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Spotlight Archive 2006-07
Spotlight Archive 2005-06
Spotlight Archive 2004-05
Spotlight Archive 2003-04
SPOTLIGHT ARCHIVE
An archive of events the have been previously spotlighted by the Center.


 
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Samuels On 'Japan's About-Face'

Richard Samuels, director of CIS and Ford International Professor of Political Science, provides commentary for a new PBS film on the Japanese military. Samuels discusses the evolution of the U.S.-Japan relationship and the potential of a militarily-independent Japan. Samuels also provided some assistance with the film, entitled Japan's About-Face, which premieres this week.


Iraq photos
War's Human Side

Reports say the violence in Iraq is the lowest since March 2004. Security in Iraq is cited as fragile, but sources tell us that Maliki's government is making great strides and gaining confidence both among themselves and the people. The news sounds hopeful. Still, we are reminded by historian and CIS research affiliate Juan Cole that the war's toll on Iraqi lives remains grossly underreported, numbing us to the human side. Iraq: the Human Cost, a web site that the Center and Hyperstudio launched in 2007, is another chilling reminder of the devastation of war. The site is a resource on the Iraq war and its toll in deaths, displacement, poverty, and other effects. Featured on the site are eyewitness photos by AP photographer Anja Niedringhause.


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CIS Hosts Screening of Discovery's China Doc

In the wake of the catastrophic earthquake in China's Sichuan province and on the eve of the Olympics this August in Beijing, Discovery Channel Managing Editor Ted Koppel presents Koppel on Discovery: The People's Republic of Capitalism, a sweeping four-part series that examines modern China. An advance screening of the documentary, followed by a question-and-answer session with some of the programs' producers, will be hosted by MIT's Center for International Studies. The screening is open to the public and will be held on MIT campus on Wed, June 18, at 6:00p, at the Broad Institute auditorium.

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American Empires, Pakistan, and Israel-Palestine

The Center's Audit of the Conventional Wisdom series continues with the following: A conversation with Alice Amsden, Barton L. Weller Professor of Political Economy at MIT, on her latest book Escape from Empire; Paula Newberg, specialist in governance, development and democracy, discusses Pakistan's governance; and Anat Biletzki, visiting fellow in the Center's Program on Human Rights and Justice, offers thoughts on the Israeli-Palestinian peace process. The Audits tour the horizon of conventional wisdoms that define U. S. foreign policy, and puts them to the test of data and history.

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Students Speak About America in the World

Twenty-five MIT students were asked to write about the most important challenge facing our world and what the United States should do to intervene. The essays, each consisting of 250 words, were then bundled into a booklet entitled, America in the World: MIT Speaks. This is the first publication of the Forum on American Progress, an MIT student organization whose aim is to promote greater discussion of American foreign policy at MIT. "Make Energy a Real Priority," "Demand Accountability from the Individual," "Allow for Innovation in America's Middle East Policy," and "Embrace the Developing World's Growth," are among the issues raised by the students. The annual publication will be sent to the next presidential administration and represents FAP's latest effort to expand its activities on campus. The publication was sponsored in part by CIS.

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CIS's Latest Newsletter Available Now

The spring isue of the Center's newsletter, précis, is now available. Essays include: "Five Myths About the Iraq Jihad," by Stephanie Kaplan, PhD candidate in political science and member of the Center's Security Studies Program; an excerpt from The Politics of Official Apologies (Cambridge University Press, 2008) a new book by Melissa Nobles, associate professor of political science at MIT. Also featured is an interview with Robert Art, director of the Center's Seminar XXI Program and professor of international relations at Brandeis University; and an article on the Center's Starr Forum event with Al-Qaeda expert Marc Sageman entitled "Leaderless Jihad: Radicalization in the West."

China Forum
MIT Launches Forum on China

The MIT China Forum, a new series of talks on current developments of Chinese industry, government, and education will commence on May 14 with a talk by Yingyi Qian, dean of the School of Economics and Management at Tsinghua University and professor of economics at UC Berkeley. The China Forum is sponsored by the Office of the Associate Provost and is part of a broader MIT initiative to foster ties with China. To that end, a new China Working Group of MIT faculty and staff with interests in and knowledge of greater China was formed. Ed Steinfeld, associate professor of political science and director of the Center's MIT-China Program, and Sean Gilbert, director of Intern Placement at the Center's MIT-China Program, are both members. The talk will be on Wed, May 14, at 2:00p, at the MIT Stata Center, 32-G449.

Int Review
Best Doctoral Student Paper Award

Kristin Fabbe, a PhD student in the political science department, won the Best Doctoral Student Paper Award for Eurasia/Turkey at the Association for the Study of Nationalities 2008 World Convention for her paper "Defining Minorities and Identities: Religious Categorization and State-Making Strategies in Greece and Turkey." Fabbe attended the conference with support from a CIS/Starr Student Travel Fellowship.

MIT Israel
Israel at 60: Technology, Politics, and the Israeli Psyche

On Thursday, May 15, the Center's MIT-Israel Program will host a send-off for students who will be traveling to Israel this summer. Rony Yediddia, Consul of Israel at the Consulate General of Israel to New England, will be the guest speaker. The event is open to the public and will commence with a falafel dinner at 6:30p, in MIT Bldg E39, floor six conference room.

Int Review
International Review, Spring 2008, Now Available

The spring 2008 issue of MIT International Review is now available. The journal is sponsored in part by CIS, and is MIT's first interdisciplinary journal of international affairs. The cover story is "The Economics of Counterterrorism." Also featured is a piece by Diane Davis, "Insecure and Secure Cities: Towards a Reclassification of World Cities in a Global Era." Davis is co-director of the Center's Jerusalem 2050 Program, professor of political sociology, and head of the International Development Group at MIT.

Diane Davis
Davis on the Reclassification of World Cities

The CIS/IDG Working Group on Violent Conflict and Economic Institutions presents its second invitational speaker presentation: Diane Davis, professor of political sociology, and head of the International Development Group at MIT. Her talk, entitled "Insecure and Secure Cities: Towards a Reclassification of World Cities in a Global Era," will take place on Thursday, May 8, at 6:30p, in the DUSP Stella Room, MIT Bldg 7-338. Food will be served. The paper can be downloaded here.

'Audits' on Wilsonianism and Global Development
Walsh Testifies on Iran's Nuclear Ambitions

Jim Walsh, a research associate at the Center's Security Studies Program, testified before the U.S. Senate Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs on April 24, 2008. Walsh addressed the status of Iran's nuclear activities and current U.S. policy. He argues that American policy is failing and offers alternatives. Read Walsh's draft testimony. Related is a recent article co-authored by Walsh, A Solution for the US-Iran Nuclear Standoff, published in the New York Review of Books.

So Wrong for So Long
Starr Forum: The Failings of the Media on Iraq

Author and Editor Greg Mitchell comes to MIT to talk about his latest book, So Wrong for So Long, which chronicles the failings of the corporate media coverage on the war in Iraq. He is the editor of Editor & Publisher where he writes the column "Pressing Issues," and is the author of eight books. So Wrong for So Long, published February 2008, has received a tremendous response, ranging from appearances on Jim Lehrer NewsHour, NPR and Democracy Now! to reviews in the L.A. Times and Vanity Fair online. The Starr Forum event will be on Wed, May 7, at 6:00p, in the Stata Center, MIT Bldg 32-141.

'Audits' on Wilsonianism and Global Development
'Audits' on Wilsonianism, Global Development

The Center's Audit of the Conventional Wisdom publication series continues with recent essays adapted from a January 2008 conference entitled "The Liberal Foreign Policy Tradition," cosponsored by CIS, the Woodrow Wilson Center, and the History and Democracy Project. The essays include: "Wilson and the Founders: the Roots of Liberal Foreign Policy" (Ted Widmer, Brown University); "Wilson, Bush, and the Evolution of Liberal Foreign Policy" (Tony Smith, Tufts University); and "Wilson's Radical Vision for Global Governance" (Erez Manela, Harvard University). Also recently published is "The Good and Bad News of Global Development," adapted from an acceptance by Dani Rodrik, Harvard University, of the Albert O. Hirschman Prize, presented on November 1, 2007, by the Social Science Research Council.

Summer Courses on Innovation, Biosecurity
Summer Courses on Innovation, Biosecurity

The Center's Security Studies Program is offering two courses during the 2008 summer session for professional studies. From Technology to Innovation: Putting Ideas to Work, offered July 14-17, explores innovations in both public and private organizations in an effort to identify best practices. Combating Bioterrorism/Pandemics: Implementing Policies for Biosecurity, offered July 28-30, looks at the challenges public health, law enforcement, and national security agencies face in ensuring biosecurity.

On the Calendar
On the Calendar

Tuesday, April 22, Rafael Rodriguez Prieto, Universidad Pablo de Olavide de Sevilla, Visiting Scholar, Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University, presents a talk on "Basque Nationalism and Terrorism in Spain, Does Identity Undermine Democracy?"; Tuesday, April 22, Noah Feldman, Harvard Law School, lectures on "Iraq in the Light of Population Movement"; and on Wednesday, April 23, Erwan Lagadec, French Navy, reflects on "The French EU Presidency, ESDP and NATO".


CIS Scholar Garners Guggenheim, Carnegie Awards
CIS Scholar Garners Guggenheim, Carnegie Awards

Ashutosh Varshney, a visiting scholar at CIS, was named both a Guggenheim fellow and Carnegie scholar for 2008. Guggenheim fellows are appointed on the basis of outstanding achievement and exceptional promise for continued accomplishment. The annual competition awarded 190 fellowships from more than 2,600 applicants, with prizes totaling $8,200,000. As a Carnegie scholar, Varshney is among 20 recipients selected for "their compelling ideas and commitment to enriching the quality of the public dialogue on Islam." The Carnegie scholars will receive two-year grants of up to $100,000 each. Varshney received his PhD from the MIT political science department in 1990 and is a professor at the University of Michigan.



CIS Awards 16 Summer Study Grants

The Center is pleased to announce the recipients of its Summer Study Grants. The grants are being awarded to sixteen doctoral students in international affairs at MIT. Each will receive up to $4,500 for summer studies, which may be used for fieldwork, archival research, or home-based research and write-up. Criteria for the awards include the importance of the research question, the quality of the research proposal, and strong letters of support.




PHRJ Summer Funding Nears Deadline

The deadline for submission of applications to the Program on Human Rights and Justice (PHRJ) summer internships is April 25. The internships are available for undergraduate and graduate students at MIT and can be arranged with non-governmental or inter-governmental organizations, social movements, or business organizations concerned with issues related to human rights, justice and sustainable development, broadly conceived. Also, the Graduate Student Council (GSC) has passed funding for an additional graduate-level human rights and justice fellowship to be awarded through PHRJ, which will provide another means for MIT graduate students to work on social and community issues related to human rights. The PHRJ Summer Internship and the GSC Fellowship provide modest stipends for travel and living expenses, a total not exceeding $5,000.




Leaderless Jihad: Radicalization in the West

Marc Sageman, an expert on al Qaeda and related terrorist organizations, discusses how, in a post-9-11 world, people end up on the path to political violence. His talk builds upon his best-selling book, Understanding Terror Networks, and is based upon his recent publication, Leaderless Jihad. Sageman is an independent researcher on terrorism and the founder of Sageman Consulting, LLC. He holds various academic positions at George Washington University, the University of Maryland and national think tanks. The CIS Starr Forum event will be held on Wed, April 9, at 4:30p, in MIT Bldg E51-376.




Films: Iraq's War Story, Corporations & Human Rights

My Home-Your War, a documentary shot in Baghdad before, during and after the invasion of Iraq, is a profoundly moving film that brings a perspective rarely available to U.S. audiences—how the war has affected the average Iraqi. Ban Al-Mahfodh, a native of Basra, will offer insights. The screening will be on Tues, April 8, at 5:30p, in MIT Bldg 6-120. Another film, The Constant Gardener, looks at the threat that corporations pose to human rights. A screening and panel discussion will take place on April 10, at 7:00p, in MIT Bldg. 4-370.




What Happened in Basra? CIS Scholars Help Explain

Barry Posen, director of the Center's Security Studies Program, Juan Cole, a CIS research affiliate, and other scholars, were featured on WBUR's "On Point." The scholars discussed with host Tom Ashbrook the recent rise of Moktada al-Sadr and his militia in the southern oil port of Basra. Listen to Basra: Defining Moment? Related, is a recent CIS Audit on Iraq by Juan Cole. Stephen Van Evera, associate director of CIS, was featured on Minnesota Public Radio on the topic "Calm returns to Iraq?"




April 2: A Tribute to Ghandi

In tribute to the memory of Indian leader and peace activist Monhandas Karamchand Gandhi, on the 60th anniversary of his assassination, the Center's MIT-India Program will feature a film screening of a new documentary entitled Gandhi. The screening will be followed by a brief discussion by Neelam Deo, consul general of India in New York. The event will be on Wed, April 2, at 7:00p in MIT Bldg 3-270.




Israel's 'Last Chance' for a Peace Deal

Bernard Avishai, author of The Tragedy of Zionism and the forthcoming The Hebrew Republic, will give a lecture entitled Globalized Israel: Why Olmert's Center Government is the Last—and Best—Chance for a Peace Deal. Avishai's talk is sponsored by the Emile Bustani Middle East Seminar and is organized with support from CIS. The talk will be on Tues, April 1, at 4:30p, in MIT Bldg E51-095.




Sloan Senior Receives Carnegie Junior Fellowship

Ali Wyne, a senior at MIT's Sloan School of Management, was selected as a junior fellow for the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace (CEIP)-a fellowship administered by CIS. Each year the Endowment offers 8-10 one-year fellowships to outstanding seniors and recent graduates from a pool of nominees from close to 300 colleges. Carnegie junior fellows work as research assistants to the Endowment's senior associates. Ali will be serving as a junior fellow for Minxin Pei, the director of CEIP's China Program, from August 2008 to August 2009.




Announcing the Winners of Just Jerusalem

The Jerusalem 2050 Program, a joint initiative sponsored by the Department of Urban Studies and Planning and the Center for International Studies, announced today the winners of its global Just Jerusalem competition. The open contest sought proposals that addressed different aspects of urban life in a futurist Jerusalem. Participants were asked to look beyond the current nation-state conflict and, instead, focus on 'just' the city as a place where, by mid-century, its citizenries co-exist in peace. Click here for competition results




US-Iran Nuclear Compromise

Should the US negotiate with a nuclear Iran? A growing number of Western and Iranian officials say it should, according to a recent article in the Christian Science Monitor. Because Washington's 'zero enrichment' policy hasn't worked, experts claim it's time to consider other options. The creation of an international consortium that would manage a nuclear program on Iranian soil tops the list. The CS Monitor article references "A Solution for the US-Nuclear Standoff," a piece published in the New York Review of Books and co-authored by CIS scholar Jim Walsh. Walsh and colleagues argue that "turning Iran's sensitive nuclear activities into a multinational program would reduce the risk of proliferation and create the basis for a broader discussion not only of our disagreements but of our common interests as well."




Dissolving War: Women as Peacemakers

Sanam Naraghi Anderlini's latest book, "Women Building Peace: What They Do, Why it Matters," continues her groundbreaking exploration of gender and conflict. A longtime consultant to the UN and NGOs on these issues, Anderlini has produced several important field studies and analyses of how women build and sustain peace in their war-torn countries and communities, often in unconventional ways. Anderlini, a research affiliate at CIS, will be speaking at MIT on Friday, March 14, at 10:30 am (Bldg 32-124). The talk is co-sponsored by the Center for International Studies and the Technology and Culture Forum. More details here.




Film Screenings on Middle East Conflict, Emigration

The Center will feature two film screenings in March: The Syrian Bride, which looks at the Middle East conflict through lives fractured by the region's harsh political realities; and Deshantori (The Migrant), which explores the attractions of emigration for young adults in Bangladesh. "The Syrian Bride" will be shown on Sat, March 8, at 5:30 pm (Bldg 6-120), followed by a conversation with Anat Biletzki, a fellow at CIS. The "Deshantori" screening, sponsored by the International Migration Program, will be on Tues, March 11, at 7 pm (Bldg 66-110). Discussing "Deshantori" will be the film's co-director Mridul Chowdury, who is currently a student at the John F. Kennedy School at Harvard University.




China, India, and the Future

Tarun Khana, of Harvard's Business School, will give a talk entitled "Billions of Entrepreneurs: How China and India are Reshaping Their Future and Yours." The talk will be moderated by S. P. Kothari, deputy dean, MIT's Sloan School of Management. The event is sponsored by the Center's MIT-India Program and will be held on Wed, March 5, 7:00p, in MIT Bldg 32-141.

 




SSP Wednesday Seminars

The Security Studies program's Wednesday Seminar Series presents the following talks in March: "The Law of War and the Evolution of Counterinsurgency in Iraq" by Colin Kahl, Georgetown University, on March 5; "Can the 'War on Terror' be Won?" by Phil Gordon, Brookings Institution, on March 12; and "Buying National Security: U.S. Planning and Resource Allocation for Security and Foreign Affairs" by Cindy Williams, MIT, on March 19. The talks are held at noon in MIT E38-615.




New Working Groups: China and the Middle East

CIS is sponsoring two new working groups: Middle East Security Politics, which looks at the pressing issues that affect the regions, including traditional military conflict, economic security, civil military relations, and internal security, among others. And China Politics, which considers the ramifications of Chinese development for the broader global commons and the implications of the Chinese case for general social science theory. The new groups are two of several interdisciplinary groups sponsored by CIS that tackle research issues not confined to a single department. The groups are structured to generate meaningful scholarly work on a host of academic and policy issues and are open to both faculty and students. Visit CIS Working Groups to learn more.



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CIS Showcased in Tokyo

Approximately 100 American Chamber of Commerce (ACCJ) members attended a luncheon at the Roppongi Hills Club, featuring CIS director Richard J. Samuels and two MIT graduates and MIT-Japan Program alumni based in Japan. Alberto Moel, Principal, Monitor Group, and Bryan Banish, Vice President and Director of Teradyne K.K., presented "Winners and Losers in Japan's High-Tech Manufacturing Culture." Moderators were Richard J. Samuels and Robert Feldman, Chief Economist of Morgan Stanley Japan. A symposium titled "Meeting a Rising China," with over 200 participants from across academia and industry, was jointly held by the MIT-Japan Program and Keizai Koho Center at Keidanren Kaikan. U.S. Ambassador J. Thomas Schieffer delivered a keynote speech on "The Strategic Choices for Northeast Asia in the 21st Century." This was followed by a panel that discussed how the rise of China is affecting the domestic politics of countries throughout the region, including China itself. Speakers on this panel were Security Studies Program member and Assistant Professor of Political Science Taylor Fravel, CIS affiliate and Associate Professor of Political Science Edward Steinfeld, and Dr. George Gilboy, China country manager for Woodside Energy Australia and Senior Fellow at CIS. The second panel considered the regional dimension and featured Professor Chikako Kawakatsu Ueki of Waseda University, Dr. Robert Madsen, CIS Senior Research Fellow, and Professor Takashi Shiraishi of the National Graduate Institute for Policy. The symposium was closed by Akihiko Tanaka Professor of International Politics at the University of Tokyo and by Professor Samuels.

Please click here for the symposium agenda.



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Seminar Series on International Migration

The Myron Weiner Seminar on International Migration will host a presentation on Tuesday, February 19, 4:30-6:00p, by Judith Kumin, Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees, on the topic: "The Changing Role of UNHCR: Internal Displacement, Mixed Migration and other New Challenges" Location: Carr Center Seminar Room (Room 219), Rubenstein Building (2nd floor) John F. Kennedy School of Government, 79 JFK Street, Cambridge, MA. It is labeled as "One Eliot" on the map. Reed Ueda and Anna Hardman Co-Chairs, Migration Committee Steering Group




On the Calendar

Here is a sampling of some of CIS's upcoming events (for more, see the CIS calendar):

The Myron Weiner Seminar Series on International Migration begins on Tuesday, February 5 with a screening and discussion of the documentary "The Guestworker," with Helen Marrow (Lecturer in Social Studies at Harvard University). Marrow's talk commences at Tufts University's Olin Center, Room 012.The series is sponsored by the Inter-University Committee on International Migration, which includes Boston University, Brandeis University, the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy, Harvard University, MIT, Tufts University, and Wellesley College. The SSP Wednesday Seminar Series runs from 12 to 1:30PM in E38-615 every Wednesday. On February 6, Admiral Thad Allen (Commandant, U.S. Coast Guard) speaks on the U.S. Coast Guard and the New Security Environment. The CIS Film Series 2008: Women and the Middle East begins on February 8 with a screening of Inch'Allah Dimanche and a discussion with Meriam Belli of the MIT History Department.



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CIS Film Series 2008: Inch'Allah Dimanche

This Spring CIS presents three films from the Middle East, based in Algeria/France, Israel/The Golan Heights and Iraq before, during and after the US war and invasion in 2003. The films focus on the lives of three women, linked together by their Middle Eastern identity and a variety of challenging issues. They are portrayed while following their life paths amidst the political and social trials common to the region. Meriam Belli, Anat Biletzki and Ban Al-Mahfodh from MIT will discuss some background aspects to the three films presented (respectively). They will aim to examine the socio-political context that Middle Eastern women are facing in the region. Both the films and speakers will attempt to throw light on their roles as women within the context of trying circumstances of isolation, tribulation and modern warfare, while holding on to freedom of spirit.

The CIS Film Series 2008 kicks off on February 8 with a screening of "Inch'Allah Dimanche." French/Algerian director Yamina Benguigi brings us a passionate immigrant story of a woman struggling against old world traditions. Zouina leaves her homeland with her three children to join her husband in France, where he's been living for the past ten years. In a land and culture foreign to her, Zouina struggles to adjust to her new life but eventually discovers a rekindled sense of adventure sparked by her longing for freedom and experience. Winner of the International Critics Award at the Toronto International Film Festival and the Grand Prize at the Marrakech International Film Festival. Discussing the film is Meriam N. Belli of the MIT History Deptartment.

Please click here for series poster.

Friday, February 8, 2008
3-270
5:30-8pm



Dick Samuels
CIS Director Named Finalist for Lionel Gelber Prize

Richard J. Samuels is one of five finalists for the Lionel Gelber Prize, one of the world's leading awards for books on international affairs. Samuels, director of CIS and Ford International Professor of Political Science, is nominated for Securing Japan: Tokyo's Grand Strategy and the Future of East Asia, published last September by Cornell University Press. The prize, awarded since 1989, is sponsored by Lionel Gelber Foundation, the Munk Center for International Studies at the University of Toronto, and Foreign Policy magazine. The winner will be announced March 3.


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CIS Doctoral Candidate Receives World Politics Grant

The Smith Richardson Foundation has announced that MIT Political Science doctoral candidate Llewelyn Hughes has received the World Politics and Statecraft Fellowship. The objective of this prestigious award is to support the research and writing of policy-relevant dissertations through funding of fieldwork, archival research, and language training. In evaluating applications, the Foundation accords preference to those projects that could directly inform U.S. policy debates and thinking, rather than dissertations that are principally focused on abstract theory or debates within a scholarly discipline. Hughes, a member of the CIS's Security Studies Program, is working on his dissertation, which examines "how changes in the structure of the international petroleum market have affected the energy policies of Japan, the United States, and France."


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CIS Publishes Fall 2007 Newsletter

The fall issue of the Center's bi-annual newsletter, précis, is now available. précis covers the wide range of Center activities and tracks the accomplishments of our faculty, researchers and affiliates. Essays in this issue include: the Israel Lobby and U.S. Foreign Policy, America's Foreign Policy Consensus, and Waiting for Goldilocks in Japan. The current issue is available here.


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IAP 2008 Offerings

CIS participates in several new IAP courses in January 2008. This year's Security Studies Program military fellows will each teach their own course in the series "Contemporary Military Topics." Lt. Col Lou Lartigue will teach "COIN in Operation Iraqi Freedom," Col. Harry C. Bass will teach "The 21st Century Marine Corps: Embracing Change," and Lt. Col. Todd Piergrossi will teach "US Air Force Cyber Warfare: More Than Just Hacking." Patricia Gercik, associate director of MISTI, will co-teach a seminar entitled "Israel: History, Culture and Identity," and Anat Biletzksi, a fellow in the Center's Program on Human Rights and Justice, will teach a course on "Human Rights in the Middle East: Israel-Palestine As a Case Study." See MIT's online IAP listings for sign-up requirements and meeting times.


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Washington Conference on Liberal Tradition in Foreign Policy

CIS is convening a conference at the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars on Thursday, January 10, to dissect the liberal tradition in U.S. foreign policy. Cosponsored with the History and Democracy Project and the U.S. Division of the Wilson Center, the invitation-only meeting of 60 scholars, journalists, and congressional aides features presentations by leading historians on several enduring themes, such as human rights, democracy, and economic justice. The historians include Elizabeth Borgwardt, Edward Widmer, Erez Manela, Tony Smith, Charles Maier, and Amy Staples. Papers and a webcast of the conference will be available at a later date.


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Iraq: The Human Cost

"Iraq: The Human Cost," a new web site launched by CIS and HyperStudio, is now available. The site features resources on the Iraq war and its human toll in deaths, displacement, poverty, other effects and award-winning photos by AP photographer Anja Niedringhaus. The web site is http://web.mit.edu/humancostiraq/.



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MISTI Announces MIT-Israel

The Center's MIT-Israel Program will send interns to Israel starting summer 2008. Interns will prepare during IAP and the spring semester with courses in Israeli history and culture. Interested students should contact the MIT-Israel program director, Christine Ortiz, associate professor, Department of Materials Science and Engineering. MIT-Israel is one of nine country programs that are part of the MIT International Science and Technology Initiatives (MISTI). Hear from students about their life-changing experiences through intern quotes and the MISTIblog.


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Randy Forsberg Memorial Service

A memorial service for the world-renowned peace activist and defense intellectual Randy Forsberg will be held at MIT on Saturday, December 15. Randy, who died on October 20 in New York after a long illness, earned her Ph.D. in political science at MIT and was a member of the Security Studies Program. Her idea for a freeze on nuclear arms deployments in 1980 helped spur a worldwide social movement to end the arms race, a movement that pressed the U.S. and USSR to reduce nuclear arsenals and contributed to the end of the Cold War. She founded the Institute for Defense and Disarmament Studies and was Anne and Bernard Spitzer Chair in Political Science at City College of New York. She persisted in her efforts to end the nuclear danger throughout her life. Event details.


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Historian and Blogger Juan Cole on Iraq

Juan Cole, professor of history at the University of Michigan, will be speaking at MIT on "Iraq's Three Civil Wars: Is the U.S. Relevant to Them?" A distinguished scholar of the Middle East, Cole has written extensively about Egypt, Iran, and Iraq, as well as South Asia. After Sept. 11, he launched a Weblog, "Informed Comment," to offer the public a more accurate interpretation of the Middle East. "Informed Comment" became a phenomenon, generating in some months as many as a million page views, and making him one of the top bloggers in the world. The CIS Starr Forum event, co-sponsored by the history department at MIT, will be on Monday, Dec. 10, at 5 p.m., in MIT Bldg. 66-110.


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MISTI Events in December

The Center's International Education Program (MISTI) is hosting several upcoming events, including: Kamakuri: The Roots of Japanese Robot Technology on December 4; Nationalism and Development: Asia and the Rest of the World on December 5; and Politics in France: A View from the Left on December 6. The events are free and open to the public. For details on all CIS events, visit our calendar.


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Books by CIS Scholars

CIS scholars have published six books this calendar year. Regulating Capital, by David Singer, describes how political pressures affect international regulation. Alice Amsden compares America's relationship with the developing world in her book Escape from Empire. Richard Samuels' Securing Japan assesses Japanese security policy and the future of East Asia. Terror Insurgency and the State, co-edited by John Tirman, is a compilation of a dozen scholars work on rebel groups. Service to Country, co-edited by Cindy Williams, looks at ongoing changes in military personnel policies. Sally Sara details the lives of several African women in GoGo Mama.


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European Career Fair and Panel, Feb. 1-4

Connect with leading companies and research institutes offering career and internship opportunities across Europe. Organized by MIT's European Club and sponsored by MISTI, the 12th Annual European Career Fair in collaboration with the European Commission will be held on MIT campus. A panel discussion comprised of speakers from academia and industry on both sides of the Atlantic will launch the event on Feb. 1, 2008. Registration is now open.


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America, Iraq, and the Gassing of Halabja

Joost Hiltermann discusses his new book "A Poisonous Affair: America, Iraq, and the Gassing of Halabja," which addresses how, in the 1980s, Iraq amassed chemical weapons to target Iranian soldiers and Kurdish villagers as America looked the other way. Today, these policies are coming back to haunt the West. Hiltermann is the deputy program director for the Middle East, North Africa, and Istanbul, Turkey at the International Crisis Group. He is based in Amman, Jordan, and manages a team of analysts conducting research and writing policy-focused reports on the factors that increase the risk of and drive armed conflict. The event will be on Thursday, November 15, at 4:30p, in MIT Bldg E51-315.


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SSP Wednesday Seminars in November, December

The Security Studies program's Wednesday seminar series finishes the fall semester with the following talks: "The Rise of Afghanistan's Insurgency" (Nov. 7) by Seth Jones, United Nations; "Military Adaptation of Red Teaming" (Nov. 14) by Kevin Benson, U.S. Army, retired; "How Taiwan Makes Friends and Gains Influence on the Mainland" (Nov. 28) by Shelley Rigger, Davidson College; and "Republican Security Theory for the Polis to the Global Village" (Dec. 5) by Daniel Deudney, John Hopkins University. The talks are at noon in MIT Bldg E38-615.


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USA Today's Barbara Slavin on Iran and United States

Barbara Slavin, chief diplomatic correspondent, USA Today, discusses her new book, "Bitter Friends, Bosom Enemies: Iran, the U.S., and the Twisted Path to Confrontation." Since 1996, Slavin has been responsible for analyzing foreign news and U.S. foreign policy for USA Today. She has covered such key issues as the U.S.-led war on terrorism, policy toward "rogue" states, the reform movement in Iran and the Arab-Israeli conflict. She has also accompanied two Secretaries of State on their official travels and reported from Libya, Israel, Egypt, North Korea, Russia, China, Saudi Arabia and Syria. The event, which is co-sponsored by CIS and the Iranian Study Group at MIT, will be on Thursday, November 8, from 6:00p-7:30p in MIT Bldg 32-155.


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Forum on Civil Society, Security, and Human Rights

Julie Mertus, professor of ethics and global affairs at American University and author of "Bait and Switch: Human Rights and U.S. Foreign Policy," discusses the role of civil society in influencing American foreign policy on human rights. In her talk, "Don't Be an American Idiot," Mertus reflects on the following: How does the U.S. use human rights in its foreign policy? Does the occupant of the White House matter when it comes to the projection of U.S. human rights interests abroad? What is the role of civil society in making human rights matter? The Starr Forum event will be on Tuesday, November 6, from 6:00p-7:30p in MIT Bldg 66-110.


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They Got It Right: Posen, Van Evera on Iran

MIT Professors Barry Posen and Stephen Van Evera anticipate a U.S. military strike against Iran, and both share their reasons in an interview with Chris Lydon on his program, Open Source. "They got it right" is a reference by Lydon to a prophetic ad that Posen and Van Evera, along with 31 other scholars, paid for and posted five years ago in the New York Times concerning the dire consequences should U.S. invade Iraq. Lydon speaks with the two scholars about a sequel in Iran and "why we, citizens, we media, and the chatter along the 2008 campaign trail all sound so helpless, so oblivious about the extended catastrophe." Posen is director of the Center's Security Studies program and Ford International Professor of Political Science at MIT. Van Evera is associate director of CIS and professor of political science at MIT.


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Spotlight on Security Studies Alumnae

Jessica Eve Karnis completed a master's degree in political science last summer and now works at the Navy's Joint Warfare Analysis Center (JWAC). To learn more about Karnis and her role as an analyst for JWAC's Quantitative Assessments Cell of the Iraq Support Team, click here.


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On the Calendar

"God Needs No Passport: Immigrants and the Changing American Religious Landscape" (Peggy Levitt, Wellesley College, Myron Weiner Seminar Series on International Migration, Tuesday, 10/30); "Lebanon's Political Gridlock" (Augustus Richard Norton, Boston University, Emile Bustani Middle East Seminar, Tuesday, 10/30); "Sovereignty and Traditional Peacemaking in Navajo Nation" (Larry Suskind, Marisa Arpels, Noah Susskind, MIT, Program on Human Rights and Justice, Wednesday, 10/31). For a complete listing of events, visit the CIS calendar.


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CIS Remembers Randy Forsberg

The world renowned peace activist and defense intellectual Randy Forsberg, 64, who earned her Ph.D. in political science at MIT and was a member of the Security Studies Program, died on October 20 in New York after a long illness. Randy's idea for a freeze on nuclear arms deployments in 1980 helped spur a worldwide social movement to end the arms race, a movement that pressed the U.S. and USSR to reduce nuclear arsenals and contributed to the end of the Cold War. She founded the Institute for Defense and Disarmament Studies and was Anne and Bernard Spitzer Chair in Political Science at City College of New York. She persisted in her efforts to end the nuclear danger throughout her life. (See Boston Review article.) "Randy was a brave and tireless visionary leader for peace," says Professor Stephen Van Evera. "She dreamed of changing the world and dedicated her life to make it happen. She was undaunted by the vast size of the problems she addressed or criticism that came her way. Randy thought outside the box: when others sought incremental reforms, she sought ways to transform the landscape. The world is a better place for the work she did and the example she set."


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Human Rights and Politics in Israel-Palestine

On Monday, October 22, Jeff Halper (the coordinating director of the Israeli Committee Against House Demolitions) and Anat Biletzki (professor of philosophy, Tel Aviv University) will present a public lecture on human rights and politics in Israel-Palestine. Biletzki was the former chairperson of B'Tselem—the Israeli Information Center for Human Rights in the Occupied Territories and currently is a visiting fellow in the Center's Program on Human Rights and Justice (PHRJ). The event (co-sponsored by PHRJ and CIS) will begin at 6:30 p.m. in MIT 66-110. For more details, visit the CIS calendar.


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Human Rights, China, Peace Pipeline and Immigration

The Center's "Audit of the Conventional Wisdom" series continues with the following essays: "Who Failed Whom? Assessing the UN's Human Rights Efforts?" by Balakrishnan Rajagopal (Center for International Studies, MIT); "Distracted at the Creation: Washington's China Policy" by Chrisopher Twomey (Naval Postgraduate School); "Iran-Pakistan-India Pipeline: Is it a Peace Pipeline" by Abbas Maleki (International Institute for Caspian Studies in Tehran); and "Immigration Reform: Failure and Prospects" by Tara Magner (National Immigrant Justice Center). The Audits tour the horizon of conventional wisdoms that define U. S. foreign policy, and puts them to the test of data and history. To view all Audit essays, visit our Audit subsite.


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GoGo Mama, a Book by CIS Neuffer Fellow

Sally Sara, the Center's Neuffer fellow, recently published a book that chronicles the lives of twelve very different African women-ranging from a genocide survivor in Rwanda to a famous Egyptian belly dancer turned movie star. GoGo Mama provides an intimate profile of each woman, taking the reader on an adventure across this extraordinary continent. Sara is anchor and senior reporter for the Australian Broadcasting Corporation (ABC). She joined the Center in September as the third recipient of the Neuffer fellowship, which gives a woman journalist working in print, broadcast or online media the opportunity to focus exclusively on human rights journalism.


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Luce Program Deadline Nov. 13

Tuesday, November 13, is this year's deadline for the Luce Scholars program, which is open to seniors, graduate students, alumni from recent classes and junior faculty. The program places young scholars from a wide variety of intellectual fields in 10-month internships in selected countries in East and Southeast Asia, and is aimed at those with no prior experience in Asia.


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New Books by SSP Alumni

Several alumni from the Security Studies program have published or contributed to books on a range of topics: Taylor B. Seybolt, Humanitarian Military Intervention: The Conditions for Success and Failure (Oxford University Press, 2007); Laura Holgate, "Preventing Nuclear Terrorism," in Atoms for Peace: A Future After Fifty Years (Joseph Pilat, ed., Woodrow Wilson Press, 2007); and Fred Kaplan, Daydream Believers: How a Few Grand Ideas Wrecked American Power (forthcoming, Wiley, February 2008). For additional highlights on SSP alumni, click here.


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Just Jerusalem Competition—Ready for Submissions!

. The Jerusalem 2050 program is now ready to accept electronic submissions for its "Just Jerusalem" competition. The goal of the international competition is to generate new approaches to, and potential solutions for, the many complex, seemingly intractable problems that the residents of Jerusalem face on a daily basis. Entries are not limited to architects and urbanists, but include submissions from artists, historians, poets, political scientists, philosophers, economists, engineers, and all others who have ideas for the future of this city. Fellowships at MIT will be awarded to the winning entrants. Visit the competition web site to learn more.


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Seminar Series on International Migration

The Myron Weiner Seminar Series on International Migration begins on Tuesday, October 9, with Daniel Kanstroom (Boston College School of Law) discussing his book, "Deportation Nation: Outsiders in American History." Kanstroom's talk commences at 4:30 p.m. in E38-615. Other speakers in the fall series include: Peggy Levitt (Wellesley College) on October 30, discussing her book, "God Needs No Passport: Immigrants and the Changing American Religious Landscape"; and Kelly Greenhill (Tufts University) on December 11, speaking on population movements, forced migration, and national security. The series is sponsored by the Inter-University Committee on International Migration, which includes Boston University, Brandeis University, the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy, Harvard University, MIT, Tufts University, and Wellesley College.


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Lecture on the DB German Rail Turnaround

The MIT-Germany program brings Matthias Afting (Deutshe Bahn AG, Berlin) to campus to discuss lessons learned from the restructuring of one of Europe's largest government-owned companies. "The DB German Rail Turnaround" lecture will take place on Thursday, October 4, at noon (E52-175). A reminder that students can apply now for paid internships in German companies and research institutes or universities starting in 2008. For opportunities around the globe, visit MISTI's web site. (Photo by Patrick Permien)


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Forum on the Israel Lobby and U.S. Foreign Policy

The CIS Starr Forum presents a public discussion with John Mearsheimer (University of Chicago) and Stephen Walt (Harvard University) on their recent book "The Israel Lobby and U.S. Foreign Policy." Joining the authors will be Bruce Riedel (Brookings Institution). The event will be on Wednesday, October 3, from 6:00-7:30 p.m. in the Kirsch auditorium (Stata Center, Rm. 32-123). The event is free and open to the public. Visit the CIS event calendar for more details.


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Emergent India Conference at MIT

Sponsored in part by CIS's MIT-India program, the Sept. 21 conference "Emergent India: An Engagement with MIT" celebrated the university's century-long relationship with India. Sessions on science and technology, urban planning, poverty, education and health, and new practices of management were presented. Speakers from India engaged in meaningful discussions with MIT faculty panelists, providing a vibrant forum for the community to engage with leaders in India. Watch web cast here.


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New Working Group on Political Leadership

Chappell Lawson, associate professor of political science at MIT, is chairing a new working group on political leadership. The new group is one of several interdisciplinary working groups sponsored by CIS that tackle research issues not confined to a single department. Open to faculty members and students, the groups are structured to generate meaningful scholarly work on a host of academic and policy issues. Global justice, identity politics, insurgency, and the political economy of defense are topics of other working groups. To learn more about these groups and how to join, click here.


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On the Calendar

Below is a sampling of our September events. For a full listing, visit the CIS calendar.

-Ibrahim Warde (Fletcher School) on "Financing Islamic Terrorism" (Emile Bustani Middle East Seminar) (Tuesday, 9/18)

-Taylor Seybolt (U. S. Institute of Peace) on "Strategies of Humanitarian Military Intervention" (Wednesday, 9/19)

-Adele Naude Santos (MIT School of Architecture & Planning) joins other scholars for "Hidden Successes: The Role of Design and Urban Planning in India" (Friday, 9/21)

-Narushige Michishita (Nat'l Graduate Institute for Policy Studies, Tokyo, Japan) on "North Korea's Military-Diplomatic Campaigns: History and Analysis" (Wednesday, 9/26)


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Posen on the Petraeus-Crocker Hearings

Barry Posen comments on General David Petraeus and Ambassador Ryan Crocker's report on Iraq as a guest on NPR's On Point. Posen, who is director of MIT's Security Studies program and Ford International Professor of Political Science, analyzes the general and ambassador's Iraq strategy and provides real-time feedback on Petraeus and Crocker before the Senate Foreign Relations Committee. Listen to the show.


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9/11, A Painful Benchmark for Scholars

The world changed on September 11, 2001. For the Center for International Studies, "it tested the relevance of the knowledge we generate and the quality of the recommendations we make. It also reminded us with painful urgency of our responsibilities as educators and public intellectuals," noted CIS director Richard Samuels. Many works and seminars on terrorism, political violence, security and other related topics continue to be produced by CIS scholars, some of which are featured here: Why Intelligence Isn't to Blame for 9/11; the War on Terror and the Cold War; Immigration and Insecurity: Post-9/11 Fear in the United States; the War on Terror: Forgotten Lessons from WWII; Transnational Violence; the Struggle against Terrorism; Assessing U.S. Strategy in the War on Terror; Budgets to Make America Safer; the New Terrorism; Terrorist Campaigns; Beyond a Militarized Approach to Terrorism; and a Report Card on the War on Terror. The image (courtesy of the U.S. federal government) was taken from a larger collection of photographs of those killed during the terrorists attacks on September 11, 2001; the complete image is available here.


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SSP Wednesday Seminars Begin Sept. 12

The Security Studies program's Wednesday seminar series commences on September 12 with a talk by Stephen Van Evera (associate director of CIS and professor of political science at MIT) on "American Grand Strategy for the New Era." Other topics this fall include: North Korea 's military-diplomatic campaigns, the Middle East in the wake of Iraq, security and governance in Jerusalem, among others. Click here for more details.


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MISTI Open House, Country Program Orientations

Discover MIT's International Science and Technology Initiatives (MISTI) and enjoy international treats and entertainment at MISTI's open house on Wed., Sept. 12 from 2-4 p.m. (La Sala de Puerto Rico, MIT Student Center, W20). For information on opportunities in a specific country, attend one of MISTI's upcoming country program orientations.


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Samuels Gives Keynote Speech to Students

In the first official lecture to MIT's class of 2011, Richard Samuels (CIS director and Ford International Professor of Political Science) encouraged incoming freshmen to explore "the many opportunities MIT provides to make sure that you step boldly and intelligently out into the global marketplace of ideas." Samuels is "quintessentially MIT," noted President Susan Hockfield in her introduction, because his work focuses on the application of knowledge to global issues. Samuels is founding director of the MIT-Japan program (the nation's first center of applied international studies), which spawned MIT's International Science and Technology Initiatives (MISTI)—a cornerstone international education program at MIT. Read more on Samuels' talk at MIT news.


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Japan Coast Guard, Foreign Policy and Pax Mercatoria

The Center's "Audit of the Conventional Wisdom" series presents the following essays: "'New Fighting Power!' for Japan?" by Richard Samuels (director of CIS and Ford International Professor of Political Science); "Is the Foreign Policy Process Working?" by John Tirman (executive director of CIS and principal research scientist); and "Pax Mercatoria: Does Economic Interdependence Bring Peace," by P. R. Goldstone (PhD candidate in the political science department at MIT). The Audits tour the horizon of conventional wisdoms that define U. S. foreign policy, and puts them to the test of data and history. To view all Audit essays, visit our Audit subsite.


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New Book on Global Economy

"Regulating Capital: Setting Standards for the International Financial System," a new book by David A. Singer, analyzes the complexities of global finance, describing how political pressures affect international regulation. ".Singer has produced the best account to date of the political dynamics that produce success and failure in this crucial domain," writes a critic. "Regulating Capital" is available now at Cornell University Press. Singer is assistant professor of political science at MIT and an affiliate of CIS.


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SSP Student Receives Fulbright Scholarship

Sarah Zukerman, a PhD candidate in the political science department and a member of the CIS Security Studies program, is one of six MIT graduate students awarded Fulbright scholarships for the academic year 2007-2008. Zukerman will travel to Colombia on a Fulbright grant and a Social Science Research Council grant. While there, she will examine Colombia's demobilization and reintegration programs and their effectiveness in curbing guerrilla violence. This research (which is also supported by a grant from the National Science Foundation) will form the basis of her PhD dissertation.


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New Book on Japan and the Future of East Asia

"Securing Japan," a new book by CIS director Richard Samuels, is praised as a "definitive assessment of Japanese security policy and its implications for the future of East Asia." Samuels places today's "Japanese debates about strategy in a broad historical context to 'connect the ideological dots' of national discourse," cites a review in Asia Policy. "Securing Japan" is available now through Cornell University Press. Samuels is a Ford International Professor of Political Science and the founding director of the MIT Japan program.


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New Book on U.S. and Developing Countries

In "Escape from Empire", Alice Amsden compares the attitudes and outcomes of America's relationship with the developing world during two eras—pre-Reagan and post. Described in the book as 'heaven' and 'hell' (respectively), Amsden provides a sound argument for a return to more sensible policies. Amsden is a Barton T. Weller Professor of Political Economy in the Department of Urban Studies and Planning and a scholar in the Center for International Studies at MIT.


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Washington Wants More Troops?

Washington's call to add more troops to fight terrorism is illogical, argues Benjamin Friedman in a recent "Audit" publication. Still, the proposal has received strong bipartisan support and is likely to be signed into law this year. Friedman elucidates the problems with this strategy and suggests another approach in his essay, "Fewer Missions, Not More Troops." Friedman is a PhD candidate in the Department of Political Science and a member of the Center's Security Studies Program at MIT. The "Audit of the Conventional Wisdom" publication series tours the horizon of conventional wisdoms that define U. S. foreign policy, and puts them to the test of data and history. To view all Audit essays, visit the Audit subsite.


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CIS Thanks Donors for Generous Support

The close of the fiscal year last week reminds us to thank our donors, who make the many programs of the Center possible with their support. The Center has endowments from the Starr Foundation and Japan's Foreign Ministry, which are particularly important to our financial security, and from Robert Wilhelm, whose large gift supports visiting fellowships. A number of corporations, foundations, and public institutions support the international education program of MISTI, and its web site has these many supporters listed. The Security Studies Program is supported significantly by grants from the Carnegie Corporation of New York, the MacArthur Foundation, the Smith Richardson Foundation, the Frankel Foundation, and the Rockefeller Brothers Fund. The National Science Foundation supports the Program on Emerging Technologies. The Jerusalem 2050 project received in 2006-07 grants from the Graham Foundation, the Boston Foundation, and a particularly generous gift from MIT graduate Jeff Silverman. Sizable gifts from an alumni family supports the work of the Persian Gulf Initiative, as do grants from Open Society Institute and the Rubin Foundation. The Audits of Conventional Wisdom have earned grants from the Rockefeller Brothers Fund, the HKH Foundation, and the Deer Creek Foundation. The Program on Human Rights and Justice received new research support this year from the Omidyar Network. There were other institutional grants, and several individuals donated anonymously. To all our supporters, we send our deep appreciation for your confidence and generosity.



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Australian Journalist Named Neuffer Fellow

Sally Sara, an anchor and senior reporter for the Australian Broadcasting Corporation, will become the Center's 2007-2008 Elizabeth Neuffer Fellow. At ABC, Sara worked from Africa as a foreign correspondent, reporting on topics such as human rights abuses in Darfur and Zimbabwe, child soldiers in Liberia, AIDS orphans in Lesotho and mutilation of women in Uganda. Sara has also written a book on African women, GoGo Mama, which will be published in July. She will join CIS in September and will have opportunities to work at the Boston Globe and the New York Times. The Elizabeth Neuffer Fellowship is awarded to female journalists who have a demonstrated interest in covering human rights and social justice. It is named for Elizabeth Neuffer, a Globe reporter who was killed on assignment in Iraq in 2003. Press Release.



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SSP Alumnus Receives Lucian Pye Award

Chikako Kawakatsu Ueki, a Security Studies program alumnus, was the winner of this year's Lucian Pye Award for best dissertation in political science. Ueki recently assumed a tenured position at Waseda University in Tokyo. Waseda is one of the major universities in Japan and has produced five prime ministers. Chikako teaches international relations and security at the Graduate School of Asia-Pacific Studies. Click here to read more.



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MISTI Sends Record Number of Students Abroad

More than 270 MIT students will engage in hands-on learning experiences abroad this year through MISTI-the Center's International Education program. The students will intern or conduct research with leading companies and labs around the world, while 43 students will participate in workshops abroad with MISTI partner companies. To learn more about how you can expand the borders of your MIT education, visit MISTI's Country Programs web site.





 
Massachusetts Institute of Technology