Summer Session Catalog
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summer@future

summerfuture@mit.edu

Building on the work of the Institute-wide Task Force on the Future of MIT Education, and in collaboration with the Office of Digital Learning, MIT will offer a small number of classes for credit in summer 2014 on an experimental basis. These subjects represent another step in the exploration of opportunities to enhance the residential learning experience with online educational materials and blended learning models.

Enrollment is restricted to regular MIT students.

Information on subsidized tuition and housing, as well as other expenses associated with these expermental subjects, is available here.

 

2.S03 Special Subject: Dynamics I (New)
Prereq: 2.086
U (Summer)
6 units (2-0-4)
Credit cannot also be received for 2.03.
Experimental version of 2.03, which offers a combination of online and in-person lectures. See description of 2.03 (below). Licensed for Summer 2014 by the Committee on Curricula as an acceptable alternative to 2.03.
Introduction to the dynamics of one and two degree-of-freedom mechanical systems. Kinematics. Force-momentum formulation for particles and rigid bodies. Work-energy concepts. Rotation of rigid bodies, angular momentum, torques and moments of inertia. Newton, Euler equations (direct method in dynamics). Conservation laws in dynamics. Basics of equilibrium, linearization and stability analysis. Includes computational modeling of dynamical systems with applications.
S. Mahajan

3.S01 Special Subject: Materials Selection and Design of Nanostructured Catalysts for Sustainable Energy
Prereq: Permission of instructor
9 units
Experimental project-based class in which students design materials for novel catalysts by accounting for the technical, economic, and environmental performance of the material(s) incorporated into the catalytic systems. Students work with a series of analytical and computational tools to inform materials design; laboratory sessions focus on synthesis and characterization of the proposed catalyst materials. Designed to help students develop an intuitive understanding of the materials design process. Includes combination of online and in-person lectures.
Limited to 15.
Schedule June 16-July 31, 2014
E. Olivetti, A. Kolpak, Y. Roman

6.443J Quantum Information ScienceSee 8.371J

7.S390 Special Subject in Biology: Creating Digital Learning Materials for Biology
U (Summer)
Prereq: Permission of instructor
6 units (P/D/F)
7.S930 Special Subject in Biology: Creating Digital Learning Materials for Biology
G (Summer)
Prereq: Permission of instructor
6 units (P/D/F)
This course is a student-driven, discovery-based iterative project with workshop-like lecture meetings. Students will use existing digital and traditional content to identify a scientific misconception, outline a lesson plan to address the misconception, apply the best teaching practices to implement the lesson plan, select the best medium (or one of the best) for translating that lesson plan into a digital format, present both the lesson and design plan to instructors for approval and feedback, implement an iterative design process including regular feedback from the instructors and peers on the design and redesigns, and evaluate other students' work through a system of peer review. Designed to improve students' scientific communication skills and provide experience in communicating through a digital format. Enrollment limited.
No required or recommended textbooks.
M.E. Wiltrout, N. Schafheimer, S. Thornton

7.S391 Special Subject: Quantitative Biology Workshop
U (Summer)
Prereq: Permission of instructor
3 units (P/D/F)
7.S931 Special Subject: Quantitative Biology Workshop
G (Summer)
Prereq: Permission of instructor
3 units (P/D/F)
In this course, students will use the online content and graded exercises on the MITx 7.QBW course site. Through this course, students will apply quantitative methods to biological problems, familiarize themselves with vocabulary of computation, write Python, MATLAB, and R code to analyze biological data, examine any protein structure in PyMOL, design and carry out genetic experiments through a simulation tool, and determine genetic characteristics and evaluate the results through a chi-squared test. Enrollment limited.
No required or recommended textbooks.
M.E. Wiltrout, N. Schafheimer, S. Thornton

8.371J Quantum Information Science
(Same subject as 18.436J, 6.443J)
G (Summer)
Prereq: 18.435J
12 units (3-0-9) H-Level Grad Credit
Examines quantum computation and quantum information. Topics include quantum circuits, quantum Fourier transform and search algorithms, the quantum operations formalism, quantum error correction, stabilizer and Calderbank-Shor-Steans codes, fault tolerant quantum computation, quantum data compression, entanglement, capacity of quantum channels, and proof of the security of quantum cryptography. Prior knowledge of quantum mechanics required.
MWF 10-11:30, Room 36-372
I. Chuang

18.436J Quantum Information ScienceSee 8.371J

 

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