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IAP 2004 Subjects

Political Science

17.903
Community Service: Experience and Reflection
Adam Berinsky, Tobie Weiner
Tue Jan 6, 13, 20, 27, 01-02:30pm, E51-063

Pre-register on WebSIS and attend first class.
No listeners
Prereq:
Level: U 6 units Graded P/D/F Can be repeated for credit   

Seminar involves students in the community that exists beyond the labs and classrooms of the MIT campus. Through a combination of community service and academic study, students learn about political, economic, and social issues that confront residents in Boston and Cambridge. Students volunteer in a community service agency or private organization devoted to community needs and development. Students also responsible for directed readings, short writing assignments, and six seminar sessions. Subject can only be repeated for credit if area of community service is different. Contact: Tobie Weiner, E53-484, x3-3649, iguanatw@mit.edu

17.914
Special Topics in Political Science
The Anatomy of Empire: Investigation of US Policies Through the Declassified Documentary Record
Adam Berinsky, Aimee Smith, Laura Colon-Melendez
Mon-Fri, Jan 5-9, 12-16, 20-23, 26-30, 10am-12:00pm, 8-302

Pre-register on WebSIS and attend first class.
Listeners allowed, space permitting
Prereq:
Level: U 9 units Standard A - F Grading Can be repeated for credit   

Reading and discussion of special topics in the field of social science.
This class is an introduction to exploring the foreign and domestic policies of the US government through the study of declassified government documents. By combing through these documents we get a clearer picture of the motivations behind various policy decisions. This class consists of four two hour lectures per week on various topics relating to US imperialism, domestic repression and people's movements that resist these forces. Group projects will consist of a term paper based on primary research and a final oral presentation on the research.
Contact: Aimee Smith, alsmith@mit.edu

17.916
Special Topics in Political Science
Experiencing Health Policy: A Week in Washington, DC
Tobie Weiner, Adam Berinsky, Sandhya Sitaraman, Payal Garg
Sun Jan 25 thru Fri Jan 30, 08-05:00am, TBD

Selection by departmental lottery. Do not pre-register on WebSIS.
Enter lottery by: 05-Dec-2003
Limited to 20 participants.
No listeners
Prereq:
Level: U 6 units Graded P/D/F Can be repeated for credit   
Fee: 100.00 for Travel and accommodation expenses in DC

Reading and discussion of special topics in the field of social science.
Go to Washington, DC the fourth week of IAP to experience and learn about health policy. We'll visit health policy groups or federal agencies, such as the Department of Health & Human Services and the Institute of Medicine, and attend a relevant Congressional hearing. Events range from lectures to informal discussions. Students are required to be on campus by Tues, 1/20 for talks and discussions. For an application send email to sandhyas@mit.edu. Applications are due to sandhyas@mit.edu by midnight on December 5. The week of December 8 all will be notified via email whether or not they are in the program.
Contact: Sandhyas Sitaraman, sandhyas@mit.edu

17.917
Special Topics in Political Science
American Political Satire
Adam Berinsky, Sarah Sled
Tue, Thu, Jan 13, 15, 20, 22, 27, 29, 10am-12:00pm, 66-154

Pre-register on WebSIS and attend first class.
Limited to 40 participants.
Listeners allowed, space permitting
Prereq:
Level: U 3 units Graded P/D/F Can be repeated for credit   

Reading and discussion of special topics in the field of social science.
Political satire has long been a popular form of political communication in the US. This class begins with a discussion of what satire is, then traces its origins from cartoons appearing in early newspapers to the mainstream popularity of Mad Magazine to present day forms such as Saturday Night Live, The Daily Show, and The Onion. The main focus of the class will be analysis of examples from recent years, particularly the 2000 Presidential election. Readings will be drawn from the fields of political science, communications, media studies, sociology and psychology.
Contact: Sarah Sled, ssled@mit.edu

17.918
Special Topics in Political Science
Implementing the Cambridge Climate Action Plan
Stephen Meyer
Mon-Fri, Jan 5-8, 12, 14, 21, 23, 26-27, 29-30, 01-03:00pm, 4-261, 5, 6, 7, 8 meet 1-3:30

Pre-register on WebSIS and attend first class.
Limited to 15 participants.
No listeners
Prereq:
Level: U 6 units Graded P/D/F Can be repeated for credit   

Reading and discussion of special topics in the field of social science.
Students will work with Cambridge representatives, community members and environmental specialists at MIT to propose innovative strategies to reduce greenhouse gas emissions in the City of Cambridge. Students will learn how to employ community-based social marketing to encourage citizens to reduce their impact on climate change. Class sessions, readings and guest speakers will review major scientific and policy issues, model environmental initiatives, and unique ways that Cambridge affects climate change and may be affected in turn. Group project work will result in student presentations at the end of IAP of proposals to be considered for implementation in the City.
Contact: Amanda Graham, E40-479, x3-8995, agraham@mit.edu

17.919
Special Topics in Political Science
Imagining Terrorism: American Conceptions of Threat and Response
John Payne, Marc DeVore
Wed, Fri, Jan 14, 16, 21, 23, 28, 30, 10am-12:00pm, 66-154

Pre-register on WebSIS and attend first class.
No listeners
Prereq:
Level: U 3 units Graded P/D/F Can be repeated for credit   

Reading and discussion of special topics in the field of social science.
Before a state can develop a response to a potential threat, it must imagine it. This conception of threat then shapes the institutional responses. This class examines the American conceptions of terrorism and counter-terrorism, and the impact of these imaginational constructs on American foreign policy response. Course materials are drawn both from contemporary political science and related fields and from recent American fiction.
Contact: John Payne, jdpayne@mit.edu

17.920
Special Topics in Political Science
Martin Luther King Jr. Design Seminar
Tobie Weiner
Mon-Fri, Jan 5-9, 12-16, 20-23, 26-30, 03-05:00pm, E51-085

Pre-register on WebSIS and attend first class.
Limited to 30 participants.
Listeners allowed, space permitting
Prereq:
Level: U 12 units Standard A - F Grading Can be repeated for credit   

Reading and discussion of special topics in the field of social science.
Create and design an installation in Lobby 10 for MIT's annual Martin Luther King, Jr. celebration February 5, 2004. The first two weeks we'll discuss the ideas and goals of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., as well as themes surrounding all struggles against oppression and for equality, in order to create a design to connect people, in a figurative way, to such struggles. Students will work with faculty and staff in the MIT community as well as guest artists and lecturers from the Boston/Cambridge community to design the installation. The second two weeks of IAP we will break up into work groups and develop and construct the installation.
Web: http://web.mit.edu/polisci/www/syllabi/17.920s.pdf
Contact: Tobie Weiner, E53-484, x3-3649, iguanatw@mit.edu


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