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Yang Shao-Horn

Yang Shao-Horn (邵阳)

W.M. Keck Professor of Energy
Professor of Mechanical Engineering
Professor of Materials Science and Engineering
77 Massachusetts Ave
Rm 3-334
Cambridge, MA 02139
(617)-253-2259

Research and Teaching Interests

  • Electrochemical Energy Conversion and Storage Technologies
  • Photoelectrocatalysis of O2 and CO2
  • Nanostructured Materials for Lithium Storage

Select Peer Reviewed Publications

Honors and Awards

  • 2018, Member of National Academy of Engineering
  • 2017, Fellow of The Electrochemical Society
  • 2016, ECS Battery Research Award
  • 2016, Thomson Reuters Highly Cited Researcher
  • 2015, W. M. Keck Professorship of Energy
  • 2015, Thomson Reuters Highly Cited Researcher
  • 2014, AAAS Fellow
  • 2013, Research Award from the International Battery Association
  • 2011, Gail E. Kendall Chair of Mechanical Engineering
  • 2008, Tajima Prize of the International Society of Electrochemistry
  • 2008, Charles W. Tobias Young Investigator Award of The Electrochemical Society

Select Professional Activities and Service

  • Energy and Environmental Science, Advisory Board (2011-)
  • ChemElectroChem, Advisory Board (2012-)
  • Journal of Physical Chemistry, Advisory Board (2014-)

Postdoctoral Associates

Bin Cai
Bin Cai
Postdoctoral Associate since 2017
Ph.D. Physical Chemistry, TU Dresden, Germany
Research: Electrocatalysis
Nenian Charles
Nenian Charles
Postdoctoral Associate since 2017
Ph.D. Materials Science and Engineering, Drexel University
Research: First principles modeling of complex oxides for electrochemical applications
Botao Huang
Botao Huang
Postdoctoral Associate since 2015
Ph.D. Chemical and Process Engineering, University of Lorraine
Research: Thermogalvanic and thermoelectric
Mingjun Huang
Mingjun Huang
Postdoctoral Associate since 2016
Ph.D. Polymer Science, the University of Akron
Research: Li-air battery
Chao-Yu Li
Chao-Yu Li
Postdoctoral Associate since 2018
Ph.D. Physical Chemistry, Xiamen University, China
Research: Spectroelectrochemistry
Jeffrey Lopez
Jeffrey Lopez
Postdoctoral Associate since 2018
Ph.D. Chemical Engineering, Stanford University
Research: Electrode-Electrolyte Interface for Polymer Electrolytes
Sokseiha Muy
Sokseiha Muy
Postdoctoral Associate since 2018
Ph.D. Materials Science and Engineering, MIT
Research: Electrodes/Electrolytes interfaces
Bo Qiao
Bo Qiao
Postdoctoral Associate since 2017
Ph.D. Chemistry, Indiana University with Prof. Amar H. Flood
Research: Li+ conducting polymers
Ryoichi Tatara
Ryoichi Tatara
Postdoctoral Associate since 2017
Ph.D. Materials Science and Engineering, Yokohama National University, Japan
Research: Li-air and Li-ion batteries
Shuai Yuan
Shuai Yuan
Postdoctoral Associate since 2018
Ph.D. Inorganic Chemistry, Texas A&M University
Research: Electrocatalysis
Yunguang Zhu
Yunguang Zhu
Postdoctoral Associate since 2017
Ph.D. Materials Science and Engineering, National University of Singapore
Research: Flow battery

Visiting Researchers

Livia Giordani
Prof. Livia Giordano
Visiting professor since 2013
Assistant Professor, University of Milano-Bicocca, Italy

Ph.D. Materials Science, University of Milano-Bicocca, Italy
Research: Theoretical modeling of oxide materials, oxide/water and oxide/metal interfaces

Karsten Reuter
Prof. Karsten Reuter
Visiting professor since 2018
Professor, Technische Universität München, Germany

Ph.D. Theoretical Physics, University Erlangen-Nürnberg
Research: Quantitative multiscale modeling of materials properties and functions

Graduate Students

Karthik Akkiraju
Karthik Akkiraju
Graduate Student since 2015
B.Tech(Hons.)/M.Tech, Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Madras
Research: CO oxidation
Shuting Feng
Shuting Feng
Graduate Student since 2015
B.S. Chemical Engineering, University of Delaware
Research: Li-air battery
Jonathan Hwang
Jonathan Hwang
Graduate Student since 2014
B.S. Chemical Engineering, Yale University
Research: Electrocatalysis
Pinar Karayaylali
Pinar Karayaylali
Graduate Student since 2014
B.S. Mechanical Engineering, Bilkent University, Turkey
Research: Electrochemical interfaces
Graham Michael Leverick
Graham Michael Leverick
Graduate Student since 2016
B.S./M.S. Mechanical Engineering, University of Manitoba, Canada
Research: Li-air battery
Jaclyn Rose Lunger
Jaclyn Rose Lunger
Graduate Student since 2017
B.S. Materials Science and Engineering, Cornell University
Research: electrocatalysis
Thaneer Malai Narayanan
Thaneer Malai Narayanan
Graduate Student Since 2016
B.Eng. Mechanical Engineering, Keio University, Japan
Research: Flow battery
Jiayu Peng
Jiayu Peng
Graduate Student Since 2017
B.S. Applied Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, China
Research: Electrocatalysis
Reshma Rao
Reshma Rao
Graduate Student since 2014
M.Eng. Mechanical Engineering, University of Southampton, UK
Research: Electrocatalysis
Seungchan Ryu
Seungchan Ryu
Graduate Student since 2017
B.S. Materials Science and Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, South Korea
M.S. Materials Science and Engineering, Seoul National University, South Korea
Research: Solid-state battery
Jame Sun
Jame Sun
Graduate Student since 2017
B.ASc. Mechanical Engineering, University of Waterloo, Ontario, Canada
Research: Thermogalvanics
Yang Yu
Yang Yu
Graduate Student since 2016
B.S. Materials Science and Engineering, Manufacturing and Design Engineering, Northwestern University
Research: Li-ion battery
Yirui Zhang
Yirui Zhang
Graduate Student since 2017
B.S. Mechanical Engineering, Tsinghua University, China
Research: Electrode/Electrolyte interfaces

Visiting Students

Kuei-Lin Chan
Kuei-Lin Chan
Visiting student since April 2018
Currently a Ph.D. candidate in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Tsing Hua University, Taiwan
B.S. Materials Science and Engineering, National Tsing Hua University, Taiwan
Research: Photocatalysis
Kakuya Ueda
Kakuya Ueda
Visiting student since July 2018
Currently a Ph.D. candidate in the Department of Applied Chemistry, Nagoya University, Japan
B.Eng./M.Eng. Engineering, Applied Chemistry, Nagoya University, Japan
Research: Hydrocarbon oxidation
Janet Nienhuis
Janet Nienhuis
Visiting student since September 2018
BSc. Industrial Engineering, MSc. Energy Science, Utrecht University, Geosciences
Research: Lithium-air batteries

Undergraduate Students

Averey Chan
Averey Chan
UROP 2018
Research: Electrode/electrolyte interface stability in Li-ion batteries

Retired members

Marj Joss
Marj Joss
Academic Administrative Assistant

PhD graduated

Dongwook Lee
Dongwook Lee
Postdoctoral Research
Sokseiha Muy
Sokseiha Muy
Postdoctoral Research at MIT
Tom Batcho
Thomas Batcho
Graduate Student since 2011
Chris Bachman
John Christopher Bachman
Assistant Professor
Califorina State University, Los Angeles
Joseph Elias
Joseph Elias
Postdoctoral Research at Harvard University
Alex Binghong Han
Alex Binghong Han
Postdoctoral Research Associate at Argonne National Laboratory
Wesley Hong
Wesley Hong
Amazon
David Kwabi
David Kwabi
Postdoctoral Research at Harvard University
Kelsey Stoerzinger
Kelsey Stoerzinger
Pauling Postdoctoral fellow at PNNL
Koffi Pierre Claver Yao
Koffi Pierre Claver Yao
Postdoctoral Research Associate at Argonne National Laboratory
Ethan Crumlin
Ethan Crumlin
ALS Postdoctoral Fellow
Lawrence Berkeley National Lab

Gerardo Jose la O'
Gerardo Jose la O'

Manager
Primus Power, California

Jonathon Harding
Jonathon Harding
Exponent
Jungik Kim
Jungik Kim
Hyundai Motors

Yi-Chun Lu
Yi-Chun Lu
Assistant Professor
Chinese University of Hong Kong

Dongkyu Lee
Dongkyu Lee
Assistant Professor
Mechanical Engineering, University of South Carolina
Seung Woo Lee
Seung Woo Lee
Assistant Professor
Mechanical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology
Wenchao Sheng
Wenchao Sheng
Postdoctoral Researcher
Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of Delaware

Jin Suntivich
Jin Suntivich
HUCE Fellow
Harvard University

Assistant Professor in Materials Science/Engineering (2013)
Cornell University

Betar Gallant
Betar Gallant
Assistant Professor
Mechanical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Postdoctoral Associates

Juan Corchado García
Juan Corchado García
Postdoctoral Associate April 2017-2018
Ph.D. Analytical Chemistry, University of Puerto Rico – Río Piedras
Soo Kim
Soo Kim
Research Engineer, Robert Bosch Research and Technology Center
Ph.D. Materials Science and Engineering, Northwestern University
Denis Kuznetsov
Denis Kuznetsov
Postdoctoral Associate, ETH Zürich
Ph.D. Inorganic chemistry, Lomonosov Moscow State University
Kwan W. Tan
Kwan W. Tan
SMART Postdoctoral Associate
Ph.D. Materials Science and Engineering, Cornell University
Michal Tulodziecki
Michal Tulodziecki
Research scientist, Holst Centre
Katherine Phillips
Katherine Phillips
Postdoctoral researcher, Chemical Engineering, MIT
Manuel Kolb
Manuel Kolb
Postdoctoral research fellow, Chemical Engineering, Stanford University
Daniele Perego
Daniele Perego
Hao Hsun Chang
Hao Hsun Chang
Xiao (Renshaw) Wang
Xiao (Renshaw) Wang
Division of Physics and Applied Physics, Assistant Professor, NTU
Nir Pour
Nir Pour

Sayed Yousse Nagy
Sayed Youssef Sayed Nagy
Chemistry Department, Faculty of Science, Cairo University, Giza, Egypt.
Don-Hyung Ha
Don-Hyung Ha
Assistant Professor
Chung-Ang University, South Korea
Magali Gauthier
Magali Gauthier
Commissariat à l'énergie atomique et aux énergies alternatives (CEA)
Marcel Risch
Marcel Risch
University of Göttingen
Zhenxing Feng
Zhenxing Feng
Postdoctoral Associate
JCESR, Argonne National Lab
David Fenning
David Fenning
Assistant Professor
University of San Diego
Reza Kavian
Reza Kavian

 

Postdoctoral Associate
Georgia Institute of Technology
Sungjin Ahn
Sungjin Ahn

 

Scientist
Samsung Advanced Institute of Technology (SAIT), South Korea
Hye Ryung Byon
Hye Ryung Byon

 

Group Leader
RIKEN, Japan
Christopher Earl Carlton
Christopher Earl Carlton
Scientist
Samsung

 

Shuo Chen
Shuo Chen

Research Assistant Professor of Physics
University of Houston

Alexis Grimaud
Alexis Grimaud

CNRS Scientist in theoretical chemistry
Collège de France

Susumu Imashuku
Susumu Imashuku

 

Assistant Professor
Kyoto University

Junhyung Kim
Junhyung Kim

 

Scientist
SK Energy, South Korea

Yong-Tae Kim
Yong-Tae Kim

 

Associate Professor of Energy Systems
Pusan National University, South Korea

Website

Serkan Naci Koc
Serkan Naci Koc

Assistant Professor
Istanbul University, Turkey

Sundeep Kumar
Sundeep Kumar

Scientist
John Welch Tech. Center, GE, Bangalore

Youngmin Lee
Youngmin Lee

 

Postdoctoral Associate
NIST

Yueh-Lin Lee
Yueh-Lin Lee
NETL ORISE Research Fellow
National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL)
Tian Ming
Tian Ming

 

Postdoctoral Associate,

Department of Physics, The Chinese University of Hong Kong

Postdoctoral Fellow

Research Laboratory of Electronics MIT



Eva Mutoro
Eva Mutoro

 

Scientist
BASF, Germany

Lei Wang
Lei Wang

 

Scientist
Robert Bosch, China
Zhichuan Xu
Zhichuan Xu

 

Assistant Professor
Nanyang Technical University


Naoaki Yabuuchi
Naoaki Yabuuchi

 

Associate Professor
Department of Green and Sustainable Chemistry
Tokyo Denki University, Japan

Bilge Yildiz
Bilge Yildiz

 

Assistant Professor of Nuclear Engineering
MIT

Website

Masters Students

Anjuli Appapillai
Anjuli Appapillai
Masters Student
Elisa Alonso
Elisa Alonso
Masters Student
Anne Clemencon
Anne Clemencon
Masters Student
Areva, France
Theodore Golfinopoulos
Theodore Golfinopoulos
Masters Student
John Paul Kurpiewski
John Paul Kurpiewski
Masters Student
Raytheon, MA, USA
Chris Kuryak
Chris Kuryak
Master's Student
Hayley Han Li
Hayley Han Li
Masters Student
Morgan Stanley
Patrick Alan Linford
Patrick Alan Linford
Masters Student
West Point
Kevin May
Kevin May
Master's Student
Graduate student in group of Alexie Kolpak at MIT

Simcha Singer
Simcha Singer
Masters Student

Undergraduate Students

Pedro Acosta De Leon
Pedro Acosta De Leon
UROP 2018
Research: Effect of lithium halide species as mediators in lithium-oxygen batteries
Stefan Wan
Stefan Wan
UROP 2018
Research: Na-air and Li-ion batteries
Babatunde Ogunlade
Babatunde Ogunlade
UROP 2017
Research: Oxidation of noxious gases with heterogeneous catalysis
Luke Soule
Luke Soule
UROP 2017
Research: Decomposition of noxious gases with oxide catalysts
Ali Badr
Ali Badr
UROP 2016
Research: Semi-solid flow cell
Ximena Hasbach
Ximena Hasbach
UROP 2016
Research: Vanadium redox flow battery

Visiting Professors

Kaoru Dokko
Prof. Kaoru Dokko
Visiting Professor 2015
Associate Professor, Yokohama National University, Japan
Website
Jinwoo Lee
Prof. Jinwoo Lee
Visiting Professor 2015
Associate Professor in Chemical Engineering, POSTECH, South Korea
Website
Ifan Stephens
Prof. Ifan Stephens
Peabody Visiting Professor 2015
Associate Professor at the Department of Physics, Technical University of Denmark (DTU)
Website
Hubert Gasteiger
Hubert Gasteiger
Visiting Professor, 2009
Professor
Technical University Munich, Germany
Website
Robert F. Savinell
Robert F. Savinell
Visiting Professor
Professor of Chemical Engineering
Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH
Website
Dong Ha Kim
Dong Ha Kim
Visiting Scholar 2013
Faculty at Ewha Womans University, Department of Chemistry and Nano Science
Website
Saif Saeed Al Mheiri
Prof. Saif Saeed Al Mheiri
Visiting Professor 2014
Assistant professor, Masdar Institute - Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates

Visiting Scientists

Judith J. van Gorp
Dr. Judith J. van Gorp
Visiting scientist 2017 - 2018
Research scientist DSM - MIT.nano; DSM, Geleen, The Netherlands & MIT.nano, Cambridge, MA, USA

Yu Katayama
Yu Katayama
Visiting Scholar April 2016 - Dec 2017
Assistant professor, Yamaguchi University, Japan
Kei Hasegawa
Kei Hasegawa

 

Research Associate
University of Tokyo
Tadashi Kawaguchi
Tadashi Kawaguchi
Visting Scholar
Scott Donne
Scott Donne
Visiting Scientist 2010
Newcastle University, Australia
Website
George Marnellos
George Marnellos
Visiting Scientist
Assistant Professor in Mechanical Engineering
University of Western Macedonia, Greece
Paulo Ferreira
Paulo Ferreira
Visiting Scientist, 2005
Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering
University of Texas, Austin TX

Website
Birger Horstmann
Birger Horstmann
Visiting Scholar
Ph.D. Department of Physics, Technical University of Munich
Research: Modeling of electrochemical systems
Kai Wang
Kai Wang
Visiting Scholar
SMART-LEES postdoc, Singapore
Yasuhiro Tsukada
Yasuhiro Tsukada

 

Research Associate

Visiting Students

Alexander Tygesen
Alexander Tygesen
Visiting student since April 2018
Currently a Ph.D. candidate in the Department of Energy Conservation and Storage, Technical Unversity of Denmark, Denmark
Msc Physics and Nanotechnology, Technical University of Denmark, Denmark
Research: Li-ion battery
Thomas Vagn Hogg
Thomas Vagn Hogg
Visiting Student since July 2017
Currently a PhD student in the SurfCat group in Department of Physics, Technical University of Denmark (DTU), Denmark
B.Sc./M.Sc Chemistry, DTU, Denmark
Research: Electrocatalytic reduction of CO and CO2 to fuels and chemicals
Claudie Roy
Claudie Roy
Visiting Student since September 2017
Currently a PhD student at the Technical University of Denmark, Denmark
M.S. Energy and Materials Science, INRS-EMT, Canada
B.S. Chemistry, Université de Sherbrooke, Canada
Research: Electrocatalysis
Jiaoyang Li
Jiaoyang Li
Visiting Student since September 2016
M.Eng Materials Science and Engineering, currently a PhD candidate in Chemical Engineering, Tsinghua University, China
Research: Lithium battery
Robert Morasch
Robert Morasch
Kento Kimura
Kento Kimura
Visiting Student in 2016 and 2017
Aya Adel Saleh Elsayed
Aya Adel Saleh Elsayed
Visiting Student in 2016
Roland Jung
Roland Jung
Visiting Student in 2016
Ph.D. student in the group of Prof. Hubert A. Gasteiger at Technische Universität München
Paula Sebastian Pascual
Paula Sebastian Pascual
Visiting Student in 2016
Ph.D. student in Electrochemistry, Universidad de Alicante
Rameech N McCormack
Rameech N McCormack
Visiting Student in 2016
Ryoichi Tatara
Ryoichi Tatara
Visiting Student 2015
Ph.D. student in the group of Prof. Watanabe and Prof. Dokko at Yokohama National University, Japan
Musbaudeen O. Bamgopa
Musbaudeen O. Bamgopa
Visiting Student 2015
Ph.D. student in the Electrochemistry group of Prof. Saif Saeed Al Mheiri, Masdar Institute of Science and Technology, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates
Seonggyu Lee
Seonggyu Lee
Visiting Student 2015
Ph.D. student in the group of Prof. Jinwoo Lee at POSTECH, South Korea
Milind Gadre
Milind Gadre
Visiting Student

Ph.D. student at U. Wisconsin - Madison with Prof. Dane Morgan

Yuki Orikasa
Yuki Orikasa

 

Visiting Student
Assistant Professor in the Office of Society Acedemia Collaboration for Innovation
Kyoto University, Japan
Yuvraj Birdja
Yuvraj Birdja

 

Visiting Student
Anastasia Permyakova
Anastasia Permyakova

 

Visiting Student
Yoon Hee Jang
Yoon Hee Jang
Visiting Student 2013
Niels Bendtsen Halck
Niels Bendtsen Halck
Visiting Student 2014
Ivana Hasa
Ivana Hasa
Visiting Student 2014
Carole Martin-Hamka
Carole Martin-Hamka
Visiting Student 2014
Roberta Verrelli
Roberta Verrelli
Visiting Student 2014
Philipp Jaeker
Philipp Jäker
Visiting Student 2014
Julius Scholz
Julius Scholz
Visiting Student 2014
Kentaro Yamamoto
Kentaro Yamamoto
Visiting Student 2014-2015
Alessandro Boni
Alessandro Boni
Visiting Student 2015

ACS-alum-2018
EEL members and alumni reunion at ACS Boston, Aug 2018.
Yagi-2018

Prof. Shunsuke Yagi's seminar on Aug 7, 3 - 4 pm, in Room 3-350.

Abstract: Oxygen electrochemical reactions are incredibly important in industrial fields. It is required to impose an extra voltage (overvoltage or overpotential) corresponding to the activation energy to make the reactions proceed at a practical rate. The overpotential causes a vast energy loss, side reactions, and the degradation of electrode materials; an appropriate catalyst is essential to reduce the overpotential as much as possible. Valuable noble metals and noble metal oxides have mainly been used as catalysts. Drs. Yagi and Yamada discovered a quadruple perovskite oxide CaCu3Fe4O12 that shows an extremely high catalytic activity for the oxygen evolution reaction. Furthermore, they clarified the reaction mechanism on the surface of the quadruple perovskite oxides, and paved the path to the catalysis application for a new materials group. In this presentation, the structural effects on the activity of the electrochemical catalysts will be discussed.

Prof. Shunsuke Yagi's biography: Dr. Shunsuke Yagi is an Associate Professor at Institute of Industrial Science, the University of Tokyo (Japan), and heads a small research group as a principal investigator. He is also a Visiting Scientist of Department of Materials Science and Engineering (Prof. Rupp’s group), Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) since July 2018, and has collaborated on sulfide electrochemistry with Prof. Antoine Allanore from MIT with the support of the ULVAC-Hayashi MISTI Seed Fund since 2017. He received his B.S. (2002), M.S. (2004), and Ph.D. (2007) degrees in Materials Science and Engineering from Kyoto University (Japan). After his graduation, he was affiliated as Assistant Professor at Kyoto University (2007–2011), Special Lecturer at Osaka Prefecture University (2011–2016), and Associate Professor at the University of Tokyo (2016–present). His current research focuses specifically on electrochemical energy conversion systems/materials such as rechargeable batteries using multivalent ions and electrochemical catalysts for oxygen evolution and reduction reactions.

Watanabe-2018

Prof. Masayoshi Watanabe's lecture on Aug 24, 3 - 4:30 pm, in Room 3-370.

Abstract: Certain molten solvates of Li salts can be regarded as solvate ionic liquids (SILs). A typical example is equimolar mixtures of glymes (G3: triglyme and G4: tetraglyme) and Li[TFSA]([TFSA]=[NTf2]) ([Li(glyme)][TFSA]). The amount of free glyme estimated by Raman spectroscopy and MD simulation is a trace in [Li(glyme)]X with perfluorosulfonylamide-type anions such as [TFSA]-, and thereby can be regarded as solvate ionic liquids. The activity of free glyme in the glyme-Li salt mixtures evaluated by measuring EMF of the concentration cells drastically diminishes at a higher concentration of Li salt, leading to a drastic increase in the electrode potential. Unlike conventional electrolytes, the solvation of Li+ by the glyme forms stable and discrete solvate ions ([Li(glyme)]+) in the solvate ionic liquids. In this lecture the importance of free solvent activity for the transport properteis and electrochemical reactions of the SILs and their polymer electrolytes will be discussed.

Prof. Masayoshi Watanabe's biography: Masayoshi Watanabe is a Professor of Yokohama National University (YNU). He received his B.S. (1978), M.S. (1980), and Ph.D. (1983) degrees from Waseda University. After a visiting scientist with Professor Royce W. Murray at University of North Carolina (1988–1990), he joined YNU in 1992 and was promoted to a full Professor in 1998. He received the Award of the Society of Polymer Science, Japan in 2006, ISPE Galileo Galilei Award in 2014, the Award of The Electrochemical Society of Japan (ECSJ Takei Award) in 2016, ECS Max Bredig Award in 2016, and the Commendation for Science and Technology by the Minister of the MEXT of Japan in 2017. He is now serving as President of ECSJ and Dean of graduate school of engineering science, YNU. Prof. Watanabe's research interest has been mainly concerned with “ionics” and “nano-structured materials”. Ionics has become an important scientific area for the realization of key materials for advanced electrochemical devices, which supports a sustainable society. He is one of research leaders in the fields of ionic liquids and polymer electrolytes in the world. Recent research activity has been expanded to nano-structured materials, including block copolymer assembly in ionic liquids. He has published 386 original research papers and 190 books and reviews in these and relating fields. Number of Citations > 25,000, h-index = 84.

RedSox-2018
EEL Red Sox game on Aug 21, 2018.
180819Symposium

Frontiers in Catalysis and Electrocatalysis – Mini Symposium on Aug 19, 10am - 1 pm, in Room 3-350.

Part 1 Catalysis and Electrocatalysis for Chemical Transformation, by Professor Robert Schlögl

Robert Schlögl studied chemistry and completed his PhD on graphite intercalation compounds at the Ludwig Maximilians University in Munich (1982). After postdoctoral stays at Cambridge and Basle he carried out his habilitation under the supervision of Professor Ertl (Nobel Laureate) at Fritz Haber Institute in Berlin (1989). Later he accepted the call for a Full Professorship of Inorganic Chemistry at Frankfurt University. In 1994 he was appointed his current position as Director at the Fritz Haber Institute of the Max Planck Society in Berlin. In addition, in 2011 he was appointed Founding Director at the new Max Planck Institute for Chemical Energy Conversion in Mülheim a.d. Ruhr. He is an Honorary Professor at Technical University Berlin, Humboldt University Berlin, University Duisburg-Essen and Ruhr University Bochum. Robert Schlögl's research focuses primarily on the investigation of heterogeneous catalysts, with the aim to combine scientific with technical applicability as well as on the development of nanochemically-optimized materials for energy storage. The application of knowledge-based heterogeneous catalysis for large-scale chemical energy conversion summarizes his current research focus. He is author of more than 1,000 publications, gave more than 450 invited talks and lectures and is registered inventor of more than 20 patent families. He is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Chemistry, Tetelman Fellow and member of numerous international organizations. His research activities have been recognized with several national and international awards.

Part 2 Selectivity in C-H activation over metal oxides, by Dr. Annette Trunschke

Annette Trunschke completed her diploma thesis in 1986 at the Friedrich Schiller University Jena where she worked on the liquid-liquid extraction of copper. She then moved on to the Central Institute of Physical Chemistry in Berlin, Germany to pursue work on the activation of carbon monoxide on transition metal surfaces. She was the Alexander von Humboldt Postdoctoral Fellow at LMU Munich where she worked with Prof. H. Knözinger on FTIR spectroscopic characterization of silica supported rhodium catalysts. From 1997 to 2003 she was a research associate at the Institute of Applied Chemistry Berlin-Adlershof, Germany, following which she has been a group leader at the Department of Inorganic Chemistry at the Fritz Haber Institute of the Max Planck Society in Berlin, Germany. Her current research interests include heterogeneous catalysis and inorganic Chemistry, development of new synthetic approaches to catalytically active materials, precipitation and solvothermal synthesis, in situ monitoring of inorganic reaction steps during catalyst preparation and activation of n-alkanes over transition metal oxides.

Part 3 Refining First-Principles Photo-Electrocatalysis, by Professor Karsten Reuter

Karsten received his Doctoral Degree in Theoretical Physics from the University Erlangen- Nürnberg in 1998. After postdoctoral stays at the Fritz-Haber-Institut der Max-Planck-Gesellschaft in Berlin and the FOM-Institut for Atomic and Molecular Physics in Amsterdam, he headed an Independent Junior Research Group at the Fritz-Haber-Institut from 2005, combined with the position of a Privatdozent at the Free University Berlin. Since 2009 he holds the Chair of Theoretical Chemistry at the Technische Universität München (TUM), is an adjunct professor in the TUM Physics Department, and is affiliated to the TUM Catalysis Research Center. In 2014/15 he was a visiting professor at the Chemical Engineering Department of Stanford University. His research interests center on a quantitative multiscale modeling of materials properties and functions, in particular on linking predictive-quality quantum-mechanical electronic structure calculations with more coarse-grained statistical and continuum approaches. He has co-authored over 200 publications in this and related fields.

Part 4 Designer Catalysts: A Material-Centric Approach to the Energy Storage Challenge, by Professor Jin Suntivich

Jin Suntivich is an Assistant Professor in Materials Science and Engineering at Cornell University. He received his Sc.D. in Materials Science and Engineering from MIT with Prof. Yang Shao-Horn and B.S. in Materials Science and Engineering from Northwestern University with Prof. Mark Hersam. Prior to joining Cornell, he was a Ziff Environmental Postdoctoral Fellow at Harvard University with Prof. Eric Mazur and Prof. Cynthia Friend. Jin’s research focuses on the use of materials science concepts to study catalyst materials, particularly for electrochemical transformations of molecules that involve reactions of oxygen, water, and carbon dioxide. His program currently uses advanced deposition and self-assembly in connection with surface science methods and spectroscopy to study the mechanisms of electrochemical transformations. These studies are intended to test structure-property relation postulates and to create new strategies for identifying higher-performing materials for energy storage, catalysis, and photonics.

Part 5 MIT students present

KReuter-2018

Prof. Karsten Reuter's lecture series in Room 3-350

Lecture 1 (Aug 6 1pm-2:30pm): (1) Introduction to multiscale modeling approaches (concurrent vs. hierarchical modeling), the first-principles basis, sensitivity analyses; (2) Concurrent approaches I: ab initio thermodynamics and the computational hydrogen electrode.

Lecture 2 (Aug 7 1pm-2:30pm): Concurrent approaches II: atomically resolved embedding (QM/MM, solid-state embedding, QM/Me), continuum embedding/implicit solvation.

Lecture 3 (Aug 13 10-11:30am): Hierarchical approaches: first-principles kinetic Monte Carlo (1p-kMC), 1p-kMC to computational fluid dynamics.

Lecture 4 (Aug 15 10-11:30am): New avenues: computational screening & machine learning within the multiscale modeling context.

Abstract: As in many other areas of materials science, modern computational science is becoming a key contributor in the quest to quantitatively understand the molecular-level mechanisms underlying the macroscopic phenomena in energy applications, which will ultimately enable a rational design of novel catalysts, energy suppliers and improved production strategies. Of particular relevance are modern multiscale modeling approaches that link the insights that modelling and simulation can provide across all relevant length and time scales. At the molecular level, first-principles electronic-structure calculations unravel the making and breaking of chemical bonds. At the mesoscopic scale, statistical simulations account for the interplay between all elementary processes involved in the catalytic cycle. At the macroscopic scale continuum theories yield the effect of heat and mass transfer, ultimately scaling up to a plant-wide simulation. When integrating these various levels of theory into one multiscale simulation, a key aspect is to maintain the predictive power provided by the underlying first-principles description. This dictates a stringent control of error propagation through the scales, as well as seamless matching approaches relying only on validated coupling parameters. In this lecture series I will survey a range of corresponding methodologies. I will highlight the concepts, present status and open challenges, drawing largely on application examples from our own research on surface catalysis and interfacial electrochemistry.

Dr. Reuter received his Doctoral Degree in Theoretical Physics from the University Erlangen-Nürnberg in 1998. After postdoctoral stays at the Fritz-Haber-Institut der Max-Planck-Gesellschaft in Berlin and the FOM-Institut for Atomic and Molecular Physics in Amsterdam, he headed an Independent Junior Research Group at the Fritz-Haber-Institut from 2005, combined with the position of a Privatdozent at the Free University Berlin. Since 2009 he holds the Chair of Theoretical Chemistry at the Technische Universität München (TUM), is an adjunct professor in the TUM Physics Department, and is affiliated to the TUM Catalysis Research Center. In 2014/15 he was a visiting professor at the Chemical Engineering Department of Stanford University. His research interests center on a quantitative multiscale modeling of materials properties and functions, in particular on linking predictive-quality quantum-mechanical electronic structure calculations with more coarse-grained statistical and continuum approaches. He has co-authored over 200 publications in this and related fields.

IMLB-2018
Graham and Yirui at CLS in Canada, June 2018.
IMLB-2018
EEL members and colleagues having a dinner party at IMLB in Kyoto, Japan, June 2018.

EEL's end-of-semester celebration! Congratulations to Dr. Tom Batcho, Dr. Seiha Muy, and Dr. Dongwook Lee for their successful thesis defenses!

ECS-retirement-2018
Ratko Adzic's retirement celebration at ECS in Seattle, May 2018.
ECS-dinner-2018
EEL members having dinner at ECS in Seattle, May 2018.
Ifan-March-2018

Prof. Ifan Stephens' lecture on March 30, 1 - 2:30 pm, in Room 3-270.

Abstract: Electrochemistry is set to play a critical role in the increased uptake of renewable energy. It turns out that the catalyst material at the electrode, i.e. the electrocatalyst, defines the efficiency of several important electrochemical reactions, including: (a) electrolysis for the storage of renewable electricity — which is inherently intermittent — in the form of fuels, such as hydrogen or alcohols. (b) fuel cells as a potentially zero emission source of power for automotive vehicles. (c) the green synthesis of valuable chemicals, such as H2O2. Using model investigations, my research has elucidated the factors that control electrocatalytic interfaces. On the basis of fundamental insight, we have discovered several new catalyst materials with unprecendented performance. In the contribution, I will focus on (i) O2 reduction, of relevance for fuel cells, aqueous metal air batteries and chemical synthesis and (ii) CO2 reduction for solar fuel production. We combine electrochemical measurements with electron microscopy, in-operando spectroscopy, ultra-high vacuum surface science methods and density functional theory calculations.

Prof. Ifan Stephens' biography: In July 2017, Ifan Stephens took up the position of a Senior Lecturer at Imperial College London. Prior to Imperial, he was at the Department of Physics at the Technical University of Denmark (DTU); he was first employed as a postdoctoral researcher, then as assistant professor and finally as associate professor and leader of the Electrocatalysis Group there. In 2015, the Department of Mechanical Engineering at MIT appointed Ifan as the Peabody Visiting Associate Professor.

Jian-March-2018

Prof. Ying Jiang's lecture on March 15, 1 - 2:30 pm, in Room 3-133.

Abstract: Interfacial water is ubiquitous in nature and plays an essential role in a broad spectrum of physics, chemistry, biology, energy and material sciences. One of the most fundamental issues is the characterization of H-bonding configuration formed on surfaces and H-atom transfer through hydrogen bonds. Ideally, attacking this problem requires the access to the internal degrees of freedom of water molecules, i.e. the directionality of OH bonds. However, it remains a great challenge due to the small size of hydrogen. In this talk, I will present our recent progress on the development of new-generation scanning probe microscopy/spectroscopy (SPM/S) with ultrahigh sensitivity and resolution, and its application to interfacial water. I will focus on how to achieve submolecular-resolution imaging and single-bond vibrational spectroscopy of single water molecules via controlling tip-water coupling. Those technical advances provide us unprecedented opportunity to identify the topology of H-bonding configuration, track the proton dynamics, and assess quantitatively the nuclear quantum effects (NQEs) of H bond [3,5]. The submolecular-level studies of ion hydration and transport will be also briefly introduced in the end .

Prof. Ying Jiang's biography: Ying Jiang received his Bachelor’s degree from Beijing Normal University in 2003 and his PhD from Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) in 2008. He has been a visiting scientist in Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH in Germany (2006-2007). After working as a Postdoctoral Associate in University of California, Irvine (2008-2010), he joined International Center for Quantum Materials, Peking University as a tenure-track assistant professor. He was promoted to associate professor with tenure in 2016 and full professor in 2018. He has published over 30 peer-reviewed papers, including 2 in Science, 1 in Nature, and 6 in Nature Journals. He has delivered over 40 invited talks (including 5 plenary talks) in a number of international conferences (ACS, APS, AVS, etc.). He was awarded Outstanding Young Scientist (2012), Cheung Kong Young Scholar (2016), Emerging Leaders (IOP, 2016), Distinguished Young Scholars of NSFC (2017). His research works were selected as Top-ten Progresses of Science and Technology of China (2016) and Top-ten Progresses of Basic Research of China (2017). He is an expert in advanced scanning probe microscopy and spectroscopy. His current interests are focused on the atomic-scale properties and ultrafast dynamics in single molecules and low-dimensional materials.

Nocera-March-2018

Prof. Daniel G. Nocera's lecture on March 14, 1:30 - 3 pm, in Room 3-133.

Abstract: Hybrid biological | inorganic (HBI) constructs have been created to use sunlight, air and water to accomplish carbon fixation and nitrogen fixation, thus enabling distributed and renewable fuels and crop production. The carbon fixation cycle begins with the artificial leaf, which was invented at MIT to accomplish the solar fuels process of natural photosynthesis – the splitting of water to hydrogen and oxygen using sunlight – under ambient conditions. To create the artificial leaf, self-healing oxidic catalysts were integrated with silicon by developing novel patterning techniques in a buried junction architecture. The property of self-healing catalysis allows water splitting to be accomplished under benign conditions and at neutral pH, thus allowing water splitting catalysis to be interfaced with engineered bioorganisms to convert carbon dioxide, along with the hydrogen produced from the catalysts of the artificial leaf, into biomass and liquid fuels, thus closing an entire artificial photosynthetic cycle. This HBI system, called the bionic leaf, operates at unprecedented solar-to-biomass (10.7%) and solar-to-liquid fuels (6.2%) yields, greatly exceeding the 1% yield of natural photosynthesis. Extending this approach, a renewable and distributed synthesis of fertilizer and ammonia have been achieved at ambient conditions by coupling solar-based water splitting to a nitrogen fixing bioorganism. The nitrogen reduction reaction proceeds at a turnover number of 3.1 × 109 per cell and operates without the need for a carbon feedstock (which is provided by CO2 from air). The bacterium is a living fertilizer, and increased crop yields of over 300% have been realized. These science discoveries set the stage for a storage mechanism for the large scale, distributed, deployment of solar energy and distributed food production and thus are particularly useful to the poor of the world, where large infrastructures for fuel and food production are not tenable.

Prof. Daniel G. Nocera's biography: Daniel G. Nocera is the Patterson Rockwood Professor of Energy at Harvard University. He is widely recognized in the world as a leading researcher in renewable energy and is the inventor of the artificial leaf and bionic leaf. He was the Henry Dreyfus Professor of Energy and was Director of the Solar Frontiers Center at MIT, and then in 2013 he moved to Harvard. Nocera has accomplished the solar fuels process of photosynthesis – the splitting of water to hydrogen and oxygen using light from neutral water, at atmospheric pressure and room temperature. He has performed this solar process at efficiencies of greater than 10%. The artificial leaf was named by Time magazine as Innovation of the Year for 2011. He has since elaborated this invention to accomplish a complete artificial photosynthetic cycle. To do so, he created the bionic leaf, which is a bio-engineered bacterium that uses the hydrogen from that artificial leaf and carbon dioxide from air to make biomass and liquid fuels. The bionic leaf, which was named by Scientific American and the World Economic Forum as the Breakthrough Technology for 2017, performs artificial photosynthesis that is ten times more efficient than natural photosynthesis. Extending this approach, Nocera has achieved a renewable and distributed synthesis of ammonia (and fertilizer) at ambient conditions by coupling solar-based water splitting to a nitrogen fixing bioorganism, which is powered by the hydrogen produced from water splitting. Nocera’s research contributions in renewable energy have been recognized by several awards, some of which include the Leigh Ann Conn Prize for Renewable Energy, Eni Prize, IAPS Award, Burghausen Prize, Elizabeth Wood Award and the United Nation’s Science and Technology Award and from the American Chemical Society the Inorganic Chemistry, Harrison Howe. Kosolapoff and Remsen Awards. He is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the U.S. National Academy of Sciences and the Indian Academy of Sciences. He was named as 100 Most Influential People in the World by Time Magazine and was 11th on the New Statesman’s list on the same topic, and he is a frequent guest on TV and radio and is regularly featured in print. Nocera has supervised 158 Ph.D. graduate and postdoctoral students, 67 of which have assumed faculty positions, published over 425 papers, given over 950 invited talks and 125 named lectureships. In 2008, Nocera founded Sun Catalytix, a company committed to developing energy storage for the wide-spread implementation of renewable energy. In August 2014, Lockheed Martin purchased the assets of Sun Catalytix, and now Sun Catalytix technology is being fast-tracked to commercialization under the new venture, Lockheed Martin GridStar™ Flow.

Hubert-March-2018

Prof. Hubert Gasteiger's lecture on March 9, 3:30 - 5 pm. in Room 3-370

Abstract: An important element in trying to reduce global CO2 emissions is the decarbonization of the transportation sector. A possible path towards this goal is the use of hydrogen as energy carrier for temporary large-scale energy storage and for powering fuel cell electric vehicles (FCEVs). Proton exchange membrane (PEM) based water electrolyzers and fuel cells are currently the most promising candidates for the generation of high-pressure hydrogen and for powering FCEVs. However, both technologies currently require excessive amounts of costly and supply-limited precious metals, which could restrict the large-scale implementation of PEM electrolyzers and fuel cells. After a brief review of the current technological and economic constraints for BEVs, this presentation will focus on the fuel cell materials/design options to reduce the amount of the costly and resource limited platinum catalyst. A substantial reduction of the amount of platinum in FCEVs hinges on the development and implementation of improved oxygen reduction catalysts in order to reach the <0.1 gPt/kW DOE target. While this was originally thought to require novel platinum based catalysts with a 10-fold higher mass activity (or Pt-free catalysts), it will be shown that recent advances in increasing the operating current density can also be a significant in the roadmap towards the <0.1 gPt/kW target. The final part of this presentation will examine the feasibility of the large-scale generation of renewable hydrogen by PEM water electrolysis, particularly in view of the required amount of the resource-limited iridium catalyst for the oxygen reduction reaction. The materials and design development challenges will be examined in view of our current understanding of the efficiency losses in PEM water electrolyzers.

Prof. Hubert Gasteiger's biography: Hubert Gasteiger received his Ph.D. in Chemical Engineering from UC Berkeley (1993) and held postdoctoral fellow positions at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (1994–1995) and Ulm University (1996–1998). Subsequently, as Technical Manager at the US-based fuel cell program of GM/Opel (1999-2007), he led the development of catalysts and membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs). In 2009, he held a Visiting Professorship at MIT with Prof. Yang Shao-Horn, and in 2010 he was appointed Chair of Technical Electrochemistry at the Chemistry Department of the Technical University of Munich, where his research focuses on the development of materials, electrodes, and diagnostics for fuel cells, electrolyzers, and batteries (www.tec.ch.tum.de). He served as editor of Wiley’s Handbook of Fuel Cells (2003 and 2009) and has published 150 refereed articles (h index 64), 15 book chapters, and 23 patents. He is Fellow of the Electrochemical Society (ECS), received the 2012 Grove Medal for fuel cell research, the 2015 David C. Grahame Award of the ECS, and the 2017 ECS Energy Technology Division Research Award.

EEL-female-alums-Nat-Mat-2018
EEL alumnae (Betar, Yi-Chun, Shirley, Bilge) spoke at the Nature Conference on Materials Electrochemistry: Fundamentals and Applications in InterContinental Shenzhen, China, January 13–15, 2018.
EEL alums reunion
EEL alums reunion at ECS 2017!
Kyoto-MIT Workshop
EEL members visitng Kyoto and attending the Kyoto-MIT workshop!
MIT Cambridge 100 years celebration
EEL members at the MIT Cambridge 100 Years Celebration!
EEL outing Oct 2016
EEL group outing in October 2016 - cruising the Boston Harbor!
EEL at ECS Hawaii 2016
EEL get together at the ECS meeting in Hawaii!
EEL at ISE2016
EEL get together at the ISE meeting in the Netherlands!
EEL graduates June 2016
New EEL doctors (June 2016)!
EEL at Fenway
EEL visits Fenway Park to watch the Red Sox win 9:1. Go Red Sox!
Ethan receives SSI Award 2015
Prof. Joachim Maier (left) presents the 3rd SSI Young Scientist Award to EEL alumni Ethan (right). Congratulations!.
ECS Greetings
EEL alumni Ethan, Yi-Chun, Hye-Ryung, Seung Woo, Hubert and Jin (left to right) sent greetings from ECS in Chicago.
Rensha's wedding ceremony
Huan Xu and Renshaw (middle) at their wedding ceremony.
Jonathon's defense party
Impressions from Jonathon's defense party.
Yang and Pierre discussing science
Yang and Pierre discuss science. BASF uses this picture to advertise the Science Symposium 2015.
Yang and EEL members featured on the BASF Creator Space page

Yang and EEL members outside the Stata Center. BASF uses this picture on its Creator Space page.
Yang and former group member Prof. Yuki Orikasa in Kyoto
Yang and former group member Professor Yuki Orikasa from the group of Professor Uchimoto at Kyoto University at the 55th Japan Battery symposium. Yuki served as the Conference Secretary and received the Battery Research Award from The Committee of Battery Technology, The Electrochemical Society of Japan.
Yang and former group member Dr. Hye Ryung's research in group in Kyoto
Yang and former group member Dr. Hye Ryung's research group from RIKEN at the 55th Japan Battery Symposium in Kyoto. November 2014.
Jin, Kevin, Kelsey and David at ISE 2014
Jin, Kevin, Kelsey and David (left to right) at ISE 2014
Kelsey and Wesley at ALS
Kelsey and Wesley at ALS
David mounting a flow cell arm at ALS
David mounting a flow cell arm at ALS
Congratulations 2012 Graduates Ethan Crumlin, Yi-Chun Lu and Jin Suntivich
Congratulations 2012 Graduates Ethan Crumlin, Yi-Chun Lu and Jin Suntivich
Ethan Crumlin successfully defends his thesis 04/25/2012
Ethan's Defense 04/25/12
EEL Group celebrates Yang's birthday
EEL Group at the beach

Jin Suntivich's photos of Graduation 2012