering degree.

The educational objectives of the program leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Engineering as recommended by the Department of Mechanical Engineering are that: (1) in their careers, graduates will bring to bear a solid foundation in basic mathematical and scientific knowledge and a firm understanding of the basic principles and disciplines of mechanical engineering; (2) graduates will use proper engineering principles when they model, measure, analyze, and design engineering systems, processes, and components; (3) graduates will have the professional skills necessary for formulating and executing design projects, for teamwork, and for effective communication; (4) graduates will demonstrate the confidence, awareness of societal context, professional ethics, and motivation for lifelong learning that are necessary for them to be leaders in their chosen fields of endeavor; and (5) graduates will integrate mechanical engineering technical abilities and knowledge with those of another disciplinary field.

A significant part of the 2-A curriculum consists of electives chosen by the student to provide in-depth study of a field of the student's choosing. A wide variety of popular concentrations are possible in which well-selected academic subjects complement a foundation in mechanical engineering and general Institute requirements. Some examples of potential concentrations include robotics, engineering management, product development, biomedical engineering and pre-medicine, energy conversion engineering, sustainable development, architecture and building technology, and any of the seven departmental focus areas mentioned above. The MechE faculty have developed specific recommendations in some of these areas; details are available from the MechE Undergraduate Office and on the departmental website.

Concentrations are not limited to those listed above. Students are encouraged to design and propose technically oriented concentrations that reflect their own needs and those of society.

The student's overall program must contain a total of at least one and one-half years of engineering content (150 units) appropriate to the student's field of study. The required core and second-level subjects include approximately 78 units of engineering topics. The self-designed concentration must include at least 72 more units of engineering topics. While engineering topics are usually covered through engineering subjects, subjects outside the School of Engineering may provide material essential to the engineering program of some concentrations. For example, management subjects usually form an essential part of an engineering management concentration. In all cases, the relationship of concentration subjects to the particular theme of the concentration must be obvious.

To pursue the 2-A degree, students must submit the online 2-A enrollment form no later than Add Date of their second term in the program. The online enrollment form is available at https://meche.mit.edu/resources/2A/ (MIT certificate required).

Bachelor of Science in Mechanical and Ocean Engineering/Course 2-OE
[see degree chart]

This program is intended for students who are interested in combining a firm foundation in mechanical engineering with a specialization in ocean engineering. The program includes engineering aspects of the ocean sciences, ocean exploration, and utilization of the oceans for transportation, defense, and extracting resources. Theory, experiment, and computation of ocean systems and flows are covered in a number of subjects, complementing a rigorous mechanical engineering program; a hands-on capstone design class allows students to master the design of advanced marine systems, including autonomous underwater vehicles and smart sensors.

This curriculum is accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of ABET, http://www.abet.org/, in both mechanical engineering and ocean engineering.

The educational objectives of the program leading to the degree Bachelor of Science in Mechanical and Ocean Engineering are that: (1) in their careers, graduates will bring to bear a solid foundation in basic mathematical and scientific knowledge and a firm understanding of the fundamental principles and disciplines of both mechanical and ocean engineering; (2) graduates will use proper engineering principles when they model, measure, analyze, and design mechanical, thermal, and ocean components and systems; (3) graduates will have the professional skills necessary for formulating and executing design projects, for teamwork, and for effective communication; and (4) graduates will demonstrate the confidence, awareness of societal context, professional ethics, and motivation for lifelong learning that are necessary for them to be leaders in their chosen fields of endeavor.

Graduates have exciting opportunities in offshore industries, naval architecture, the oceanographic industry, the Navy, or government, or for further study in graduate school.

Undergraduate Practice Opportunities Program

The Undergraduate Practice Opportunities Program, an innovative internship program administered and sponsored by the School of Engineering, offers opportunities to sophomores in the School. Further information on the program may be obtained from the department in which the student is registered or from Susann Luperfoy, executive director, Room 12-193, 617-253-0055, upop@mit.edu, or from http://web.mit.edu/engineering/upop/.

Minor in Mechanical Engineering

Students pursuing a minor in the department must complete a total of six 12-unit subjects in the Mechanical Engineering Department program (including 18.03 as a prerequisite to departmental subjects). Subjects for the minor must constitute a coherent program approved by the department, and be drawn from the required subjects and departmental electives in the Course 2 or Course 2-OE degree programs. These subjects must include four of the MechE program's required core subjects.

Inquiries

Further information on undergraduate programs may be obtained from the MechE Undergraduate Office, Room 1-110, 617-253-2305, me-undergradoffice@mit.edu, and from the downloadable Guide to the Undergraduate Program in Mechanical Engineering (http://web.mit.edu/me-ugoffice/gamed.pdf).

back to top

Graduate Study

The Mechanical Engineering Department provides opportunities for graduate work leading to the following degrees: Master of Science in Mechanical Engineering, Master of Science in Ocean Engineering, Master of Science in Naval Architecture and Marine Engineering, Master of Science in Oceanographic Engineering, Master of Engineering in Manufacturing, degree of Mechanical Engineer, degree of Naval Engineer, and the Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) or Doctor of Science (ScD), which differ in name only.

The Master of Engineering in Manufacturing degree is a 12-month professional degree intended to prepare students for technical leadership in the manufacturing industries.

The Mechanical Engineer's and Naval Engineer's degrees offer preparation for a career in advanced engineering practice through a program of advanced coursework that goes well beyond the master's level. These degrees are not a stepping stone to the PhD.

The Doctor of Philosophy (or Science), the highest academic degree offered, is awarded upon the completion of a program of advanced study and significant original research, design, or development.

Entrance Requirements for Graduate Study

Applications to the mechanical engineering graduate program are accepted from persons who have completed, or will have completed by the time they arrive, a bachelor's degree if they are applying for a master's degree, or a master's degree if they are applying for a PhD. Most incoming students have a degree in mechanical engineering or ocean engineering, or some related branch of engineering. The department's admission criteria are not specific, however, and capable students with backgrounds in different branches of engineering or in science may gain entry. Nevertheless, to qualify for a graduate degree, the candidate is expected to have had at least an undergraduate-level exposure to the core subject areas in mechanical engineering (applied mechanics, dynamics, fluid mechanics, thermodynamics, materials, control systems, and design) and to be familiar with basic electrical circuits and electromagnetic field theory.

Applications for September entry are due on December 15 of the previous year (except for the Master of Engineering in Manufacturing, which has a January 15 deadline), and decisions are reported in March. International students applying from abroad may be admitted, but they will be allowed to register only if they have full financial support for the first year.

All applicants to the graduate program in mechanical engineering must submit the GRE test results. International students whose native language is not English are required to take either the International English Language Testing System (IELTS) exam and receive a minimum score of 7 or the TOEFL exam with a minimum acceptable score of 577 (PBT), 233 (CBT) or 90 (iBT).

Early Admission to Master's Degree Programs in Mechanical Engineering

At the end of the junior year, extraordinarily qualified students in the Department of Mechanical Engineering will be invited to apply for early admission to the graduate program. Students who are admitted will then be able to enroll in core graduate subjects during the senior year and to find a faculty advisor who is willing to start and supervise research for the master's thesis while the student is still in the senior year. With the consent of the faculty advisor, the student may also use a portion of the work conducted towards the master's thesis in the senior undergraduate year to satisfy the requirements of the bachelor's thesis.

Writing Ability Requirement

The Mechanical Engineering Department requires that all incoming graduate students demonstrate satisfactory English writing ability, or successfully complete appropriate training in writing. This requirement reflects the faculty's conviction that writing is an essential skill for all engineers. All incoming graduate students, native as well as international, must take the departmental writing ability test, which is administered online in August. Depending on the results, a student will either pass or be required to take a short course during the Independent Activities Period (January).

Master of Science in Mechanical Engineering

To qualify for the Master of Science in Mechanical Engineering, a student must complete at least 72 credits of coursework, not including thesis. Of these, at least 48 must be graduate H-level subjects (refer to the Guide to Graduate Study on the MechE website). The remainder of the 72 units may be for G-level subjects or advanced undergraduate subjects that are not requirements in the undergraduate mechanical engineering curriculum.

At least three of the H-level subjects must be taken in mechanical engineering sciences (refer to the Guide to Graduate Study on the MechE website). Students must take at least one graduate mathematics subject (12 units) offered by the MIT Mathematics Department. No waivers are allowed. For the Master of Science in Oceanographic Engineering see also the requirements listed in the Joint Program with Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution.

Finally, a thesis is required. The thesis is an original work of research, development, or design, performed under the supervision of a faculty or research staff member, and is a major part of any graduate program in the Mechanical Engineering Department. A master's student usually spends as much time on thesis work as on coursework. A master's degree usually takes about one and one-half to two years to complete.

Master of Science in Ocean Engineering/Master of Science in Naval Architecture and Marine Engineering/Master of Science in Oceanographic Engineering

The requirements for each of these three degrees are that the student takes 72 credit units of graduate subjects—48 of which must be H-level subjects—and complete a thesis.

At least three of the subjects must be chosen from a prescribed list of ocean engineering subjects (refer to the Guide to Graduate Study on the MechE website). Students must also take at least one graduate mathematics subject (12 units) offered by MIT's Mathematics Department. For the Master of Science in Oceanographic Engineering, see also the requirements listed under the Joint Program with Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution.

The required thesis is an original work of research, development, or design, conducted under the supervision of a faculty or senior research staff member. The thesis usually takes between one and two years to complete.

Master of Engineering in Manufacturing

The Master of Engineering in Manufacturing is a 12-month professional degree in mechanical engineering that is intended to prepare the student to assume a role of technical leadership in the manufacturing industries. The degree is aimed at practitioners who will use this knowledge to become leaders in existing, as well emerging, manufacturing companies. To qualify for this degree, a student must complete a highly integrated set of subjects and projects that cover the process, product, system, and business aspects of manufacturing, totaling 90 units, plus complete a group-based thesis project with a manufacturing industry. While centered in engineering and firmly grounded in the engineering sciences, this degree program considers the entire enterprise of manufacturing. Students will gain both a broad understanding of the many facets of manufacturing and a knowledge of manufacturing fundamentals from which to build new technologies and businesses. The admission process is identical to that of the Master of Science degree, with the exception that two additional essay questions are required. For more information, see the program description at http://web.mit.edu/meng-manufacturing/.

[an error occurred while processing this directive]

 

Leaders for Global Operations Program

The 24-month Leaders for Global Operations (LGO) program combines graduate education in engineering and management for those with two or more years of full-time work experience who aspire to leadership positions in manufacturing or operations companies. A required six-month internship comprising a research project at one of LGO's partner companies leads to a dual-degree thesis, culminating in two master's degrees—an MBA (or SM in management) and an SM from one of seven MIT engineering programs, some of which have optional or required LGO tracks. For more information, visit http://lgo.mit.edu/.

Mechanical Engineer's Degree

The Mechanical Engineer's degree provides an opportunity for further study beyond the master's level for those who wish to enter engineering practice rather than research. This degree emphasizes breadth of knowledge in mechanical engineering and its economic and social implications, and is quite distinct from the PhD, which emphasizes depth and originality of research.

The engineer's degree requires a broad program of advanced coursework in mechanical engineering totaling at least 162 credit units (typically about 14 subjects), including those taken during the master's degree program. The engineer's degree program is centered around the application of engineering principles to advanced engineering problems and includes a Mechanical Engineering examination and an applications-oriented thesis, which may be an extension of a suitable master's thesis. An engineer's degree typically requires at least one year of study beyond the master's degree.

Naval Engineer's Degree—Program in Naval Construction and Engineering

The Naval Construction and Engineering (NVE) program provides US Navy and US Coast Guard officers, foreign naval officers, and civilian students interested in ships and ship design a broad graduate-level education for a career as a naval engineer.

The program leads to the Naval Engineer's degree, which requires a higher level of professional competence and broader range of knowledge than is required for the degree of Master of Science in Naval Architecture and Marine Engineering or Ocean Engineering. Subjects in the areas of economics, industrial management, and public policy and law, and at least 12 units of comprehensive design are required, in addition to an in-depth curriculum that includes naval architecture, hydrodynamics, ship structures, materials science, and power and propulsion. The program is appropriate for naval officers and civilians who plan to participate in the design and construction of naval ships, as well as those interested in commercial ship design.

For students working toward a simultaneous Naval Engineer's degree and a master's degree, a single thesis is generally acceptable, provided it is appropriate to the specifications of both degrees, demonstrating an educational maturity expected of the Naval Engineer's degree.

Doctor of Philosophy and Doctor of Science

The highest academic degree is the Doctor of Science, or Doctor of Philosophy (the two differ only in name). This degree is awarded upon the completion of a program of advanced study, and the performance of significant original research, design, or development. Doctoral degrees are offered in all areas represented by the department's faculty.

Students become candidates for the doctorate by passing the doctoral qualifying examinations. The doctoral program includes a major program of advanced study in the student's principal area of interest, and a minor program of study in a different field. The MechE Graduate Office should be consulted about the deadline for passing the qualifying exam.

The principal component of the program is the thesis. The thesis is a major, original work that makes a significant research, development, or design contribution in its field. The thesis and the program of study are done under a faculty supervisor and a doctoral committee selected by the student and his or her supervisor, and perhaps other interested faculty members. The committee makes an annual examination of the candidate's progress and conducts a final examination based on the thesis. The doctoral program usually takes a minimum of two years of work beyond the master's degree.

Interdisciplinary Programs

Graduate students registered in the Department of Mechanical Engineering may elect to participate in interdisciplinary programs of study. Programs are available in computation for design and optimization, polymer science and technology, and technology and policy. See Interdisciplinary Graduate Programs in Part 3 for program descriptions.

Joint Program with the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

The Joint Program with the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (2W) is intended for students whose primary career objective is oceanographic engineering. Students divide their academic and research efforts between the campuses of MIT and WHOI. Joint Program students are assigned an MIT faculty member as academic advisor; however, thesis research may be supervised by MIT or WHOI faculty. While in residence at MIT, students follow a program similar to that of other students in the department. The program is described in more detail under Interdisciplinary Graduate Programs in Part 3.

Assistantships and Fellowships

The Department of Mechanical Engineering offers three types of financial assistance to graduate students: research assistantships, teaching assistantships, and fellowships.

The majority of students in the department are supported by research assistantships (RAs), which are appointments to work on particular research projects with particular faculty members. Faculty members procure research grants for various projects and hire graduate students to carry out the research. The research is almost invariably structured so that it becomes the student's thesis. An RA appointment provides a full-tuition scholarship (i.e., covers all tuition) plus a salary that is adequate for a single person. The financial details are outlined in a separate handout available from the MechE Graduate Office. An RA may register for a maximum of 24 units (about two subjects) of classroom subjects per regular term and 12 units in the summer term, and must do at least the equivalent of 24 units of thesis (i.e., research on the project) per term. (Please note that Master of Engineering in Manufacturing students are not eligible for RA or TA positions since their subject credits exceed these limits.)

Teaching assistants (TAs) are appointed to work on specific subjects of instruction. As the name implies, they usually assist a faculty member in teaching, often grading homework problems and tutoring students. In the Mechanical Engineering Department, TAs are very seldom used for regular full-time classroom teaching. TAs are limited to 24 units of credit per regular term, including both classroom subjects and thesis. The TA appointment does not usually extend through the summer.

A fellowship provides the student with a direct grant, and leaves the student open to select his or her own research project and supervisor. A limited number of awards and scholarships are available to graduate students directly through the department. A number of students are also supported by fellowships from outside agencies, such as the National Science Foundation, Office of Naval Research, and Department of Defense. Scholarships are awarded each year by the Society of Naval Architects and Marine Engineers. These awards are normally granted to applicants whose interest is focused on naval architecture and marine engineering or on ocean engineering. Applications are made directly to the granting agency, and inquiries for the fall term should be made in the preceding fall term.

Prospective students are invited to communicate with the department regarding any of these educational and financial opportunities.

Experience has shown that the optimum graduate program consists of about equal measures of coursework and research, consistent with an RA appointment. The main advantage of a fellowship is a greater freedom in choosing a research project and supervisor. A teaching assistantship gives the student teaching experience and can also be extremely valuable for reviewing basic subject material—for example, in preparation for the doctoral qualifying exams. It does not, however, leave much time for thesis research and may extend the time that the student needs to complete his or her degree.

Inquiries

For additional information on mechanical engineering graduate admissions, contact Joan Kravit or Una Sheehan. For general inquiries on the mechanical engineering graduate program, contact Leslie Regan. All can be reached in the MechE Graduate Office, Room 1-112, 617-253-2291, me-gradoffice@mit.edu.

Research Laboratories and Programs

The Mechanical Engineering Department is organized into seven areas that collectively capture the broad range of interests and activities within it. These areas are:

  • Mechanics: Modeling, Experimentation, and Computation
  • Design, Manufacturing, and Product Development
  • Controls, Instrumentation, and Robotics
  • Energy Science and Engineering
  • Ocean Science and Engineering
  • Bioengineering
  • Nano/Micro Science and Technology

The educational opportunities offered to students in mechanical engineering are enhanced by the availability of a wide variety of research laboratories and programs, and well-equipped shops and computer facilities.

The department provides many opportunities for undergraduates to establish a close relationship with faculty members and their research groups. Students interested in project work are encouraged to consult their faculty advisor or approach other members of the faculty.

Many members of the Department of Mechanical Engineering participate in interdepartmental or school-wide research activities. These include the Center for Biomedical Engineering, Center for Computational Engineering, Center for Materials Science and Engineering, Computation for Design and Optimization Program, Computational and Systems Biology Program, Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory, Institute for Soldier Nanotechnologies, Laboratory for Manufacturing and Productivity, MIT Energy Initiative, Operations Research Center, Program in Polymer Science and Technology and Sea Grant College Program. Detailed information about many of these can be found under Interdisciplinary Research and Study and Interdisciplinary Graduate Programs in Part 3. The department also hosts a number of industrial consortia, which support some laboratories and research projects. Research in the department is supported, in addition, by a broad range of federal agencies and foundations.

Below is a partial list of departmental laboratories, listed according to the seven core areas of research.

Mechanics: Modeling, Experimentation, and Computation

AMP Mechanical Behavior of Materials Laboratory

Mechanisms of deformation and fracture processes in engineering materials.

Center for Nonlinear Science

Interdisciplinary research into nonlinear phenomena. Incorporates the Nonlinear Dynamical Systems Lab (modeling, simulation, analysis), Nonlinear Dynamics Lab (experiments), and Nonlinear Systems Lab.

Composite Materials and Nondestructive Evaluation Laboratory

Development of quantitative nondestructive evaluation characterizations which are directly correlatable with the mechanical properties of materials and structures.

Finite Element Research Group

Computational procedures for the solution of problems in structural, solid, and fluid mechanics.

Hatsopoulos Microfluids Laboratory

Fundamental research on the behavior of complex fluid systems at microscopic scales, and associated engineering applications.

Design, Manufacturing, and Product Development

Auto-ID Laboratory

Creation of the "Internet of Things" using radio frequency identification and wireless sensor networks, and of a global system for tracking goods using a single numbering system called the Electronic Product Code.

Computer-Aided Design Laboratory

Advancing the state of the art in design methodology and computer-aided design methods.

Laboratory for Manufacturing and Productivity

An interdepartmental laboratory in the School of Engineering. Polymer microfabrication for microfluidic devices, chemical mechanical planarization for the semiconductor industry, precision macro- and micro-scale devices, and novel metrology methods for micro-scale devices. Small-scale fuel cells design, photovoltaic material and process research, and manufacture of photovoltaic panels. Identification technologies such as RFID, wireless sensors, and complex systems. Methods to integrate data and models across global networks. Factory-level manufacturing systems design and control, and supply chain design and management.  Environmentally benign manufacturing.

Martin Center for Engineering Design

Design methodology, design of integrated electrical-mechanical systems, prototype development, advanced computer-aided design techniques.

Park Center for Complex Systems

Research to understand complexity, educating students and scholars on complexity, designing complex systems for the benefit of humankind, and disseminating knowledge on complexity to the world at large.

Precision Engineering Laboratory

Fundamental and applied research on all aspects of the design, manufacture, and control of high precision machines ranging from manufacturing machines to precision consumer products.

Precision Systems Design and Manufacturing Laboratory

Modeling, design, and manufacturing methods for nanopositioning equipment, carbon nanotube-based mechanisms and machines, and compliant mechanisms.

Controls, Instrumentation, and Robotics

d'Arbeloff Laboratory for Information Systems and Technology

Research on mechatronics, home and health automation, interface between hardware and software, and development of sensing technologies.

Field and Space Robotics Laboratory

Fundamental physics of robotic systems for unstructured environments. Development, design, and prototyping of control and planning algorithms for robotic applications, including space exploration, rough terrains, sea systems, and medical devices and systems.

Nonlinear Systems Laboratory

Analysis and control of nonlinear physical systems with emphasis on adaptation and learning in robots.

Energy Science and Engineering

Center for Energy and Propulsion Research

Innovative science and technology for a sustainable energy future in a carbon-constrained world. Fundamental and applied research in energy conversion and transportation, with applications to low-carbon efficient energy and propulsion systems. Includes several research groups:

  • Electrochemical Energy Laboratory. Engineering of advanced materials for lithium batteries, proton exchange membrane and solid oxide fuel cells, and air battery and fuel cell hybrids.
  • Reacting Gas Dynamics Laboratory. Fluid flow, chemical reaction, and combustion phenomena associated with energy conversion in propulsion systems, power generation, industrial processes, and fires.
  • Sloan Automotive Laboratory. Processes and technology that control the performance, efficiency, and environmental impact of internal combustion engines, their lubrication, and fuel requirements.

Cryogenic Engineering Laboratory

Application of thermodynamics, heat transfer, and mechanical design to cryogenic processes and instrumentation and the operation of a liquid helium facility.

Rohsenow Kendall Heat Transfer Laboratory

Fundamental research in microscale/nanoscale transport, convection, laser/material interaction, and high heat fluxes; applied research in water purification, thermoelectric devices, energy-efficient buildings, and thermal management of electronics.

Ocean Science and Engineering

Center for Ocean Engineering

Provides an enduring ocean engineering identity, giving visibility to the outside world of MIT's commitment to the oceans, and serves as the focus point of ocean-related research at the Institute. Supports the research activities of the MIT/WHOI Joint Program in Oceanographic Engineering and the Naval Construction and Engineering Program. Encompasses the activities of the following research groups and laboratories:

  • Autonomous Marine Sensing Lab. Distributed ocean sensing concepts for oceanographic science, national defense, and coastal management and protection. Oceanographic sensing and modeling, sonar system technology, computational underwater acoustics, and marine robotics and communication networking.
  • Design Lab. Ship design, offshore structure design, marine robotics, geometric and solid modeling, advanced manufacturing, and shipbuilding. Includes the Center for Environmental Sensing and Modeling.
  • Experimental Hydrodynamics Lab. Advanced surface ship, offshore platform, and underwater vehicle design. Development of non-invasive flow measurement and visualization methods.
  • Impact and Crashworthiness Laboratory. Industry-oriented fracture testing and prediction technology of advanced high-strength steel sheets for automotive and shipbuilding applications. Includes both quasi-static and high strain rate response and effect of loading history on fracture.
  • Experimental and Nonlinear Dynamics Lab. Laboratory experiments to obtain insight into all manner of dynamical phenomena, from micro-scale diffusive processes to global-scale oceanic wave fields. Field studies for ocean-related problems.
  • Laboratory for Ship and Platform Flows. Modeling of free surface flows past conventional and high-speed vessels and estimation of their resistance and seakeeping in deep and shallow waters. Analytical and computational techniques.
  • Laboratory for Undersea Remote Sensing. Ocean exploration, undersea remote sensing of marine life and geophysical phenomena, wave propagation and scattering theory in remote sensing, statistical estimation and information theory, acoustics and seismics, Europa exploration.
  • Marine Hydrodynamics Laboratory (Propeller Tunnel). A variable-pressure recirculating water tunnel capable of speeds up to 10 m/s. Experiments are performed using state-of-the-art measurement techniques and instrumentation.
  • Multidisciplinary Ocean Dynamics and Engineering Laboratory. Complex physical and interdisciplinary oceanic dynamics and processes. Mathematical model and computation methods for ocean predictions, dynamical diagnostics, and for data assimilation and data-model comparisons.
  • Ocean Engineering Testing Tank. The tank is 108 feet long, 8.5 feet wide, with an average depth of 4.5 feet. The wave generator can generate harmonic or random waves. The tank also houses several laser flow visualization systems.
  • Vortical Flow Research Laboratory. Advanced capabilities for simulation of complex vertical flows. Powerful computer workstations and LINUX clusters, computer-video image conversion, and state-of-the-art flow simulation animation technologies.
  • MIT Sea Grant AUV Lab. Dedicated to autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs), the lab is a leading developer of advanced unmanned marine robots, with applications in oceanography, environmental monitoring, and underwater resource studies. It engages in instrumentation and algorithm development for underwater vehicles performing navigation- and information-intensive tasks. Various vehicle platforms, and fabrication tools and materials are available.

Bioengineering

Bioinstrumentation Laboratory

Utilization of biology, optics, mechanics, mathematics, electronics, and chemistry to develop innovative instruments for the analysis of biological processes and new devices for the treatment and diagnosis of disease.

Human and Machine Haptics

Interdisciplinary studies aimed at understanding human haptics, developing machine haptics, and enhancing human-machine interactions in virtual reality and teleoperator systems.

International Consortium for Medical Imaging Technology

Development and implementation of information technology that will lead to improved medical diagnosis and health care as well as reductions in costs.

Laboratory for Biomechanics of Cells and Biomolecules

Development of new instruments for the measurement of mechanical properties on the scale of a single cell or single molecule to better understand the interactions between biology and mechanics.

Newman Laboratory for Biomechanics and Human Rehabilitation

Research on bioinstrumentation, neuromuscular control, and technology for diagnosis and remediation of disabilities.

Nano/Micro Science and Technology

Pappalardo Laboratory for Micro/Nano Engineering

Creation of new engineering knowledge and products on the nano and micro scale through multidomain, multidisciplinary, and multiscale research.

back to top

Faculty and Staff

Faculty and Teaching Staff

Gang Chen, PhD
Carl Richard Soderberg Professor of Power Engineering
Director, Pappalardo Micro and Nano Engineering Laboratories
Director, Solid-State Solar-Thermal Energy Conservation Center
Department Head

Gareth H. McKinley, PhD
School of Engineering Professor of Teaching Innovation
Professor of Mechanical Engineering
Class of 1960 Fellow
Associate Department Head, Research

David E. Hardt, PhD
Ralph E. and Eloise F. Cross Professor of Mechanical Engineering
Professor of Engineering Systems
Associate Department Head, Education

Michael S. Triantafyllou, ScD
W. I. Koch Professor of Marine Technology
Professor of Mechanical and Ocean Engineering
Director, Center for Ocean Science and Engineering

Professors

Rohan Abeyaratne, PhD
Quentin Berg Professor of Mechanics
Director, Singapore–MIT Alliance for Research and Technology
(On sabbatical, spring)

Triantaphyllos R. Akylas, PhD
Professor of Mechanical Engineering

Lallit Anand, PhD
Warren and Towneley Rohsenow Professor of Mechanical Engineering

H. Harry Asada, PhD
Ford Professor of Engineering
Singapore Research Professor
Director, d'Arbeloff Laboratory for Information Systems and Technology

Arthur B. Baggeroer, ScD
Professor of Mechanical, Ocean, and Electrical Engineering

George Barbastathis, PhD
Professor of Mechanical Engineering
Singapore Research Professor
(On sabbatical)

Klaus-Jürgen Bathe, PhD, DSc, Dr-Ing Eh, Dr hc Mult
Professor of Mechanical Engineering
(On leave, spring)

Mary C. Boyce, PhD
Ford Professor of Engineering
(On leave)

John G. Brisson II, PhD
Professor of Mechanical Engineering
Director, MIT-Singapore University of Technology and Design Program

Wai K. Cheng, PhD
Professor of Mechanical Engineering

Chryssostomos Chryssostomidis, PhD
Henry L. and Grace Doherty Professor in Ocean Science and Engineering
Professor of Mechanical and Ocean Engineering
Director, MIT Sea Grant College Program

Jung-Hoon Chun, PhD
Professor of Mechanical Engineering
Director, Laboratory for Manufacturing and Productivity

Martin Culpepper, PhD
Professor of Mechanical Engineering

C. Forbes Dewey, Jr., PhD
Professor of Mechanical and Biological Engineering

Steven Dubowsky, ScD
Professor of Mechanical Engineering and Aeronautics and Astronautics

Daniel Frey, PhD
Professor of Mechanical Engineering and Engineering Systems

Ahmed F. Ghoniem, PhD
Ronald C. Crane Professor of Mechanical Engineering
Director, Center for Energy and Propulsion Research

Lorna J. Gibson, PhD
Matoula S. Salapatas Professor of Materials Science and Engineering
Professor of Mechanical Engineering

Leon R. Glicksman, PhD
Professor of Building Technology and Mechanical Engineering

David C. Gossard, PhD
Professor of Mechanical Engineering

Stephen C. Graves, PhD
Abraham J. Siegel Professor of Management Science
Professor of Engineering Systems and Mechanical Engineering
Interim Director, Engineering Systems Division

Linda G. Griffith, PhD
School of Engineering Professor of Teaching Innovation
Professor of Biological and Mechanical Engineering
Director, Center for Gynepathology Research
MacVicar Faculty Fellow

Alan J. Grodzinsky, PhD
Professor of Biological, Electrical, and Mechanical Engineering
Director, Center for Biomedical Engineering

Timothy G. Gutowski, PhD
Professor of Mechanical Engineering

Nicolas G. Hadjiconstantinou, PhD
Professor of Mechanical Engineering

Douglas P. Hart, PhD
Professor of Mechanical Engineering

John B. Heywood, PhD, DSc, DTech (hon), DSc (hon)
Professor of Mechanical Engineering
Sun Jae Professor of Mechanical Engineering, Emeritus

Neville J. Hogan, PhD, PhD (hon)
Sun Jae Professor of Mechanical Engineering
Professor of Brain and Cognitive Sciences
Director, Newman Laboratory for Biomechanics and Human Rehabilitation

Anette E. Hosoi, PhD
Professor of Mechanical Engineering and Applied Mathematics
MacVicar Faculty Fellow

Ian W. Hunter, PhD
Hatsopoulos Professor of Mechanical Engineering
Director, Laboratory for Bioinstrumentation
(On sabbatical)

Roger D. Kamm, PhD
Cecil and Ida Green Distinguished Professor of Biological and Mechanical Engineering
Director, Center for Emergent Behavior of Integrated Cellular Systems

Mujid Suliman Kazimi, PhD
TEPCO Professor of Nuclear and Mechanical Engineering
Director, Center for Advanced Nuclear Energy Systems

Sang-Gook Kim, PhD
Professor of Mechanical Engineering

Robert S. Langer, PhD
David H. Koch Institute Professor

Steven B. Leeb, PhD
Professor of Electrical and Mechanical Engineering
MacVicar Faculty Fellow

John J. Leonard, PhD
Professor of Mechanical and Ocean Engineering

John H. Lienhard V, PhD
Samuel C. Collins Professor of Mechanical Engineering
Director, KFUPM Center for Clean Water and Clean Energy
(On sabbatical)

Seth Lloyd, PhD
Professor of Mechanical Engineering

Nicholas C. Makris, PhD
Professor of Mechanical and Ocean Engineering
(On sabbatical, fall)

Scott Manalis, PhD
Professor of Biological and Mechanical Engineering and Media Arts and Sciences
Associate Member, Broad Institute

David M. Parks, PhD
Professor of Mechanical Engineering

Anthony T. Patera, PhD
Ford Professor of Engineering
Codirector, Center for Computational Engineering
(On sabbatical)

Nicholas M. Patrikalakis, PhD
Kawasaki Professor of Engineering
Professor of Mechanical and Ocean Engineering

Derek Rowell, PhD
Professor of Mechanical Engineering

Emanuel M. Sachs, PhD
Professor of Mechanical Engineering

Sanjay E. Sarma, PhD
Fred Fort Flowers '41 and Daniel Fort Flowers '41 Professor of Mechanical Engineering
Director, Digital Learning
MacVicar Faculty Fellow

Henrik Schmidt, PhD
Professor of Mechanical and Ocean Engineering

Paul D. Sclavounos, PhD
Professor of Mechanical Engineering and Naval Architecture

Warren P. Seering, PhD
Weber-Shaughness Professor of Mechanical Engineering and Engineering Systems
Codirector, System Design and Management Program

Yang Shao-Horn, PhD
Gail E. Kendall Professor of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science and Engineering

Alexander H. Slocum, PhD
Neil and Jane Pappalardo Professor of Mechanical Engineering

Jean-Jacques E. Slotine, PhD
Professor of Mechanical Engineering, Information Sciences, and Brain and Cognitive Sciences
Director, Nonlinear Systems Laboratory

Peter T. C. So, PhD
Professor of Mechanical and Biological Engineering

Subra Suresh, ScD
Vannevar Bush Professor of Engineering
Professor of Materials Science and Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, and Biological Engineering
(On leave)

Mark W. Thomas, PhD
Professor of the Practice of Naval Construction and Engineering

David L. Trumper, PhD
Professor of Mechanical Engineering

J. Kim Vandiver, PhD
Professor of Mechanical and Ocean Engineering
Director, Edgerton Center
Dean for Undergraduate Research

David Wallace, PhD
Professor of Mechanical Engineering and Engineering Systems
Codirector, MIT-CAD Lab
MacVicar Faculty Fellow

Richard M. Wiesman, PhD
Professor of the Practice of Mechanical Engineering

Tomasz Wierzbicki, ScD
Professor of Applied Mechanics

James H. Williams, Jr., PhD
Professor of Mechanical Engineering and Writing
School of Engineering Professor of Teaching Excellence, Emeritus

Ioannis V. Yannas, PhD
Professor of Mechanical Engineering, Polymer Science, and Biological Engineering

Kamal Youcef-Toumi, ScD
Professor of Mechanical Engineering

Dick Kau-Ping Yue, ScD
Philip J. Solondz Professor of Engineering
Professor of Mechanical and Ocean Engineering
(On sabbatical)

Associate Professors

Tonio Buonassisi, PhD
Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering and Manufacturing

Domitilla Del Vecchio, PhD
Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering

Nicholas Xuanlai Fang, PhD
d'Arbeloff Career Development Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering

Jeffrey C. Grossman, PhD
Carl Richard Soderberg Associate Professor of Power Engineering
Associate Professor of Mechanical and Materials Science and Engineering

A. John Hart, PhD
Mitsui Career Development Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering

Franz Hover, PhD
Finmeccanica Career Development Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering

Joseph Jacobson, PhD
Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering and Media Arts and Sciences

Rohit N. Karnik, PhD
Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering

Jerod W. Ketcham, NE
Associate Professor of the Practice of Naval Construction and Engineering

Pierre F. J. Lermusiaux, PhD
Associate Professor of Mechanical and Ocean Engineering
(On sabbatical)

Thomas Peacock, PhD
Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering

Alexandra H. Techet, PhD
Associate Professor of Mechanical and Ocean Engineering

Kripa Varanasi, PhD
Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering

Evelyn N. Wang, PhD
Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering

Maria C. Yang, PhD
Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering

Assistant Professors

Mark Bathe, PhD
Assistant Professor of Biological and Mechanical Engineering

Cullen Buie, PhD
Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering

Kenneth Kamrin, PhD
Class of 1956 Career Development Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering

Sangbae Kim, PhD
Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering

Alexie M. Kolpak, PhD
Rockwell International Career Development Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering

Pedro M. Reis, PhD
Assistant Professor of Mechanical and Civil and Environmental Engineering

Themistoklis Sapsis, PhD
American Bureau of Shipping Career Development Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering

Konstantin Turitsyn, PhD
Esther and Harold G. Edgerton Career Development Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering

Amos Winter, PhD
Noyce Career Development Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering

Senior Lecturers

John P. Appleton, PhD
Daniel Braunstein, PhD
Ronald Campbell, PhD
Stephen D. Fantone, PhD
Dean Kamen, PhD
Raymond McCord, PhD
Hilario L. Oh, PhD
William Plummer, PhD
Mark Schattenburg, PhD
Amy Smith, MechEng
Simona Socrate, PhD
Barrick F. Tibbitts, NE
Myron Spector, MD
Abbott Weiss, PhD

Lecturers

Julio Guerrero, PhD
Rajiv Gupta, PhD
Hamid Hashemi, PhD
Richard Kimball, PhD

Instructors

Harrison Chin, PhD
Barbara Hughey, PhD

Technical Instructors

Stephen G. Banzaert
Benita Comeau, PhD
David Dow
Pierce Hayward
Patrick McAtamney

Research Staff

Senior Research Engineers/Scientists

Anuradha Annaswamy, PhD
Stanley B. Gershwin, PhD
Lynette A. Jones, PhD
Mandayam A. Srinivasan, PhD

Principal Research Engineers/Scientists

Karl Iagnemma, PhD
H. Igo Krebs, PhD
Yuming Liu, PhD
Tian Tian, PhD
Victor Wong, PhD

Research Engineers/Scientists

Arjuna Balasuriya, PhD
Michael Benjamin, PhD
Svitlana Boryskina, PhD
Stefano Brizzolara, PhD
Christopher Carlton, PhD
Patrick Haley, PhD
Kelli Hendrickson, PhD
Nora C. Hogan, PhD
Michael Kaess, PhD
George E. Kaniadakis, PhD
Santosh Shanbhogue, PhD
Jun Xu, PhD

Postdoctoral Associates

Jooeun Ahn, PhD
Christos Altantzis, PhD
Kiara Areti, PhD
Nongnuch Artrith, PhD
Mojtaba Azadi Sohi, PhD
Sankha Banerjee, PhD
Amy Marlou Bilton, PhD
Nicholas Boechler, PhD
Dephine Bresch-Pietri, PhD
Miha Brojan, PhD
Michael J. Cheadle, PhD
Seongkeun Cho, PhD
Jefrrey Brian Chou, PhD
John Cuffe, PhD
Navdeep Singh Dhillon, PhD
Jens Lohne Eftang, PhD
Jiansheng Feng, PhD
Zhenxing Feng, PhD
Bruno M. Figliuzzi, PhD
Stephanie E. Fried, PhD
Jun Fu, PhD
Katherin K. Fu, PhD
Jivtesh Garg, PhD
Hadi Ghasemi, PhD
Ramin Ghelichi, PhD
Zheng Gong, PhD
Alexis Grimaud, PhD
Jeffrey Hanna, PhD
Nevin C. Hanumara, PhD
Yousef Haseli, PhD
Brian Hemond, PhD
David L. Henann, PhD
Qing Hu, PhD
Yongjie Hu, PhD
Xiaopeng Huang, PhD
Dong Jin Hyun, PhD
Jose I. Jimenez Zarco, PhD
Dafei Jin, PhD
Carl J. Kamp, PhD
Samuel M. Kelly, PhD
Dallwoo Kim, PhD
Brian Kolb, PhD
Maha Khayyat, PhD
Arnaud Lazarus, PhD
Matthieu Leclair, PhD
Howon Lee, PhD
Yueh Lin Lee, PhD
Xiansen, Li, PhD
Xiaobo Li, PhD
Jong-Min Lim, PhD
Amy Marie Marconnet, PhD
Dora I. Medina Medina, PhD
Matthieu Mercier, PhD
Nenad Miljkovic, PhD
Chris Mirabito, PhD
Shankar Narayanan, PhD
Kayzad Nilgiriwala, PhD
Lenin M. Paredes Tobar, PhD
Hae won Park, PhD
Soo Youl Park, PhD
James D. Penn, PhD
Jonathan C. Petruccelli, PhD
Dmitriy Podolskiy, PhD
Nir Pour, PhD
Bo Qiu, PhD
Rishi Raj, PhD
Elisha Rejovitsky, PhD
Marcel Risch, PhD
Sergio R. Rivera Rodriguez, PhD
Stephan Rudykh, PhD
Elham Sahraei Esfahani, PhD
Toby E. Schneider, PhD
Reza Sharifi Sedeh, PhD
Kathrin Smetana, PhD
Damoon Soudbakhsh, PhD
Zakia Sultana, PhD
Nagarajan Thoppey Mathuraman, PhD
Angelos Tsoukalas, PhD
Mruthunjaya Uddi, PhD
Sylvain P. Vallaghe, PhE
Annelies Vandersickel, PhD
Konstantina Vogiatzaki, PhD
Erik J. Wilhelm, PhD
Dalei Wu, PhD
Fangfan Xie, PhD
Sungwoo Yang, PhD
Yuan Yang, PhD
Masayuki Yano, PhD
Selcuk Yerci, PhD
Jie Yin, PhD
Pei Zhang, PhD

Professors Emeriti

Ali S. Argon, ScD
Quentin Berg Professor of Mechanical Engineering, Emeritus

A. Douglas Carmichael, PhD
Professor of Mechanical and Power Engineering, Emeritus

Ernest G. Cravalho, PhD
Professor of Mechanical Engineering, Emeritus

Ira Dyer, PhD
Professor of Mechanical and Ocean Engineering, Emeritus

James A. Fay, PhD
Professor of Mechanical Engineering, Emeritus

Woodie C. Flowers, PhD
Pappalardo Professor of Mechanical Engineering, Emeritus

Ernst G. Frankel, PhD, DBA
Professor of Mechanical Engineering and Marine Systems, Emeritus

Peter Griffith, ScD
Professor of Mechanical Engineering, Emeritus

Justin E. Kerwin, PhD
Professor of Mechanical Engineering and Naval Architecture, Emeritus

Shih-Ying Lee, ScD
Professor of Mechanical Engineering, Emeritus

Richard H. Lyon, PhD, DrEng (hon)
Professor of Mechanical Engineering, Emeritus

Henry S. Marcus, DBA
Professor of Marine Systems, Emeritus

Koichi Masubuchi, PhD
Kawasaki Professor of Engineering, Emeritus
Professor of Mechanical and Ocean Engineering and Materials Sciences and Engineering, Emeritus

Chiang C. Mei, PhD
Professor of Mechanical and Civil Engineering, Emeritus
Ford Professor of Engineering, Emeritus

Borivoje B. Mikić, ScD
Professor of Mechanical Engineering, Emeritus

Jerome H. Milgram, PhD
Professor of Mechanical and Ocean Engineering, Emeritus
William I. Koch Professor of Marine Technology, Emeritus

J. Nicholas Newman, ScD
Professor of Mechanical Engineering and Naval Architecture, Emeritus

T. Francis Ogilvie, PhD
Professor of Mechanical and Ocean Engineering, Emeritus

Carl R. Peterson, ScD
Professor of Mechanical Engineering, Emeritus

Ronald F. Probstein, PhD
Ford Professor of Engineering, Emeritus

Thomas B. Sheridan, ScD, D (hon)
Ford Professor of Engineering and Applied Psychology, Emeritus

Nam P. Suh, PhD, LHD (hon), EngD (hon), TekD (hon)
Ralph E. and Eloise F. Cross Professor of Mechanical Engineering, Emeritus

Neil E. Todreas, PhD
Professor of Nuclear and Mechanical Engineering, Emeritus

Charles M. Vest, PhD
Professor of Mechanical Engineering, Emeritus
President Emeritus

David Gordon Wilson, PhD
Professor of Mechanical Engineering, Emeritus

Gerald L. Wilson, ScD
Vannevar Bush Professor of Electrical and Mechanical Engineering, Emeritus

 

need help?  |  change log  |  back to top