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MIT Course Catalog 2013-2014

Home > Schools & Courses > Management > Management Programs

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Sloan School of Management

Undergraduate Study

Bachelor of Science in Management Science/Course 15
[see degree chart]

The MIT Sloan School of Management offers an undergraduate degree program in management science. This innovative curriculum is designed to prepare students for top jobs in today's technologically oriented business world. By combining the General Institute Requirements with subjects in the MIT Sloan School of Management, students learn a unique combination of problem solving and managerial skills, which allow them to excel in high-demand areas such financial engineering, market analysis, and big data analytics.

In recent years, the field of management science has grown rapidly in conjunction with advances in technology, methods for collecting and structuring large quantities of data, and the building of sophisticated mathematical models. The MIT Sloan School's undergraduate degree program develops expertise in probability, statistics, and computer programming, and a strong background in economics, accounting, communication, and managerial psychology. Students learn to apply this knowledge within a variety of managerial functions. Each student completes a concentration of four subjects in one of four areas: finance, information technologies, marketing science, or business analytics and operations research.

MIT Sloan undergraduates take many management-related electives, alongside MBA and other graduate students. This arrangement provides an excellent opportunity for undergraduates to learn from students with previous business experience. The SB degree in management science gives students the best of both worlds—technical and managerial excellence.

Minor in Management

The Minor in Management provides undergraduates in other majors with an understanding of the business, human, social, and organizational dimensions of scientific and technological enterprise.

The minor consists of six subjects, three required:

15.301 Managerial Psychology Laboratory
  or
15.668 People and Organizations

  Plus the following two subjects:
15.501 Corporate Financial Accounting
15.812 Marketing Management

Plus, any three Course 15 subjects (other than UROP, Special Studies, Special Seminars, and general-elective transfer credit) that are not designated as restricted to students in other Sloan School programs. (Two six-unit subjects will be counted as a single elective subject.) Subject 14.01 is also a permissible elective.

Minor in Management Science

The Minor in Management Science introduces undergraduates in other majors to the techniques of quantitative business analysis and their application to practical problems. Its focus reflects the core content of the SB degree program in management science.

The minor consists of six subjects, four required:

6.041 Probabilistic Systems Analysis
14.01 Principles of Microeconomics
15.053 Optimization Methods in Management Science
15.075J Statistical Thinking and Data Analysis

Plus, two Course 15 subjects selected from a list of restricted electives. (Two six-unit subjects will be counted as a single elective subject.)

Interdepartmental (Non-Sloan) Students

MIT students from other departments are welcome to take unrestricted elective subjects at MIT Sloan, if they have taken the listed prerequisites. All students who wish to take Sloan graduate subjects must participate in the MIT Sloan course bidding system. Information about the process is available on the bidding website at https://sloanbid.mit.edu/. Bidding occurs at the same time as online WebSIS pre-registration in December and May for the following terms. The MIT Sloan course schedule is available on the bidding website, as are most class syllabi, to assist students in subject selection. Staff in Sloan Educational Services, Room E52-101, 617-253-1510, are always available to assist all students and provide information about MIT Sloan classes and the course bidding system.

Inquiries

For additional information about these Sloan undergraduate programs, students may consult the Office of Undergraduate Education, Room E52-430, 617-253-8614, and the MIT Sloan undergraduate website, http://mitsloan.mit.edu/undergrad/.

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Graduate Study

The MIT Sloan School of Management offers opportunity for graduate study leading to the degrees of Master of Business Administration, Master of Science in Management, Master of Science in Management of Technology, Master of Finance, Master of Science in Management Studies, and Doctor of Philosophy. In addition, there are two dual degree options: an MBA/SM with the School of Engineering, known as the Leaders for Global Operations (LGO) program; and an MBA/MPP or MPA with the Harvard Kennedy School.

Entrance Requirements for Graduate Study

Applications are welcome from college graduates in all areas of concentration—the humanities, social sciences, physical sciences, and engineering. Matriculants must have completed formal subjects in calculus and in microeconomics. The minimum level of preparation is normally a one-year subject in economic theory and a one-year subject in calculus. If these subjects have not been taken in a previous academic program, applicants may be required to complete them prior to enrollment.

All applicants, including those from foreign countries, must take the Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT). Information is available from the Graduate Management Admission Council, Educational Testing Service, Princeton, NJ 08541. MBA, MFin, doctoral program, and Leaders for Global Operations applicants may use GRE scores in place of GMAT scores.

Master of Business Administration and Master of Science in Management

The MIT Sloan School MBA program offers a course of study in graduate management education, leading to a master's degree in Business Administration (MBA) or Master of Science in Management (SM). Degree candidates are admitted in spring to a program that begins with a mandatory orientation program in August. The two-year program of study requires candidates to complete a core curriculum plus 144 units of H- or G-level elective subjects. Students also fulfill research and leadership requirements through activities in the mid-term Sloan Innovation Period and through elective coursework. Residency for four academic terms is required. A grade point average (GPA) of 4.0/5.0 (B) is required at the time of graduation.

The MBA curriculum is designed for maximum flexibility, allowing students to create an individual program best suited to their needs and career interests. During the first term, students take a sequence of core subjects with the option of one of four elective subjects.

In the first term, MBA students are assigned to one of 60 teams consisting of six to seven people. These teams are combined into six larger sections, called cohorts or oceans, for the fall core subjects. Students take all the core subjects in the same assigned section, which facilitates cohort integration and the formation of study groups.

After the first term, students have a wide range of elective subject choices. Students are given a great deal of independence in choosing their subjects, and they may design a program that includes a depth of focus as well as breadth. This includes the option of earning a certificate by enrolling in and completing the elective requirements for a track or certificate program. The MBA Program currently offers four certificates, in finance, enterprise management, entrepreneurship and innovation, and sustainability.

The Sloan Innovation Period, offered each term, provides students and faculty with the opportunity to explore jointly, in a nontraditional setting, what makes MIT Sloan unique: exceptional research expertise, leadership acumen, and the hands-on application of knowledge.

Practical exposure to management takes place in the MIT Sloan School through a variety of activities. Students in the MBA program are expected to spend the summer between their first and second years working in an activity or internship that contributes to their understanding of and effectiveness in dealing with management problems.

During the academic year students have additional opportunities both in and outside the classroom to apply their learning. Many Sloan subjects incorporate action learning into their pedagogy and require students to complete projects within companies and organizations as a deliverable for the subject. These subjects may include a 1-3 week international or domestic experience working within a host organization. Corporate leaders are often invited to work with students either through guest lectureships in classes or through interaction with one of the more than 60 student organizations. Some students may also have the opportunity to work as paid teaching and research assistants to the Sloan faculty.

Outside of the classroom, the MBA community's student organizations and clubs provide students the opportunity to practice leadership through the execution of conferences, international study tours and treks, business plan and case competitions, and other club-related activities.

Master of Finance

The Master of Finance (MFin) prepares students for a broad range of careers in finance requiring analytical rigor and the ability to innovate around market challenges. The 12-month (July–June) program consists of required fundamental and advanced subjects, restricted and general electives, action learning, ethics modules, and an optional master's thesis. Practical training is an important component of a student's preparation. MFin students are expected when possible to take advantage of the January Independent Activities Period (IAP) as an opportunity to gain practical experience in an area of finance. International students must check with the International Students Office to ensure compliance with immigration regulations before participating in practical training.

Required summer-term coursework provides the foundation in finance and accounting for continuing with more advanced required and elective subjects in the fall and spring terms. Restricted and general electives ensure appropriate depth as well as opportunities for breadth of study, depending on the student's interest. Students are required to take either a proseminar or the Finance Research Practicum™; project-based classes in which students work in teams to address current problems identified by finance professionals. A thesis option is available in lieu of one or more general elective subjects for students who wish to research a topic of particular interest.

Frequent seminars, conferences, and major lectures present students with opportunities to hear from recognized leaders from a variety of industries. MFin students have full access to the extensive resources of the MIT Sloan Career Development Office as well as the MIT Career Development Center. In addition, students participate in a wide array of professional clubs, student government, sports teams, and organizations at the school and campus level.

To graduate, students must attain at least a B (GPA of 4.0/5.0) at the time of graduation. Residency for three consecutive academic terms (summer, fall, spring) is required. Students may not pursue another degree program while enrolled in the MFin. Except in the case of core requirements, coursework completed at MIT prior to matriculation in the MFin program may not be applied toward the MFin degree without the approval of the MFin faculty director.

In addition to the traditional synergies among finance, economics, and accounting, the program exploits intellectual ties between finance and mathematics, statistics, psychology, management, computer science, and engineering. The program is primarily targeted at recent graduates with zero to two years of experience. Recent graduates of postgraduate programs in mathematics, science, and engineering who wish to enter the finance profession are also encouraged to apply.

Typically, applications to the MFin program are due in early November (Round 1) and early January (Round 2); decisions are usually announced by mid-January and mid-March, respectively. This is subject to change. Please refer to our website for exact deadlines.

Master of Science in Management Studies

The Master of Science in Management Studies (MSMS) program is a customizable advanced master's degree that complements an overseas management education. Designed for students in non-US business schools who are in the process of completing or have already completed their MBA (or comparable master's) degree, the MSMS program allows students to pursue their area of interest in management and construct an individualized curriculum of all-elective subjects from the offerings at MIT Sloan, other MIT departments, and Harvard University. Students specialize in a specific area within management by designating a concentration, taking elective subjects, and working with a Sloan faculty member to write a compulsory master's thesis in their area of study. Applicants from our international partner and cooperating schools are especially encouraged to apply.

The 9-month program, which runs from September to June, requires full-time residence. In addition, MSMS students are required to meet MIT's requirement of at least 66 units of G- or H-level subjects, of which at least 42 units must be H-level, and a master's thesis. To graduate, students must attain a GPA of 4.0/5.0 (B) by the time of graduation. For more information, visit http://mitsloan.mit.edu/msms/.

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System Design and Management Program: Master of Science in Engineering and Management

Jointly sponsored by the School of Engineering and the MIT Sloan School, the System Design and Management (SDM) program targets experienced engineers and product development professionals who seek to build upon their technical background and advance to positions of leadership in their careers.

The SDM program was created in 1996, in response to a critical need expressed by government and industry to provide future engineering leaders with an educational experience that combines an engineering systems perspective with the essentials of a management education. The program has focused on developing competencies in the areas of systems thinking, management skills, leadership, and an end-to-end understanding of systems development.

SDM is offered in three formats, including a 13-month full-time on-campus program and two career-compatible 24-month programs—half-time on campus for local-area commuter students and a distance delivery option via synchronous video conferencing. SDM is the only MIT degree program that can be completed primarily through distance education.

Program applicants have significant engineering and/or managerial experience, in addition to a scientific or engineering education. On average, SDM student-fellows have about 10 years of work experience. The program participants come from both private and government institutions, either as company sponsored, or as self-sponsored students. A majority of SDM students have advanced degrees in other fields, and over half come from countries other than the United States.

The SDM program begins in January. Applications are accepted on a continuous basis, with an early notification deadline of May 15 and a final cutoff of October 15 for admission to the next cohort. For additional information, contact the SDM Program Office, Room E40-315, 617-253-1055, sdm@mit.edu, or visit http://sdm.mit.edu/. See also Engineering Systems Division in Part 2.

Leaders for Global Operations Program: Dual Master's Degrees in Management and Engineering

The 24-month Leaders for Global Operations (LGO) program combines graduate education in engineering and management for those with two or more years of full-time work experience who aspire to leadership positions in manufacturing or operations companies. A required six-month internship comprising a research project at one of LGO's partner companies leads to a dual-degree thesis, culminating in two master's degrees—an MBA (or SM in management) and an SM in engineering. The program is offered jointly through the MIT Sloan School of Management and the School of Engineering master's programs in Aeronautics and Astronautics, Biological Engineering, Chemical Engineering, Civil and Environmental Engineering, Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Engineering Systems, and Mechanical Engineering. For more information, general requirements, and application procedures, visit the LGO website at http://lgo.mit.edu/.

Doctor of Philosophy

The purpose of the MIT Sloan School's PhD program is to prepare students for careers in teaching and research or, to a lesser extent, for positions requiring advanced research and analytical capabilities. The PhD program provides the opportunity to combine in-depth work in theory with work in broadly defined "applied" areas, with faculty who are experts in their fields.

A candidate entering with a bachelor's degree should be able to complete the program in four or five years. The first year is devoted to work in the basic disciplines of management and to preliminary work in the student's major and minor fields. The second year is primarily devoted to the major and minor fields. Finally, two or three years are required for the doctoral dissertation.

Major and Minor Fields

Candidates must master the literature, theory, and application of a major field of concentration as well as a minor field. Successful completion of this requirement is determined by General Examinations. The major fields in the MIT Sloan School are:

Accounting and Control
Economic Sociology
Finance
Information Technologies
Marketing
Operations Management
Organization Studies
System Dynamics
Technological Innovation, Entrepreneurship, and Strategic Management
Work and Employment Research

PhD candidates enter the program specializing in an appropriate minor field—typically a theoretical discipline that provides a foundation for research in the major field. Major fields such as accounting or marketing usually have economics as a minor field, while organization studies has behavioral science.

The subject requirements for the major and minor fields are not rigid. There are normal groups of subjects for the standard fields, but substitutions of other subjects and independent study are possible. Regardless of the major and minor fields chosen, a plan of study designed to prepare the student for General Examinations is worked out by the student and his or her faculty advisor(s).

The General Examinations normally are taken at the end of the second year or beginning of the third year of study, after completion of major and minor field coursework and a research paper (see below). The exact form of general exams varies and may involve written examinations, critiques of research papers, or review papers on prescribed topics. In all cases, the last stage is an oral examination.

The MIT Sloan School is committed to research, and the philosophy and structure of the PhD program reflect this professional commitment. There are two separate research requirements: the master's thesis and the PhD dissertation.

Upon satisfactory completion of the master's thesis and fulfillment of all Institute requirements for a master's degree, MIT Sloan PhD students are awarded the Master of Management Research.

A substantial part of the student's work in the latter half of the first year and in the second year is devoted to an independent research project. The topic, design, and execution of the project are left to the student, while advice and criticism are provided by a research advisor and other interested faculty. Upon completion of the project, the student submits a master's thesis.

The PhD dissertation consists of significant scholarly research in some area of management. Close working relationships with faculty are established early so that the thesis can be defined as a manageable project as early as possible. Candidates typically require two or three years of full-time work to complete their theses.

There is no foreign language requirement in the MIT Sloan School's PhD program, although in some cases the student and his or her advisor may decide that further study of a foreign language is necessary if the student is to work effectively in his or her major field.

Teaching and Research Assistantships

All doctoral students in the MIT Sloan School are eligible to apply for the approximately 100 part-time research and teaching assistantships available each year.

Inquiries

For information on MIT Sloan programs, visit http://mitsloan.mit.edu/phd/.

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Master's Degree Programs for Mid-Career Executives

MIT Sloan Fellows Program in Innovation and Global Leadership

This full-time, 12-month (June-June) immersive MBA program is designed for high-performing mid-career professionals. The program typically enrolls more than 100 outstanding individuals with 10-20 years of professional experience from over two dozen nations, representing a wide variety of for-profit and nonprofit industries, organizations, and functional areas. Many participants are sponsored by or have the strong support of their employers, but the program also admits independent participants, many with unique entrepreneurial experiences and perspectives.

The program is characterized by a rigorous academic curriculum, frequent interactions with international business and government leaders, and a valuable exchange of global perspectives. The fellows work together in a team environment, tackling practical issues with a spirit of intellectual adventure. After collaborating across disciplines, cultures, and backgrounds in this intense learning environment, they leave the program with a robust alumni network and the skills necessary to create change, build alliances, and drive global ventures.

For more information about the MIT Sloan Fellows Program in Innovation and Global Leadership and how to apply, visit http://mitsloan.mit.edu/fellows/ or contact the program office, Room E52-325, 617-253-8600, fax 617-252-1200, fellows@sloan.mit.edu.

Executive MBA

The MIT Executive MBA is a rigorous 20-month, executive schedule Master of Business Administration that builds on MIT Sloan’s history of distinguished MBA programs and mid-career education. The classroom-based program is designed to develop principled, innovative leaders, usually with a decade or more of work experience, who can transform the world's most important institutions. The MIT Executive MBA is an opportunity to join an elite forum for innovation and leadership in which mid-career executives develop an edge in their general management skills and build a business network that lasts a lifetime.

The program brings together rising executives from diverse industries to collaborate on the complex challenges they face now—and will face in years to come—within their organizations and within the larger international marketplace. Although a large proportion of MIT EMBAs come from careers in life science, engineering, and technology, our ranks also include leaders in government, start-ups, nonprofits, finance, and the military. All are inspired by this rare opportunity to drive positive change, master the science of management, and integrate global leadership and data-driven analytics.

For more information about the MIT Executive MBA and how to apply, visit http://emba.mit.edu/ or contact the program office, Room E52-325, 617-253-5033, executivemba@mit.edu.

Other Programs

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Computation for Design and Optimization

The Computation for Design and Optimization (CDO) program offers a master's degree to students interested in the analysis and application of computational approaches to designing and operating engineered systems. The curriculum is designed with a common core serving all engineering disciplines and an elective component focusing on specific applications. Current MIT graduate students may pursue a CDO master's degree in conjunction with a department-based master's or PhD program. For more information, see the full program description under Interdisciplinary Graduate Programs in Part 3, or visit http://computationalengineering.mit.edu/education/.

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Faculty and Staff

David C. Schmittlein, PhD
Professor of Marketing
John C Head III Dean

S. P. Kothari, PhD
Gordon Y Billard Professor of Management
Professor of Accounting
Deputy Dean

Alan F. White
Senior Lecturer
Senior Associate Dean

Faculty and Teaching Staff

Professors

Deborah G. Ancona, PhD
Seley Distinguished Professor of Management
Director, MIT Leadership Center

Paul Asquith, PhD
Gordon Y Billard Professor of Finance

Arnold I. Barnett, PhD
George Eastman Professor of Management Science
Professor of Statistics

Ernst R. Berndt, PhD
Louis E. Shipley Professor in Applied Economics

Dimitris Bertsimas, PhD
Boeing Leaders for Global Operations Professor of Management
Codirector, Operations Research Center

Erik Brynjolfsson, PhD
Schussel Family Professor of Management Science
Director, MIT Center for Digital Business

John S. Carroll, PhD
Morris A. Adelman Professor of Management
Professor of Engineering Systems

John E. Core, PhD
Nanyang Technological University Professor

John C. Cox, PhD
Nomura Professor of Finance

Michael A. Cusumano, PhD
Sloan Management Review Distinguished Professor of Management
Professor of Engineering Systems

Joseph J. Doyle, Jr., PhD
Erwin H. Schell Professor of Management
Professor of Applied Economics

Steven D. Eppinger, ScD
General Motors Leaders for Global Operations Professor of Management
Professor of Engineering Systems
Codirector, System Design and Management Program

Roberto M. Fernández, PhD
William F. Pounds Professor of Management

Charles H. Fine, PhD
Chrysler Leaders for Global Operations Professor of Management
Professor of Engineering Systems
Codirector, International Motor Vehicle Program

Kristin J. Forbes, PhD
Jerome and Dorothy Lemelson Professor of Management

Robert M. Freund, PhD
Theresa Seley Professor of Management Science

David D. Gamarnik, PhD
Nanyang Technological University Professor

Robert S. Gibbons, PhD
Sloan Distinguished Professor of Management

Stephen C. Graves, PhD
Abraham J. Siegel Professor of Management Science
Professor of Engineering Systems and Mechanical Engineering
Interim Director, Engineering Systems Division

Michelle Hanlon, PhD
Howard W. Johnson Professor of Accounting

John R. Hauser, ScD
Kirin Professor of Marketing

Yasheng Huang, PhD
International Program Professor of Chinese Economy and Business

Simon H. Johnson, PhD
Ronald A. Kurtz (1954) Professor of Entrepreneurship

Christopher Knittel, PhD
William Barton Rogers Professor of Energy Economics

Thomas A. Kochan, PhD
George Maverick Bunker Professor of Management
Professor of Engineering Systems
Codirector, Institute for Work and Employment Research

Leonid Kogan, PhD
Nippon Telegraph and Telephone Professor of Management

Retsef Levi, PhD
J. Spencer Standish (1945) Professor of Management

John D. C. Little, PhD
Institute Professor

Andrew W. Lo, PhD
Harris and Harris Group Professor
Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
Director, Laboratory for Financial Engineering

Deborah J. Lucas, PhD
Professor of Finance

Stuart E. Madnick, PhD
John Norris Maguire (1960) Professor of Information Technology
Professor of Engineering Systems
Codirector, PROFIT Program

Thomas L. Magnanti, PhD
Professor of Operations Research
Institute Professor

Thomas W. Malone, PhD
Patrick J. McGovern (1959) Professor of Management
Director, MIT Center for Collective Intelligence

Robert C. Merton, PhD
School of Management Distinguished Professor of Finance

Stewart C. Myers, PhD
Robert C. Merton (1970) Professor of Financial Economics

Wanda J. Orlikowski, PhD
Alfred P. Sloan Professor of Management

James B. Orlin, PhD
E. Pennell Brooks (1917) Professor of Management

Paul Osterman, PhD
Nanyang Technological University Professor of Human Resources and Management
Codirector, Institute for Work and Employment Research

Jun Pan, PhD
School of Management Distinguished Professor of Finance

Jonathan Parker, PhD
Professor of Finance

Georgia Perakis, PhD
William F. Pounds Professor of Management
Codirector, Leaders for Global Operations Program

Robert S. Pindyck, PhD
Bank of Tokyo–Mitsubishi Ltd. Professor of Finance and Economics

Drazen Prelec, PhD
Digital Equipment Corporation Leaders for Global Operations Professor of Management
Professor of Management Science, Economics, and Brain and Cognitive Sciences

Ray E. Reagans, PhD
Alfred P. Sloan Professor of Management

Nelson Repenning, PhD
Professor of System Dynamics
Director, Executive MBA and Sloan Fellows Program

Roberto Rigobón, PhD
Society of Sloan Fellows Professor of Management

Edward B. Roberts, PhD
David Sarnoff Professor of Management Technology
Chair, Martin Trust Center for MIT Entrepreneurship

Stephen A. Ross, PhD
Franco Modigliani Professor of Financial Economics

Antoinette Schoar, PhD
Michael M. Koerner (1949) Professor of Entrepreneurship

Andreas S. Schulz, PhD
Patrick J. McGovern (1959) Professor of Management

Duncan Simester, PhD
Nanyang Technological University Professor of Marketing

John D. Sterman, PhD
Jay W. Forrester Professor of Management
Professor of Engineering Systems
Director, System Dynamics Group

Scott Stern, PhD
School of Management Distinguished Professor of Technological Innovation, Entrepreneurship, and Strategic Management

Thomas M. Stoker, PhD
Gordon Y Billard Professor of Management and Economics

James M. Utterback, PhD
David J. McGrath, Jr. (1959) Professor of Management and Innovation
Professor of Engineering Systems

John E. Van Maanen, PhD
Erwin H. Schell Professor of Management

Eric A. von Hippel, PhD
T. Wilson (1953) Professor of Management
Professor of Engineering Systems

Jiang Wang, PhD
Mizuho Financial Group Professor

Joseph P. Weber, PhD
George Maverick Bunker Professor of Management
Professor of Accounting

Roy E. Welsch, PhD
Eastman Kodak Leaders for Global Operations Professor of Management
Professor of Engineering Systems
Director, Center for Computational Research in Economics and Management Science

Birger Wernerfelt, DBA
J. C. Penney Professor of Management
Professor of Marketing

Michael D. Whinston, PhD
Professor of Organizational Economics

JoAnne Yates, PhD
Sloan Distinguished Professor of Management
Professor of Managerial Communication

Ezra W. Zuckerman Sivan, PhD
Nanyang Technological University Professor
Codirector, Economic Sociology PhD Program
Chair, PhD Program

Associate Professors

SInan Aral, PhD
Associate Professor of Information Technology and Marketing

Pierre Azoulay, PhD
Sloan Distinguished Associate Professor in Management

Nittai Bergman, PhD
Nanyang Technological University Associate Professor of Finance

Emilio J. Castilla, PhD
Associate Professor of Management

Hui Chen, PhD
Jon D. Gruber Career Development Associate Professor of Finance

Jared R. Curhan, PhD
Sloan Distinguished Associate Professor of Organization Studies

Vivek Farias, PhD
Robert N. Noyce Career Development Associate Professor of Operations Managment

Katherine Kellogg, PhD
Associate Professor of Organization Studies

Fiona E. Murray, PhD
David Sarnoff Associate Professor of Management of Technology
Associate Professor of Technological Innovation, Entrepreneurship, and Strategic Management
Faculty Director, Martin Trust Center for MIT Entrepreneurship
Associate Dean for Innovation, MIT Sloan School of Management

Cynthia Rudin, PhD
Associate Professor of Statistics

Tavneet Suri, PhD
Maurice F. Strong Career Development Associate Professor of Applied Economics

Catherine E. Tucker, PhD
Mark Hyman Jr. Career Development Associate Professor of Information Technology and Marketing

Rodrigo S. Verdi, PhD
Sarofim Family Career Development Associate Professor of Accounting

Juanjuan Zhang, PhD
Associate Professor of Marketing

Assistant Professors

Joshua M. Ackerman, PhD
Class of 1957 Career Development Assistant Professor of Marketing

Matthew Amengual, PhD
Assistant Professor of Management

Evan Apfelbaum, PhD
W. Maurice Young (1961) Career Development Assistant Professor of Management
Assistant Professor of Organization Studies

Itai Ashlagi, PhD
Assistant Professor of Operations Management

Jean-Noël Barrot, PhD
Assistant Professor of Finance

Alessandro Bonatti, PhD
Sarofim Family Career Development Assistant Professor of Applied Economics

Christian Catalini, PhD
Assistant Professor of Technological Innovation, Entrepreneurship, and Strategic Management

Albert F. Cavallo, PhD
Assistant Professor of Applied Economics

Gonzalo Cisternas, PhD
Assistant Professor of Applied Economics

Anna Costello, PhD
Assistant Professor of Accounting

Xavier Giroud, PhD
Assistant Professor of Finance

Renee Richardson Gosline, PhD
Zenon Zannetos (1955) Career Development Assistant Professor of Marketing

João Granja, PhD
Assistant Professor of Accounting

Rajkamal J. Iyer, PhD
Assistant Professor of Finance

Erin M. Johnson, PhD
Assistant Professor of Applied Economics

Aleksandra J. Kacperczyk, PhD
Alvin J. Siteman (1948) Career Development Assistant Professor of Entrepreneurship

Erik Loualiche, PhD
Assistant Professor of Finance

Andrey Malenko, PhD
Assistant Professor of Finance

Matthew T. Marx, PhD
Alvin J. Siteman (1948) Career Development Assistant Professor of Entrepreneurship

Konstantin W. Milbradt, PhD
Assistant Professor of Finance

Reining Petacchi, PhD
Assistant Professor of Accounting

Ofer Sharone, PhD
Mitsubishi Career Development Assistant Professor

Nemit Shroff, PhD
Assistant Professor of Accounting

Eric So, PhD
Assistant Professor of Accounting

Neil Thompson, PhD
Assistant Professor of Technological Innovation, Entrepreneurship, and Strategic Management

Catherine Turco, PhD
Assistant Professor of Organization Studies

Adrien Verdelhan, PhD
Douglas Drane Career Development Assistant Professor in Information Technology and Management
Assistant Professor of Finance

Juan Pablo Vielma, PhD
Assistant Professor of Operations

Tauhid Zaman, PhD
Assistant Professor of Operations Management

Karen Zheng, PhD
Assistant Professor of Operations Management

Haoxiang Zhu, PhD
Assistant Professor of Finance

Adjunct Professors

Mary P. Rowe, PhD
Adjunct Professor of Management

Zeynep Ton, DBA
Adjunct Associate Professor of Management

Senior Lecturers

Noubar Afeyan, PhD
John Akula, PhD, JD

Seth Alexander, BS
President, MIT Investment Management Company

Howard Anderson, MBA
Bill Porter (1967) Distinguished Senior Lecturer of Entrepreneurship

William Aulet, MS
Entrepreneur in Residence
Managing Director, Martin Trust Center for MIT Entrepreneurship

Patricia Bentley, PhD

Lori Breslow, PhD
Director, MIT Teaching and Learning Laboratory

Philip Budden, PhD
John F. Carrier, DS
Sharmila Chatterjee, PhD
Elaine Chen, MS
Phil Cooper, MS
Jonathan Fleming, MPA
Nathaniel Gregory, PhD
Joseph G. Hadzima, Jr., JD
Leigh Hafrey, PhD
Brian Halligan, MBA
Neal Hartman, ABD
William Neal Isaacs, DPhil
Ralph Katz, PhD
Scott Keating, DBA
Christine Kelly, PhD
Donald Kieffer, BA
Janice Klein, PhD
Mark Kritzman, MBA
Peter Kurzina, JD
Valentin Livada, PhD
Shari Loessberg, JD
Jeffrey Alan Meldman, PhD, JD
John Minahan, PhD
Chris Noe, PhD
Sinead O'Flanagan, MS
Athanasios Orphanides, PhD

John Parsons, PhD
Executive Director, Center for Energy and Environmental Policy Research

Robert Pozen, JSD
Douglas Ready, PhD
John M. Reilly, PhD
John Rockart, PhD
Gita Rao, MBA, PhD

Donald B. Rosenfield, PhD
Director, Leaders for Global Operations Program

Jose Santos, MSc
Anjali Sastry, PhD
Imran Sayeed, BA
Claus Otto Scharmer, PhD
Peter M. Senge, PhD
Jeffrey Shames, SM
Steven Spear, PhD
Craig Stephenson, PhD
Donald Sull, PhD
Henry Birdseye Weil, SM
Janet Wilkinson, MEd
Darcy Winslow, MS
Andrew Wolk, MBA

Lecturers

Kara Blackburn, MA
Tracey Brenner
Daena Giardella, MA
Terence Heagney, PhD
Virginia Healy-Tangney, MA
Thomas J. Hynes III, BS
Jason Jay, PhD
M. Jonathan Lehrich, MBA
Jeffrey Lee, PhD
Paul Mende, PhD
Roberta Pittore, MBA
Katherine Rae, MBA
Lou Shipley
Carl Stjernfeldt
Reed Sturtevant
Andy J. Yap, PhD
Andrey Zarur, PhD

Research Staff

Senior Research Scientist

Peter Weill, PhD
Chairman, Center for Information Systems Research

Principal Research Associates

Mark Klein, PhD
George Roth, PhD
Alexander Samarov, PhD

Principal Research Scientists

Andrew McAfee, DBA

Jeanne Ross, PhD
Director, Center for Information Systems Research

Michael D. Siegel, PhD
Barbara Wixom, PhD

Research Associates

Patrick Miguel de Boer, MS
Jose-Maria Fernandez, MBA
James P. Houghton, BS
Robert Laubacher, PhD
Deborah Soule, MBA
Chintan Vaishnav, PhD

Research Scientists

Peter Gloor, PhD
Josh Introne, PhD
Danica Mijovic-Prelec, PhD
Martin Mocker, PhD
Anne Quaadgras, PhD
Peter Reynolds, PhD
Anne Sartori, PhD
Jayakanth Srinivasan, PhD
George Westerman, PhD
Stephanie Woerner, PhD

Professors Emeriti

Thomas J. Allen, Jr., PhD
Howard W. Johnson Professor of Management, Emeritus

Lotte L. Bailyn, PhD
T. Wilson (1953) Professor of Management, Emerita

Jay W. Forrester, DEng
Professor of Management, Emeritus

Arnoldo C. Hax, PhD
Alfred P. Sloan Professor of Management, Emeritus

Gordon M. Kaufman, DBA
Morris A. Adelman Professor of Management, Emeritus

Donald R. Lessard, PhD
Epoch Foundation Professor of International Management, Emeritus
Professor of Engineering Systems, Emeritus

Robert B. McKersie, PhD
Professor of Management, Emeritus

William F. Pounds, PhD
Professor of Management, Emeritus

Edgar H. Schein, PhD
Society of Sloan Fellows Professor of Management, Emeritus

Richard L. Schmalensee, PhD
Howard W. Johnson Professor of Management, Emeritus

Michael S. Scott Morton, DBA
Jay W. Forrester Professor of Computer Science, Emeritus

Lester C. Thurow, PhD
Jerome and Dorothy Lemelson Professor of Management and Economics, Emeritus
Coordinator, Asia-Pacific Initiatives

Glen L. Urban, PhD
David Austin Professor of Management
Chairman, MIT Center for Digital Business

Ross L. Watts, PhD
Erwin H. Schell Professor of Management, Emeritus

 

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