Summer Session Catalog
Select a department by Course number:
 
Select a department by name:

2014 Summer Session

Calendar for the 2014 Summer Session

June 9 (Mon) – August 19 (Tue)
Ten-week Summer Term

July 4 (Fri)
Independence Day Holiday

August 18–19 (Mon–Tue)
Final Exam Period

Grades will become available on WebSIS on or about August 26.

During the regular Summer Session, MIT offers a limited selection of the subjects available in the academic year as well as a few subjects designed for special interests and needs of MIT students. This catalog describes those subjects and gives general information relevant to summer enrollment.

MIT students can take arranged-unit subjects (such as UROP, Special Studies, Research, Internship, Co-op, Independent Study, Thesis Preparation, or Thesis) during the Summer Session by prior arrangement with a faculty member.

See the section on Admission and Registration for more details.

The Institute reserves the right to make changes in the regulations and courses announced in this catalog.

MIT's nondiscrimination policy


summer@future

Building on the work of the Institute-wide Task Force on the Future of MIT Education, and in collaboration with the Office of Digital Learning, MIT will offer a small number of for-credit subjects that blend online learning and residential learning this coming summer on an experimental basis. These subjects are open only to current MIT students. To encourage participation for this first year, tuition for these subjects and on-campus housing will be fully subsidized for students registering for one or more subjects. Additional information about tution, housing and expenses relating to these subjects is available at http://future.mit.edu/summer-future.

 

Short Courses for Professionals

MIT Professional Education—Short Programs offers more than 40 courses in two-to-five day sessions in the summer. These intensive courses are designed to inform busy professionals through in-depth learning with long-term value. Courses combine MIT's breakthrough research with insights from industry, government, and academic participants. These courses sharpen participants' competitive edge as today's technologies, industries, and organizations undergo rapid change.

Short Programs attendees come from across the United States and around the world. About 25 percent are international; another 20 percent come from New England states. Most are mid-career technical, scientific, business, and government professionals in their 20s through 50s who seek new skills for the purposes of a promotion, career advancement, or professional standing.

In addition to receiving a certificate, Short Programs participants can earn Continuing Education Units (CEUs). Units for each course are specified on the course information page and are calculated based on learning contact hours.

For further information, view the Short Programs website at http://shortprograms.mit.edu/.

 

 MIT
Questions and Comments | Home Page