The MIT Air-Sea Interaction Lab


 
 

The MIT Air-Sea Interaction Lab has been involved since 1999 in experimental investigations of drag and enthalpy transfer coefficients over the ocean at high wind speed.  The lab is also used for evaporation retardation experiments using molecular monolayers and other substances.

Origins of the various kinds of sea spray droplets.  Splash droplets arise where   wave crests spill at the site of whitecaps.  Most film and jet droplets are produced where bubbles rise and burst.  Spume droplets are torn directly from the crests of steep waves.


 

 
 
 

A description of the experimental apparatus, experimental methodology and the goals of the program can be found in the following links:
 

“EXPERIMENTAL INVESTIGATION OF AIR-SEA TRANSFER OF MOMENTUM AND ENTHALPY AT HIGH WIND SPEED” by
M. Alamaro, K. A. Emanuel, J. J. Colton, W. R. McGillis, and J. Edson.  25th Conference on Hurricanes and Tropical Meteorology, April 2002.
 

"Wind Wave Tank for Experimental Investigation of Momentum and Enthalpy Transfer from the Ocean Surface at High Wind Speed", A Thesis by M. Alamaro, May 2001.
 

“Hurricane Potential Intensity Theory”  By Kerry Emanuel.
 

“Feasibility Experiments into the Use of Hexadecanol for Hurricane Mitigation and the Planning and Construction of the Monolayer Evaporation Retardation Laboratory”, A Thesis by Yu-Lun Lawrence Hsin, June 2002.
 

"EYES ON THE STORMY SEASON, SCIENTISTS PLOT NEW DEFENSES AGAINST HURRICANES" By David L. Chandler, The Boston Globe August 23, 1999.
 
  "Experimental Investigation of Air-Sea Transfer of Momentum and Enthalpy at High Wind Speed" By Moshe Alamaro, Kerry A. Emanuel, Wade R. McGillis.  Reviewed by Boundary Layer Meteorology.

 

The Wind Wave Tank at the MIT Air-Sea Interaction Lab

 

Click on the image to see a larger version

 

 

Faculty, Research and Technical Staff:
 
 

Kerry Emanuel 

Moshe Alamaro 

David Bono

 

 

 

 

 

 

Wade McGillis 

 Peter Morley 

 Rodolfo Maldonado

 

Contact Us: hurricanelab-www@mit.edu