Richard Futrell

厦门


Hi. I am a Ph.D. student in Cognitive Science at MIT. My advisor is Ted Gibson. I got a BA and MA in Linguistics from Stanford University, where my advisor was Dan Jurafsky. I'm interested in explaining linguistic universals and variation in terms of facilitating efficient and robust communication.

Here's some (slightly out of date) information on how to run Self-Paced Reading studies over Amazon Mechanical Turk

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Papers

Richard Futrell, Kyle Mahowald, and Edward Gibson. Submitted. Large-Scale Evidence of Dependency Length Minimization in 34 Languages

Richard Futrell, Tina Hickey, Aldrin Lee, Eunice Lim, Elena Luchkina, and Edward Gibson. 2015. Cross-linguistic gestures reflect typological universals: A subject-initial, verb-final bias in speakers of diverse languages. Cognition 136: 215-221.

Stephanie Shih, Jason Grafmiller, Richard Futrell, and Joan Bresnan. 2012. Rhythm's role in the genitive construction choice in spoken English. In Rhythm in Phonetics, Grammar and Cognition, ed. Ralf Vogel and Ruben van de Vijver, in the series Trends in Linguistics. Studies and Monographs (TiLSM), Mouton.

Theses

Processing Effects of the Expectation of Informativity. Master's thesis with Hannah Rohde and Dan Jurafsky.

German Grammatical Gender as a Nominal Protection Device. Senior thesis with Dan Jurafsky and Michael Ramscar.

Presentations

Richard Futrell, Kyle Mahowald, and Edward Gibson. 2014. CLIQS: Crosslinguistic Investigations in Quantitative Syntax. Poster presented at AMLaP 2014.

* Richard Futrell, Kyle Mahowald, Steve Piantadosi, and Edward Gibson. 2014. Efficient Communication Forwards and Backwards. Poster presented at CUNY 2014.

* Richard Futrell, Tina Hickey, Aldrin Lee, Eunice Lim, Elena Luchkina, and Edward Gibson. 2014. Cross-linguistic gestures reflect typological universals: A subject-initial, verb-final bias in speakers of diverse languages. Paper presented at CUNY 2014.

* Richard Futrell and Hannah Rohde. 2012. Expecting the unexpected: how discourse expectations can reverse predictability effects in reading time. Poster presented at CUNY 2012.

* Richard Futrell and Michael Ramscar. 2012. German grammatical gender contributes to communicative efficiency. Presented at the 2012 Annual Meeting of the Linguistic Society of America, Portland.

* Richard Futrell and Michael Ramscar. 2011. German grammatical gender manages nominal entropy. Poster presented at the Workshop on Information-Theoretic Approaches to Linguistics, July, University of Colorado, Boulder. [abstract, poster]

* Michael Ramscar and Richard Futrell. 2011. The predictive function of prenominal adjectives. Poster presented at the Workshop on Information-Theoretic Approaches to Linguistics, July, University of Colorado, Boulder. [abstract, poster]

* Stephanie Shih, Jason Grafmiller, Richard Futrell, and Joan Bresnan. 2009. Rhythm's role in the genitive construction choice in spoken English. 31st Annual Meeting of the Deutsche Gesellschaft fur Sprachwissenschaft: Rhythm beyond the word. Osnabruck, Germany.

Laura Staum Casasanto, Richard Futrell, and Ivan A. Sag. 2009. Parallels between production and comprehension of multiple that: What's good for the goose... Poster presented at the 22nd Annual CUNY Conference on Sentence Processing. March. UC Davis. [draft poster]

Laura Staum Casasanto, Richard Futrell, and Ivan A. Sag. 2008. Extra complementizers increase syntactic predictability. Poster presented at the 14th Annual Conference on Architectures and Mechanisms for Language Processing. Cambridge, UK. [poster]

(* = presented in person)

Manuscripts

Richard Futrell and Sam Bowman. 2012. Measuring Amok. Term paper for Stanford CS224U: Natural Language Understanding.

Richard Futrell. 2012. And the Context Shall Make You Free: Bleaching as Blocking in a Discrimination Learning Model of Grammaticalization in the Critical Context. Term paper for Elizabeth Traugott's class on Constructionalization.

Richard Futrell. 2010. Predicting Gaps: Exploring Distributional Explanations for the Accessibility Hierarchy. Term paper.