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IRG-II Highlights

The figure illustrates that pushing on a single gel (above left) results in chemical signal transmission to neighboring gels. The graph shows that the signal – visible as the amplitude of the gel color -- travels from left to right, and then splits at the "T" junction, with no decay in the signal amplitude. This effectively doubles the signal output, and offers a new design for pressure-sensing networks and devices.

Oscillating Gel Networks: Once Activated With Pressure, Can Communicate With Each Other Via Chemical Signaling

MIT MRSEC researchers have shown that mechanical and chemical signaling networks can be engineered in polymer gels. This is the first synthetic version of what biological cells and tissues do naturally: sense mechanical load and transmit that information via chemical signals. In this process, a mechanical compression triggers an oscillating change in gel color and shape that is transmitted to neighboring gels.

K. Van Vliet

 

 

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