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Participants Bios


 
 

Mohammad al-Asad is an architect and architectural historian, and the founding director of the Center for the Study of the Built Environment in Amman (www.csbe.org). He studied architecture at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and history of architecture at Harvard University. He held post-doctoral research positions at Harvard University and the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton. He also taught at the University of Jordan, Princeton University, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, where he was the Alan K. and Leonarda Laing Distinguished Visiting Professor. He has served as a reviewer for the Aga Khan Award for Architecture since 1989. He has published in both Arabic and English on the architecture of the Islamic world in edited books and in academic and professional journals. He is the author of Old Houses of Jordan: Amman 1920 – 1950 (Amman: TURAB, 1997), and co-author of The Umayyads: The Rise of Islamic Art (Brussels: Museum With No Frontiers, 2000). He contributes a weekly article on architecture and urbanism to Jordan 's English daily, The Jordan Times. Al-Asad is a member of the board of directors of the Royal Society of Fine Arts – The Jordan National Gallery of Fine Arts and of the Jordan National Museum. He also is the coordinator of the International Academic and Curatorial Committee of the Museum With No Frontiers Discover Islamic Arts project, which is developing a virtual web-based museum of Islamic art in the Mediterranean. He is a visiting associate professor at the Department of Architecture at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology for the Spring 2005 semester.

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Andrew Altman is President and Chief Executive Officer, Anacostia Waterfront Corporation, Washington, D.C. and Visiting Fellow, Brookings Institution, Washington D.C. He served for the past five years as the planning director for Washington D.C. under Mayor Anthony A. Williams, and was recently appointed the first President and Chief Executive Officer of the Anacostia Waterfront Corporation founded to guide the ambitious regeneration of the capital's waterfront. The initiative to reclaim the waterfront of Washington D.C. has been nationally recognized by the American Institute of Architects, the American Planning Association, Places Magazine (ERDA award) and the American Society of Landscape Architects as one of the most innovative urban redevelopment initiatives in the United States. Mr. Altman was also recently appointed a Visiting Fellow at the Brookings Institution Center for Metropolitan Policy where he will be working on the development of a new “Transformative Agenda for Cities” as well as international initiatives on urban development, including a Brookings initiative in China, collaborations in the United Kingdom and participation in the Urban Age forums on the state of world cities organized by the London School of Economics. As a Lady David Fellow in Israel, Mr. Altman worked for two years at the Jerusalem Institute on Israel Studies with Professor Shlomo Hasson on the “Minhalot Project” evaluating a neighborhood empowerment program in Jerusalem established by former mayor Teddy Kollek. Mr. Altman has held an appointment as a visiting lecturer at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and holds a Masters in City Planning from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

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Gannit Ankori's latest book, Palestinian Art, is in press and scheduled for publication by Reaktion Books (London) in October 2005. It is a ground-breaking volume based on years of painstaking research, documentation of primary visual and textual sources, and numerous interviews with Palestinian artists who live in the occupied territories, within the ‘green line' and in exile. Ankori's first two books were devoted to the Mexican artist Frida Kahlo. Her latest article on Kahlo is forthcoming in a comprehensive catalogue, to be published by Tate Modern in conjunction with their upcoming Kahlo retrospective. Ankori has also published extensively on the visual representation of gender-related issues; the construction of identity; and on artistic articulations of exile, trauma and hybridity. Her articles have appeared in numerous journals, catalogues and anthologies, in English, Hebrew, Arabic, German and French. Ankori is on a leave of absence from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, where she is Associate Professor at the department of Art History. She currently holds a Visiting Scholar position at Harvard University 's Department of the History Art and Architecture and is Visiting Associate Professor at Tufts University 's School of the Museum of Fine Arts. She has been appointed Research Associate and Visiting Faculty at Harvard Divinity School 's Women's Studies in Religion Program for the academic year 2005-2006.

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Arjun Appadurai serves as Provost and Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs at New School University in New York City, where he also holds a Distinguished Professorship as the John Dewey Professor in the Social Sciences. Until recently, Arjun Appadurai was the William K. Lanman Jr. Professor of International Studies, a Professor of Anthropology, and Director of the Center on Cities and Globalization at Yale University. He is one of the founding editors, along with Carol A. Breckenridge, of the journal Public Culture and was the founding Director of the Chicago Humanities Institute at the University of Chicago (1992-1998), during which time he held the Richard J. and Barbara E. Franke Professorship. Appadurai is one of the founders of the Interdisciplinary Network on Globalization, a consortium of institutions in various parts of the world devoted to the study of global politics and culture. He is the founder and now the President of PUKAR (Partners for Urban Knowledge Action and Research), a non-profit group of practically-oriented researchers concerned with urban global issues, centered on the city of Mumbai (India). He served or has served on numerous national and international advisory bodies, including the advisory council of the Smithsonian Institute, and the governing boards of: the Center for Arts and Culture (Washington, DC), the Institute for Cultural Pluralism (Rio de Janeiro), the Research Center for Religion and Society (Amsterdam), Amsterdam School for Social Science Research, and the Social Science Research Council (New York). He has served as a consultant or advisor to a wide range of public and private organizations, including many major foundations (Ford, MacArthur, and Rockefeller); UNESCO; UNDP; WIDER (World Institute for Development Economics Research); the World Bank; the National Endowment for the Humanities; and the National Science Foundation. His current research has three foci: ethnic violence in the context of globalization, with a special focus on ethnic relations in Mumbai in the late 1980's and 1990's; a longer term collaborative project on the cultural dimensions of social crisis in Mumbai, focusing on housing, poverty, media and violence; a comparative ethnographic project on grass-roots globalization, intended to illuminate emergent transnational organizational forms and new practices of sovereignty.

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Arie Arnon heads the newly created "Program on Economics and Society" at the Van Leer Jerusalem Institute and has been teaching since 1983 at the Department of Economics, Ben Gurion University. His areas of research include macroeconomics, monetary theory, the Israeli labor market and the history of economic thought. A major focus in recent years has been the political economy of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. Since 2002 Arnon has been the coordinator of the Israeli team in the Aix Group, where experts from the Palestinian Authority, Israel and the international community meet to discuss various economic aspects of the current economic conditions, as well as the possibilities for economic cooperation when a permanent peace agreement is reached. A report entitled "Economic Road Map" was published by the group in January 2004. Arnon was a visiting scholar and teacher at Berkeley, Stanford, Penn, The New School University and SOAS. He was Senior Economist in the Research Department of the Bank of Israel from 1989 to 1997, and Chair of the Department of Economics at BGU from 1999 to 2001. He served as a member of the "Committee on Economic Affairs Concerning the Negotiations with the Palestinians" (the Ben-Shahar Committee) in 1993, a consultant to the World Bank in 1996, and a member of the "Committee on Minimum Wages" in 2000. In 1998-2004 he was a co-chair of an Israeli NGO entitled "Commitment to Peace and Social Justice".

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Ariella Azoulay is a Senior Lecturer, The Program for Cultural Studies at Bar Ilan University where she teaches visual culture and contemporary philosophy at the Program for Culture and Interpretation. She is the author of Once Upon A Time: Photography following Walter Benjamin (Bar Ilan University Press, 2005, in Hebrew), Deaths Showcase (MIT Press, 2001 Winner of The Affinity Award, ICP) and Training for ART (Hakibutz Hameuchad and The Porter Institute Publishers, 2000, in Hebrew) and the director of documentary films, I Also Dwell Among Your Own People: Conversations with Azmi Bishara (2004), The Chain Food (2004),  The Angel of History (2000) and A Sign from Heaven (1999).

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Naseer H. Aruri is Chancellor Professor (Emeritus) of Political Science at the University of Massachusetts Dartmouth. His many publications include Occupation: Israel Over Palestine (1983), The Obstruction of Peace: The U.S., Israel and the Palestinians (1995), Palestinian Refugees: The Right of Return (Pluto, 2001), and   Dishonest Broker: The US Role in Israel and Palestine (South End Press, 2003). Spanish, Italian and Arabic editions of this book will appear in 2005. Professor Aruri was a member of the Board of Directors of Human Rights Watch/Middle East, 1990-1992, and a three-term member of the Board of Directors of Amnesty International, USA, 1984-1990.

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Meron Benvenisti is an historian and Former Deputy Mayor of Jerusalem. He is the author of books on Jerusalem, the Israeli-Arab conflict, cemeteries and the Crusader Period of Palestine. In the 1980's he initiated the West Bank Data Project, a research project that for the first time recorded and analyzed the conditions in the occupied territories and established a basis for future studies. In 2002 he initiated and directed the “Morning After” project which studied the Israeli body politic and civil society in the era of Peace. He is currently editing for publication (University of California Press) an autobiographical book.

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Julian Beinart is a Professor of Architecture at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. His teaching and research is about the form and design of cities. He has been a Sir Herbert Baker Rome Scholar, Program Chairman and President of the International Design Conference in Aspen, one of the founders of the Laboratory for Architecture and Urban Design in Italy, American editor of Space and Society/Spazio e Societa, a Fellow of the Western Behavioral Sciences Institute in California, and research director of a Mellon Foundation study of architectural education in the USA. In the 1960s, he produced jazz concerts and directed design courses in five African countries as part of a wider study of popular art exhibited at the ICA in London and the subject of a short BBC film. His research has been sponsored by the Carnegie, Oppenheimer and Farfield Foundations, as well as by the National Endowment for the Arts. His work and writing have been published widely and he has lectured in Europe, the USA, the Middle East, Asia and Africa. Recently he has participated in conferences on the 600th anniversary of Seoul, the Prince of Wales Forum in Los Angeles, the Euro-Disney conference in Paris, the new capitals conference in Taipei, the 50th anniversary of Chandigarh, and has been a member of the Habitat Advisory Panel. In 1992 and 1994, he was co-chairman of the first two Jerusalem Seminars in Architecture, published by Rizzoli.

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M. Christine Boyer is the William R. Kenan, Jr. Professor of Architecture and Urbanism at the Princeton University. She is an urban historian whose interests include the history of the American city, city planning, preservation planning, and computer science. Before coming to the School, Boyer was professor and chair of the City and Regional Planning Program at Pratt Institute. She has written extensively about American urbanism. Her publications include Dreaming the Rational City: The Myth of American City Planning 1890-1945 (Cambridge: The MIT Press, 1983), Manhattan Manners: Architecture and Style 1850-1900 (New York: Rizzoli, 1985), The City of Collective Memory (Cambridge: The MIT Press, 1994), and CyberCities (New York: Princeton Architectural Press, 1996). She has also written "La Mission Héliographique: Architectural Photography, Collective Memory and the Patrimony of France, 1851" in Joan M. Swartz and James R. Ryan (eds.) Picturing Place, Photography and the Geographical Imagination (New York: I.B. Taurus, 2003); “Memories of Contention: the Sacred Stones of Jerusalem,” in Michael Sorkin (ed.) The Next Jerusalem (New York: Monacelli Press, 2002); “Approaching the Memory of Shanghai: the case of Zhang Yimou and Shanghai Triad ” in Mario Gandelsonas (ed.) Shanghai Reflections: Architecture, Urbanism, and the Search for an Alternative Modernity (New York: Princeton Architectural Press, 2002); “Meditations on a Wounded Skyline and Its Stratigraphies of Pain,” in Michael Sorkin and Sharon Zukin (eds.) After the World Trade Center: Rethinking New York (New York: Routledge, 2002); “Chasing the Arrow of Time: Cities, Cinema and Motion” in Fast Forward, a driving perception (International Design Seminar, TU Deflt, 2003); and “Cognitive Landscapes,” in Catherine Spellman (ed.) Landscape/Architecture (Barcelona: Actar, 2003).

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Naomi Carmon is a Professor at the Faculty of Architecture and Town Planning and head of the Center for Urban and Regional Studies in the Technion - Israel Institute of Technology. She is an urban planner and a sociologist, a teacher and a researcher, who gained her degrees in the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, the Technion in Haifa and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. She has written books (in English and Hebrew) and more than a hundred articles and chapters on issues of planning and evaluation of urban and regional plans, with an emphasis on housing and urban regeneration, and on quality of life of minorities and immigrants. She has served as a consultant to national and local development projects, as a public representative in governmental and municipal bodies, and as a volunteer in not-for-profit community organizations. She has served as a visiting professor and scholar and a visiting lecturer in universities in the US, Canada, Great Britain, Sweden, Holland, Russia, Poland, Philippines and Brazil.

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James Carroll received his BA and MA degrees from St. Paul 's College, the Paulist Fathers' seminary in Washington, DC.  He was ordained to the priesthood in 1969 and served as Catholic Chaplain at Boston University from 1969 to 1974.  During that time, he published numerous books on religious subjects and had  a weekly column in the National Catholic Reporter.  He later left to become a writer and has published nine novels.  His memoir An American Requiem: God, My Father, and the War That Came Between Us won the 1996 National Book Award in Nonfiction. Carroll has lectured widely, notably delivering the Lowell Lecture at Harvard University, the Lowell Lecture at Boston College, the Frost Fellowship Lecture at Amherst College, and the Burke Lecture at the University of California at Sand Diego.  He has been a Shorenstein Fellow at the Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University, and a Fellow at the Center for the Study of Values in Public Life at the Harvard Divinity School, where he remains a Research Associate.  He is a member of the Advisory Board of the International Center for Ethics, Justice, and Public Life at Brandeis University.  His best-selling book Constantine 's Sword: The Church and the Jews, a history of anti-Semitism from Jesus to the Holocaust, was published in January, 2001.

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Manuel Castells is Professor of Investigation in the Universitat Oberta de Catalunya (UOC) and Director of the Catalunya Internet Project (PIC), Emeritus Professor of Sociology and Urban and Regional Planning of the University of California, Berkeley, and Distinguished Visiting Professor of Technology and Society at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. In 1994-98 he served as Chair of UC Berkeley's Center for Western European Studies. Between 1967 and 1979 he taught sociology at the University of Paris, first at the Nanterre Campus, then, since 1970, at the Ecole des Hautes Etudes en Sciences Sociales. He has also been professor and director of the Institute for Sociology of New Technologies, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Research Profesor at the Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas in Barcelona, and a visiting professor at 15 universities in Europe, the United States, Canada, Asia, and Latin America. He has lectured at about 300 academic and professional institutions in 40 countries. He has been an adviser to Unesco, International Labour Office, United Nations Development Program, US Agency for International Development, European Commission, Government of Chile (Allende administration), Government of Mexico, Government of France, Government of Ecuador, State Council of the People's Republic of China, Government of the Russian Federation, Government of Brazil, Government of Portugal, and Government of Spain. Professor Castells has published 20 books, and over 100 articles in academic journals,as well as co-authored or edited 15 additional books. Among his various distinctions and awards, he was appointed to the European Academy in 1994; and was a member of the European Commission's High Level Expert Group on the Information Society in 1995-97. In 1999-2000 he received the May 1st Award for Social Thought from the Catalan Workers General Union's Foundation, and the Cambrescat Award for Internet Studies from the Catalan Association of Chambers of Commerce.

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Naomi Chazan now heads the School of Society and Politics at the Academic College of Tel-Aviv-Yaffo after completing a year as the first Robert Wilhelm Fellow at the Center for International Studies at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.  Professor Chazan served three terms in the Knesset (1992-2003), where she was Deputy Speaker and a member, among others, of the Foreign Affairs and Defense Committee.  A professor of political science (emerita) at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, where she chaired the Harry S Truman Research Institute for the Advancement of Peace, Naomi Chazan has written extensively on comparative politics, African politics, the Arab-Israel conflict, and women and peace.  She is among the founders of several peace and reconciliation movements in Israel, has been involved in the Geneva initiative, and is active in a variety of peace, human rights, and women's organizations.

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Arza Churchman is the Dean of the Technion Faculty of Architecture and Town Planning, and holds the Karplus Chair in Architecture and Environmental Design. Professor Churchman is a world-renowned pioneer in environmental psychology, and was the editor of the recent Handbook of Environmental Psychology. Her research interests include housing, density and its planning implications; the environmental needs of women, children, elderly; and public participation in planning. She has conducted extensive research in these areas, been a consultant on Israeli national and municipal government projects, and on the board of many NGOs and international organizations. She is a member of the Israel National Council for Planning and Building. She has been a visiting professor at universities from Irvine, California, to Sydney, Australia, and has given keynote addresses at environmental psychology conferences from New York to Shanghai to Dubrovnik, Croatia. For her contributions to teaching, science, and humanity, Prof Churchman received the 2001 Career Achievement Award of the Environmental Design Research Association, the first non-North American to receive this award.

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Diane Davis, Project Coordinator Jerusalem 2050, Ph.D. in Political Sociology, Professor of Urban Studies and Planning, and Associate Dean, School of Architecture and Planning. Research and teaching interests include the politics of urban policy, cities in conflict, the relationship between cities and national development, and the political conflicts among competing territorial jurisdictions in expanding metropolitan areas in the developing world. Recent research, supported by both the MacArthur Foundation and the Carnegie Corporation, examines the relationship between police impunity, deteriorating rule of law, and changing patterns and priorities of urban governance in countries undergoing democratic transition. Her current research, undertaken with Prof. Jo Beall of the Institute for Development Studies at the London School of Economics, is a comparative study of the urban development and local policy challenges facing cities wracked by violence and conflict. Book publications include: Discipline and Development: Middle Classes and Prosperity in East Asia and Latin America (Cambridge University Press, 2004); Irregular Armed Forces and Their Role in Policies and State Formation, co-edited with Anthony Pereira (Cambridge University Press, 2003); and Urban Leviathan: Mexico City in the Twentieth Century (Temple University Press, 1994). She has been editor of the research annual Political Power and Social Theory (Elsevier Ltd.) for the past 15 years.

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John de Monchaux is a Professor of Architecture and Planning at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Master of Architecture. Director, SPURS Program. Former Dean, School of Architecture and Planning, 1981 to 1992. Prior to 1981, Professor de Monchaux was principal planner with Kinhill Pty. Ltd., a planning, design, and engineering firm in Australia. Previously he was a principal in the Llewelyn-Davies firms of architects and planners in the United Kingdom and in the United States. He was responsible for projects in Australia, Southeast Asia, the United Kingdom, Colombia, Canada, and the United States, including a major program for slum upgrading and new sites and services housing in the Philippines. He was Founding Chairman of the Boston Civic Design Commission until 1992. From 1992 to 1996, he was the General Manager (part-time) of the Aga Khan Trust for Culture, a foundation based in Geneva concerned with the quality of architecture and the built environment in the Muslim world. Interested in city design and in implementation strategies for design policies and plans. He was also co-director of the 1998 Boston Conference, a major public examination of the future of the Boston Harbor. Most recently he co-edited, with J. Mark Schuster, Preserving the Built Heritage: Tools for Implementation (Salzburg Seminar, University Press of New England, 1997).

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Leila Farsakh is an Assistant Professor of political science at University of Massachusetts in Boston and a Research Affiliate at the Center for International Studies at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. She holds a PhD in political economy from the University of London (2002), and an MPhil from the University of Cambridge in the UK (1990). She has worked with a number of international organizations, including the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) in Paris (1993-1996) and the Palestine Economic Policy Research Institute in Ramallah (1998-1999). Between 2003-2004 she undertook post-doctoral research at the Center for Middle Eastern Studies at Harvard University. She has published various articles and studies on issues related to the Palestinian economy and the Oslo Process, international migration and regional integration. Her forthcoming book, Labor, Land and Occupation: The Political Economy of Palestinian Labor Migration to Israel, 1967-2004, published by Routledge Curzon Press, UK is expected in August 2005. In 2001, she won the Peace and Justice Award from the Cambridge Peace Commission, in Cambridge, Massachusetts.

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Tali Hatuka is an architect, urban designer and Research Fellow in MIT's Department of Urban Studies and Planning. Hatuka works primarily on social and architectural issues, and on the relationships between urban form, violence, everyday life and modern society. Her awards for research include the European Community Marie Curie Fellowship (2005-2008) and a Fulbright Postdoctoral Fellowship (2004-2005). Hatuka is co-editor of Architectural Culture: Place, Representation, Body (2005 [Hebrew]) and the author of the Hebrew edition of her book, entitled Revisionist Moments: Violent Acts and Urban Space in Contemporary Tel Aviv (forthcoming). She also has been published in a wide range of journals including the Journal of Urban Design International, Journal of Architecture and Planning Research, and Planning Perspectives. Currently, she is writing a book entitled Architecture and Civil Participation as part of a large project and exhibition funded by the European Community. She received her PhD from the Faculty of Architecture and Town Planning at the Technion, Haifa, in 2005.

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Huda Farid Imam is Palestinian, and was born and lives in Jerusalem. Her present post is Managing Director of the Centre for Jerusalem Studies at Al-Quds University. Educated in Jerusalem, Paris and in 1997 acquired her MBA from the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE). Her working experience mainly involved human resource development: in the 80s served as Personnel Officer with UNDP and after the Madrid Peace Conference in 91, as a Training Officer at the Technical and Advisory Committees, (the Palestinian Team to the Peace Conference) at the Orient House in Jerusalem. Ms. Imam believes in non-violent resistance and her manner of resistance lies in her contribution to develop education, culture and social justice values amongst the Palestinian Arab citizens of Jerusalem, with special focus on youth and women empowerment. She is a board member of a number of Palestinian institutions, namely: The Jerusalem Link (Bat Shalom & Jerusalem Centre for Women); The Peoples' Campaign for Peace & Democracy – HASHD; Which supports a two state solution based on the Destination Map (Nusseibeh-Ayalon Initiative); Al-Ma'mal Foundation for Contemporary Art; The Palestine Consultancy Group (PCG); Internews: (Palestinian Radio Training), and the Institute of Jerusalem Studies, affiliate of the Institute of Palestine Studies.

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Menachem Klein is a Senior Lecturer in the Department of Political Science at Bar-Ilan University, and a Senior Research fellow at the Jerusalem Institute for Israel Studies. Dr. Klein studied Middle East and Islamic Studies at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem and in 1992-3 and 2001-2 was a fellow at St. Antony's College, Oxford University. Dr. Klein is a Board Member of B'etselem, The Israeli Information Center for Human Rights in the Occupied Territories. In 2000 Dr. Klein was an external expert adviser for Jerusalem Affairs and Israel -PLO Final Status Talks to the Minister of Interior Security and Minister of Foreign Affairs, Prof. S. Ben-Ami. He also was a member of the political advisory team operating in the office of Prime Minister Ehud Barak. Since 1996 he is active in many unofficial negotiations with Palestinian counterparts. In October 2003 Dr. Klein signed together with prominent Israeli and Palestinian negotiators the Geneva Agreement – a detailed proposal for a comprehensive Israeli-Palestinian peace accord. His main fields of research are: The PLO's policy and ideology; Jerusalem as a frontier city; and the ambivalent relationship between intellectuals and politicians. Jerusalem: The Contested City was published in 2001 by C. Hurst (London) and NYU (New York) 2001; and The Jerusalem Problem: The Struggle for Permanent Status is forthcoming by the University Press of Florida, 2003.

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Yosef Jabareen has a Ph.D. in Urban Planning from the Faculty of Architecture and Town Planning at Technion; Masters in Design Studies at Graduate School of Design, Harvard University ; Krietman Fellow at Ben Gurion University ; and Rothschild Fellow. Received the Tami Steinmetz Award for Peace Research at Tel Aviv University. At the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, where he is a Lecturer, his research focuses on efforts to create space of trust among different ethnic communities.

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Nora Libertun Duren is a PhD Student in the International Development and Regional Planning group at Department of Urban Studies and Planning at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. She holds a Master of Architecture in Urban Design from Harvard University Graduate School of Design, and a Master of Advanced Architecture and Architecture degree from the University of Buenos Aires. Among other prizes, she has been awarded the Fulbright Fellowship, the Harvard Fortabat Fellowship, the MIT Homer Burnell Presidential Fellowship, and the University of Buenos Aires School of Architecture Gold Medal. She has taught at Harvard University School of Design and at the University of Buenos Aires, and has professional work experience in designing urban and architectural projects for Buenos Aires, Mexico, New York, London, Vienna, Beijing, and Doha.

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Everett Mendelsohn is Professor of the History of Science at Harvard University, where he has been on the faculty since 1960. He has worked extensively on the history of the life sciences as well as on aspects of the social and sociological history of science and the relations of science and modern societies. He is the founder and former editor of the Journal of the History of Biology and a founder of the yearbook Sociology of the Sciences. He serves(d) on the editorial boards of the Journal of Medicine and Philosophy, Social Science and Medicine, Social Epistemology, Social Studies of Science, and Fundamenta Scientiae, among others. He is past president of the International Council for Science Policy Studies and has been deeply involved in the relations between science and modern war as a founder of the American Association for the Advancement of Science's Committee on Science, Arms Control, and National Security, and the American Academy of Arts and Science's Committee on International Security Studies. He was a founder and first president of the Cambridge based Institute for Peace and International Security. He was awarded the Gregor Mendel Medal of the reorganized Czechoslovak Academy of Science in 1991. During 1994 he held the Olaf Palme Professorship in Sweden. He received recognition for his teaching when awarded the Phi Beta Kappa Teaching Prize in 1996.

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Rami Nasrallah is the Head of International Peace and Cooperation Center. He studied at Hebrew University, where he received a master's degree in Political Science and Middle Eastern Studies. He is a Ph.D. candidate in planning policies at Delft University of Technology in the Netherlands. Between 1993-1996 he was a political advisor and Israel Desk Officer at Orient House in Jerusalem. From 1996 to 1998, he was director of the Orient House Special Unit, where he coordinated a core team of experts. Their main task was to prepare for the final status negotiations on Jerusalem issues. In addition to his role at IPCC, Mr. Nasrallah is a Research Associate on the Cities in Conflict Project in the Architecture Faculty of Cambridge University. His research has appeared in Divided Cities in Transition, The Jerusalem Urban Fabric, and Jerusalem on the Map. His recent research has focused on “Images of the other” and increasing citizen participation in democracies. Prior to 1993, he was active as a journalist.

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Alona Nitzan-Shiftan is a senior lecturer at the Faculty of Architecture and Town Planning at the Technion. She studies the politics of architecture, particularly in Israel and the US, and focuses her research on post-WW II architectural culture in cross-cultural contexts and in light of recent thought in the fields of nationalism, Orientalism, postcolonialism and globalization. She holds a Ph.D. and an S.M.Arch.S from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, a B.Arch cum laude from the Technion, and was recently the Mary Davis and the Kress Postdoctoral Fellow at the Center for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts (CASVA) at the National Gallery. Her publications have appeared in Architectural History, Theory and Criticism, Cities, Harvard Design Magazine, Jama'a, and Thresholds, as well as in edited volumes such as The End of Tradition. She is currently working on a manuscript tentatively titled Becoming NATIONAL through ARCHITECTURE: The Post-'67 Israelization of Jerusalem, and a book on I.M. Pei's East Building, the subject of an exhibition she co-curated at the National Gallery.

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Sari Nusseibeh, a Palestinian professor of philosophy at Al-Quds University, the Arab University of Jerusalem, was appointed president of the school in 1995. In the past few years, Al-Quds has grown to include the university's first medical and health sciences complex, in addition to a wide range of social-oriented academic programs and centers. He is considering, within the sphere of human affairs, the moral and functional limitations of the use of force/violence as a means to achieve or oppose political objectives. Nusseibeh has long been an advocate of peace negotiations between Israel and the Palestinians. In 2003, he co-launched The Peoples Voice, a nonpartisan civil initiative to mobilize grassroots support for a two-state solution, with former Israeli security Shin Bet chief Ami Ayalon. Nusseibeh received his bachelors and masters degrees in politics, philosophy, and economics from Oxford University and his doctoral degree in Islamic philosophy from Harvard University. From 1978 through 1990, he taught philosophy and cultural studies at Birzeit University in the West Bank. He has lectured widely in Europe and the United States and has received many prizes and awards for his work, including, most recently, the Premi Internacional Catalunya Award, which honors a person who has made contributions to the development of cultural, scientific, or human values around the world.

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Nasser Rabbat (B Arch, M Arch, Ph.D) is the Aga Khan Professor of Islamic Architecture at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, where he has taught since 1991. His scholarly interests include the history and historiography of Islamic art and architecture, urban history, and post-colonial criticism. He published The Citadel of Cairo: A New Interpretation of Royal Mamluk Architecture, (Leiden, 1995), Thaqafat al BinaÕ wa BinaÕ al-Thaqafa (The Culture of Building and Building Culture) (Beirut, 2002), and Al-Maqrizi: The Keeper of Egypt's History (Forthcoming, 2005). He was a co-author of Interpreting the Self: Autobiography in the Arabic Literary Tradition, ed. D. Reynolds (Berkeley, 2001). He is currently working on a number of books. First is a collection of essays, L'art Islamique ˆ la recherche d'une methode historique, which he originally delivered as lectures at the Institut du monde arabe (IMA) in Paris in January and February 2002. Second is an edited book of essays on the courtyard house. Third is a book of collected essays co-edited with Irene Bierman and Nezar AlSayyad, to be published by Lexington Press in 2005 under the title A Medieval Cairo for A Modern World. Rabbat regularly contributes to a number of Arabic newspapers and journals on art, architectural, and cultural issues. He serves on the boards of various organizations concerned with Islamic cultures, lectures extensively in the US and abroad, and maintains several websites focused on Islamic Architecture.

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Uri Ram is a Senior Lecturer at the Department of Behavioral Sciences at Ben Gurion University. He is the author, editor and co-editor of eight books, as well as numerous scholarly articles about Israeli society, nationalism, politics, culture, intellectuals and globalization. Dr. Ram's work has been published in Hebrew, English, German, French and Arabic. Publications (selected): Due 2006. The Globalization of Israel: McWorld in Tel Aviv, Jihad in Jerusalem. New York: Routledge.. 2005. The Globalization of Israel: McWorld in Tel Aviv, Jihad in Jerusalem. Tel Aviv: Resling Books (in Hebrew). Forthcoming is Zionism and Post-zionism: History, Sociology and Nationalism in Israel.

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Yusuf Said Natsheh from Al-Quds University got his PhD in 1997 from the University of London, School of Oriental and African Studies and his M.A & B.A from Cairo University. Dr. Natsheh is a member in the councils of many local Palestinian Societies interested in architectural Heritage and consultant for the Welfare Association for the “Revitalization of the Old City of Jerusalem”. He has written books and more than 40 articles about Jerusalem architectural heritage; the most important is the architectural survey of Ottoman architecture which was published in Ottoman Jerusalem the Living City. ed. by R. Hillenbrand and S Auld. London 2000. He also supervised the restoration project of the Mamluk monuments in and around al-Haram al-Sharif in the Old City of Jerusalem and was the focal Palestinian expert for the UNESCO mission in Feb-March 2004.

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Bishwapriya Sanyal is Ford International Professor of Urban Development and Planning and Director, Special Program in Urban and Regional Studies, Department of Urban Studies & Planning, Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Sanyal is former Vice-President of the American Planning Association, International Division. He trained as an Architect Planner with a doctorate from University of California at Los Angeles. Prof. Sanyal has also advised bilateral and multi-national donors including the Ford Foundation, World Bank, International Labour Organization, United Nations Center for Human Settlements, United Nations Development Program, and the United States Agency for International Development. He has conducted research in India, Bangladesh, Zambia, Kenya, Jordan, Lebanon, Brazil, and Curaçao. Most recent publications include: The Profession of City Planning: Changes, Successes, Failures and Challenges (1900-2000) (co-edited with L. Rodwin), Rutgers University Press; High Technology and Low-Income Communities: Prospects for the Positive Use of Advanced Information Technology (edited with W. Mitchell and D. Schön), MIT Press, 1998, and the forthcoming Comparative Planning Cultures, Routledge, May 2005.

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Richard J. Samuels is Ford International Professor of Political Science at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, where he is Director of the Center for International Studies.  He is also the Founding Director of the MIT Japan Program. Dr. Samuels most recent book, Machiavelli's Children: Leaders and Their Legacies in Italy and Japan (Cornell University Press, 2003), won the Marraro Prize from the Society for Italian Historical Studies and the Jervis-Schroeder Prize for International and Historical Studies from the American Political Science Association.  His 1994 study, Rich Nation, Strong Army: National Security and the Technological Transformation of Japan (Cornell University Press), won the John Whitney Hall Prize of the Association of Asian Studies and the 1996 Arisawa Memorial Prize of the Association of American University Presses.  His book, The Business of the Japanese State: Energy Markets in Comparative and Historical Perspective (Cornell University Press) received the Masayoshi Ohira Memorial Prize in 1988.  In 1983, Princeton University Press published his Politics of Regional Policy in Japan. Dr. Samuels' articles have appeared in International Organization, Foreign Affairs, International Security, The Journal of Modern Italian Studies, The Journal of Japanese Studies, Daedalus, and other scholarly journals.  He received his PhD from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Political Science in 1980. 

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Adèle Naudé Santos is the Dean of the School of Architecture and Planning at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. She has taught at numerous universities throughout the United States and the world, including Italy and in her native South Africa. Her interdisciplinary courses in urban design encourage architecture, landscape, and urban design students to collaborate and address unsolved problems in the urban environment. In addition to her academic work, she is principal architect in the San Francisco-based firm, Santos Prescott and Associates. Her architectural and planning projects include affordable and luxury housing and institutional buildings in Africa, Japan, and numerous US cities. She has received numerous awards and honors including being named Fellow of the American Institute of Architects in 1996.

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Daniel Seidemann is the founder and legal counsel for "Ir Amim", a non-profit association dedicated to an equitable, stable and sustainable Jerusalem, has been a practicing attorney in Jerusalem and a partner in a firm specializing in commercial law since 1987. Since 1991, he has also specialized in legal and public issues in East Jerusalem, in particular, with regard to government and municipal policies and practices, representing Israeli and Palestinian residents of Jerusalem before the statutory Planning Boards regarding development issues. Key cases have included: the takeover of properties in Silwan, the legality of the Har Homa expropriation and town plan, the Ras el Amud town plan, and administrative demolition orders. In 2001, he successfully filed suit to the Israel Supreme Court, requiring the Jerusalem Municipality and the Israeli Ministry of Education to provide adequate educational facilities and services to the Palestinian residents of East Jerusalem. From 1994 to 2000, Mr. Seidemann served as lead counsel of Ir Shalem, an NGO dedicated to the development of Jerusalem for the benefit of all of its residents, Israeli and Palestinian. In 2000-2001, Seidemann served in an informal advisory capacity to the final status negotiations; serving as a member of a committee of experts commissioned by the Prime Minister Barak's office to generate sustainable arrangements geared to implement the emerging political understandings with the Palestinians. Mr. Seidemann is a native of Syracuse, NY, and a graduate of Cornell University, emigrating to Israel in 1973, where he has lived since. From 1973-77 he was involved with educational work with youth leaders in Israel. He is a retired Reserve Major in the Israeli Defense Forces, who engaged in leadership training of senior officers. Mr. Seidemann is a member of the Israeli Bar Association, receiving his degree in Law from the Hebrew University in Jerusalem.

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Richard Sennett is a Professor of Sociology at the London School of Economics and Political Science. He specializes in research on cities, labour, and the sociology of culture. Professor Sennett chairs the Cities Programme, an inter-disciplinary teaching and research programme joining urban visual design to the social sciences. His publications include The Corrosion of Character (1998), Flesh and Stone (1994), and The Conscience of the Eye (1990).  He received the Helen and Robert Lynd life-time achievement award in sociology from the American Sociological Association in 2004. He is a Fellow at European Academy of Arts and Sciences; American Academy of Arts and Sciences; and Royal Society of Literature.

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Alice Shalvi was born in Germany and educated in England, where she graduated from Cambridge University in English Literature and from the London School of Economics in Social Work. She emigrated to Israel in 1949 and has ever since lived in Jerusalem. From 1950 to 1990 she taught in the English Department of the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, specialising in Shakespeare, whose “problem plays” were the topic of her doctoral dissertation. From 1975 to 1990 she served in a voluntary capacity as principal of Pelech Religious Experimental School for Girls and from 1984 to 2001 she was the founding chairwoman of the Israel Women's Network, a feminist advocacy organisation. In 1997 she was lured from retirement to become the rector and later the president of the Schechter Institute of Jewish Studies, a graduate school from which she retired in 2002.

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Michael Sorkin is the principal of the Michael Sorkin Studio in New York City, a design practice devoted to both practical and theoretical projects at all scales with a special interest in the city. Recent projects include master planning in Penang, Malaysia, Hamburg, Visselhoevede, Leipzig and Schwerin, Germany, planning for a Palestinian capital in East Jerusalem, urban design in Leeds, England, campus planning at the University of Chicago and CCNY, studies of the Manhattan and Brooklyn waterfronts and housing design in Far Rockaway, Vienna, and Miami, and a large park in Queens Plaza. The studio is the recipient of a variety of awards, including three I.D. Awards and a Progressive Architecture Award. Sorkin is the Director of the Graduate Urban Design Program at the City College of New York. From 1993 to 2000 he was Professor of Urbanism and Director of the Institute of Urbanism at the Academy of Fine Arts in Vienna. Sorkin lectures widely and is the author of many articles in a wide range of both professional and general publications and is currently contributing editor at Architectural Record and Metropolis. For ten years, he was the architecture critic of The Village Voice. His books include Variations on A Theme Park, Exquisite Corpse, Local Code, Giving Ground (edited with Joan Copjec, Wiggle (a monograph of the studio's work), Some Assembly Required, Other Plans, The Next Jerusalem, After The Trade Center (edited with Sharon Zukin), Starting From Zero, and Analyzing Ambasz. Forthcoming in 2005 and 2006 are Twenty Minutes in Manhattan, Against The Wall, Work on the City, All Over the Map, and Indefensible Space.

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Samir Srouji is an Architect, artist and art director. Born in Nazareth 1961, he has been living and working between Nazareth and Boston. Srouji studied architecture at the University of Oklahoma, graduated in 1986. He worked in Boston for 10 years before establishing ‘Samir Y. Srouji Architect' in Nazareth in 1996; where he worked on various institutional, residential and architectural installation projects including in Jerusalem and Bethlehem. His art works include multi-media, installations, and architectural interventions. Exhibited in various solo and group shows including; at Gallery Anadiel, Tel Aviv Art House, and Kibbutz Gallery. He is a founding member of Al-mámal foundation for Contemporary Art in Jerusalem. Currently he is a senior architect with William Wilson architects of Boston involved with academic projects including the new physical sciences center at Harvard with Studio Rafael Moneo.

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Boaz Tamir holds a Ph.D. in Political Science from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He has extensive experience in entrepreneurship, company management and academic activity. He has contributed his knowledge to the business development and marketing of some of the largest and most successful organizations in Israel including: Clal Industries-Electronics, Elite Industries and Paz–Oil and Gas company. Dr. Tamir is a founding partner of Montefiore Partners Venture Capital fund, as well as the founding partner and director of Romold Group, a multinational company, specializing in environmental technologies and focusing on the development and production of infrastructure products for water and waste-water management and telecommunication. Additionally, Dr. Tamir founded and directed, with PWCL Accountants, Ya'ad Business Development Ltd. a leading consulting company and was the founder and CEO of Be-Connected – Telecom Company.

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Salim Tamari Director, Institute of Jerusalem Studies (Jerusalem) & Department of Sociology and Anthropology Birzeit University, Birzeit, Palestine. Visiting Professor, Dept. of History University of California at Berkeley (2005). He is the editor of Jerusalem Quarterly (Jerusalem) Hawiliyat al Quds. His recent publications include: 2005 The Sea Against Mountain: Essays on Contemporary Palestinian Urban Culture Society ; Muwatin Publications; 2005 Three Years of Delicious Anarchy: War, Crowds and the Creation of New Urban Sensibilities Palestine after WWI --research in progress; 2005 The King of Palestine and other Essays on Palestinian History, an edited volume with Issam Nassar, Institute for Jerusalem Studies and al Quds University; 2005 Al Quds al Intidabiyyah fil Mudhakarat al Jawhariyyah, (Mandate Jerusalem, Jawhariyyeh Memoirs), Volume 2, Institute of Jeruslem Studies, with the Heinrich Boll Foundation (Jerusalem and Beirut), (edited with an introduction by Salim Tamari and Issam Nasar) forthcoming.

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John Tirman is executive director of the Center for International Studies at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Previously, he held senior posts with the Social Science Research Council, the Winston Foundation, and the Union of Concerned Scientists, and was Fulbright Senior Scholar in Cyprus in 1999-2000.  He is author, or coauthor and editor, of nine books on international affairs, and more than one hundred articles, including several examining Middle East politics.

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Lawrence Vale is Professor Urban Design and Planning and Head of the Department of Urban Studies and Planning at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He has taught in the School of Architecture and Planning since 1988. He holds degrees from Amherst College (B.A.), Massachusetts Institute of Technology (S.M.Arch.S.), and the University of Oxford (D.Phil.). Vale is the author or editor of six books examining urban design and housing. These include four award-winning volumes: Architecture, Power, and National Identity (1992), a book about capital city design on six continents; From the Puritans to the Projects: Public Housing and Public Neighbors (2000) ; Reclaiming Public Housing: A Half Century of Struggle in Three Public Neighborhoods (2002); and The Resilient City: How Modern Cities Recover From Disaster (ed., with Thomas Campanella, 2005). His awards and honors include a Rhodes Scholarship, a Guggenheim Fellowship, the Spiro Kostof Book Award for Architecture and Urbanism from the Society of Architectural Historians, the "Best Book in Urban Affairs" Award from the Urban Affairs Association, the Chester Rapkin Award from the Association of Collegiate Schools of Planning, an EDRA/Places Award for “Place Research,” and the John M. Corcoran Award for Community Investment.

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Heather Widdows is from the Centre for the Study of Global Ethics at the University of Birmingham, UK, where she teaches moral philosophy and bioethics. Her research interests include, the foundations of moral value from a philosophical perspective, including moral realism, relativism and universalism; communication across belief-systems and value frameworks in the context of liberal democracies; and bioethical issues, particularly, reproductive, research and genetic ethics. She currently has a visiting fellowship at Harvard University, where she is working on the topic of ‘Liberal Democracy, Religion and Ethics.' She is particularly concerned with the way liberal democracies articulate and justify moral positions and so communicate with those who assert competing value frameworks. Dr Widdows' publications include a book on The Moral Vision of Iris Murdoch and an edited collection, to be published this year, on Women's Reproductive Rights, in addition to articles and book chapters on all her areas of interest.

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Haim Yacobi is a Lecturer at the Department of Architecture at the Bezalel Academy Jerusalem and a post-doctorate at the Department of Politics and Government at the Ben Gurion University. He writes and publishes extensively articles that critically analyze the politics of space and place in Israel. His academic work focuses on the urban as a political, social and cultural entity. The main issues that stand in the center of his research in relation to the urban space are social justice, the politics of identity, migration, globalization and urban planning. His edited book: Constructing a Sense of Place: Architecture and the Zionist Discourse was published recently (Ashgate).

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Yossi Yonah is a Lecturer at the Department of Education, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev. Recent publications include: "Parental Choice in Israel ; Rationales and Practical Constraints," in Reuven Kahane (ed), Educational Advancement (Jerusalem, 1995); "Constitutional Citizenship, a Nation State or a Multicultural Society? Israel and the Limits of Liberal Democracy," Alpayim (1998) [Hebrew]; "Fifty Years Later: The Scope and Limits of Liberal Democracy in Israel," Constellations (1999); "State and Religion in Israel: The Boundaries of Liberal Democracy in Israel and the Limits of Political Liberalism," Iyyun: The Jerusalem Philosophical Quarterly (2000) [Hebrew]. F orthcoming book In Virtue of Difference: The Multicultural Project in Israel (in Hebrew).

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Raef Zreik graduated from the Law School at Hebrew University, first and second degree, and practiced law for 10 years in Israel on issues of land and planning, during which he was a political and human rights activist. He received another Master's from Columbia Law School in 2001, and is now writing his doctoral dissertation at Harvard Law School in the field of legal theory-theories of rights. Throughout the years wrote extensively about issues of space, identity, citizenship for Arabic, Hebrew and English media. Among his publications: “Law and reshaping the space,” in Hagar-The Journal of International Social Studies, “Exit from the scene: Reflections on the idea of public sphere for the Palestinians in Israel,” “Palestine as exile” in Global Jurists, “The Palestinian question: themes of power and justice” and “Israel, Apartheid and rights discourse” both in the Journal of Palestine Studies.

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