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21F.415: Germany and its European Context

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Syllabus

Examines the historical, political, and sociological forces that shape present-day Germany. Topics vary and may include: value changes in postwar society, coping with the legacy of the past, multiculturalism in Germany, change of gender roles, cultural differences between East and West after the unification, the role of environmentalism, the process of European integration, and Germany and its neighbors. Draws on current articles, texts and videos from newspapers, journals, the Web, and German TV. Integrates and contextualizes the first-hand experiences of German society. Taught in German. Prereq: 21F.404 or 21F.474. Can be repeated for credit. Prof. Nolden is from Wellesley College. Topic for Spring 2013: Crossing Boundaries: Competing Views on Contemporary Germany

Prereqs:  21F.404 or 21F.474



Topic for Spring 2013: Crossing Boundaries: Competing Views on Contemporary Germany

Thomas Nolden is a Visiting Professor from Wellesley College.

Where does Germany end and Europe begin? How do ethnic, regional, and national identities intersect with experiences of globalization, integration, and the construction of individual identities? Which visual forms and narrative styles does a new generation of artists use in order to articulate their diverse identities in present-day Germany?

In this course we will read, view, and discuss autobiographical and fictional accounts of authors, journalists, and film directors who have multiple perspectives on Germany in the 21st century (Fatih Akin, Katharina Hacker, Jana Hensel, Christian Kracht, Zafer Senoçak, Yoko Tawada, and others). Course materials will include a variety of media to allow students to develop a critical appreciation of the language employed by different writers and filmmakers. Reaction papers to individual texts and films will form the basis of a portfolio that students will present at the end of the semester.

Class to be conducted entirely in German.

Units: 3-0-9(U)

HASS-H

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