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IAP 2005 Subjects

Earth, Atmospheric and Planetary Sciences

12.091
Special Topics in Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences
Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis for Trace Element Analysis of Geological, Biological and Environmental Materials
Ila Pillalamarri
Mon Jan 3, Wed Jan 5, Mon Jan 10, Wed Jan 12, 19, 10-12:00am, 54-313 First meeting, NW13-263

Selection by departmental lottery. Do not pre-register on WebSIS.
Enter lottery by: 23-Dec-2004
Listeners allowed, space permitting
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Level: U 2 units Graded P/D/F Can be repeated for credit   

Laboratory or field work in earth, atmospheric, and planetary sciences. To be arranged with department faculty. Consult with department Education Office.
For IAP 2005: Instrumental neutron activation analysis is a non-destructive analytical technique for the determination of elemental abundances at very low levels in a wide variety of samples, geological to biological. Get to know this technique which was used to analyze the lunar rock samples and is now widely used in environmental pollution studies. Everybody is welcome.This course is arranged in five sessions.
Web: http://web.mit.edu/pila/www/inaa.html
Contact: Ila Pillalamarri, NW13-263, x3-3387, pila@mit.edu

12.097
Special Topics in Atmospheric Science and Oceanography
Environmental Chemistry of Boston Harbor: A Field Investigation
Elizabeth Kujawinski
Mon-Sat, Jan 18-22, 24-28, 10am-05:00pm, Woods Hole, Falmouth,MA

Limited to 10 participants.
No listeners
Prereq: Permission of instructor 5.111 or strong background in chemistry
Level: U 6 units Graded P/D/F Can be repeated for credit   
Fee: 200.00 for Food and Lodging for 2 weeks at Woods Hole Oceanographic Ins

Laboratory or field work in atmospheric science and oceanography. To be arranged with department faculty. Consult with department Education Office.
For IAP, 2005: A field-based introduction to coastal chemical oceanography. Aqueous samples will be collected during a cruise in Boston Harbor. Students will learn the basic chemical measurements needed to describe a coastal system, including aqueous nutrients and other properties such as dissolved oxygen. The chemical parameters will be placed into context by the physical parameters such as salinity and temperature. The impact of anthropogenic activity will be assessed by the determination of caffeine concentrations (a tracer for wastewater) within the water column.
Web: http://eapsweb.mit.edu/events/abstract_7.html
Contact: Elizabeth Kujawinski, WHOI ms#25, (508) 289-3493, ekujawinski@whoi.edu

12.120
Environmental Earth Science Field Course
Sam Bowring, Tim Grove
Schedule: TBD
Selection by departmental lottery. Do not pre-register on WebSIS.
Enter lottery by: 03-Dec-2004
No listeners
Prereq: 12.001 or 12.102
Level: U 6 units Standard A - F Grading   
Fee: 200.00 for Travel, food, lodging

Introduction to the methods of geologic mapping; practical experience in aspects of environmental geology such as selecting sites for hazardous waste disposal, hazard assessment in seismically and volcanically active areas, and in understanding the three-dimensional character of dissected alluvial deposits. Subject offered according to demand.
Jan 3-12th. Students will fly from Boston to Las Vegas on January 3rd, returning Jan 12. Limited enrollment, early registration encouraged. Dates are tentative at this time. Please contact Prof. Bowring for current information. Any additional information will be posted on the EAPS website.
Web: http://eapsweb.mit.edu/events/abstract_1.html
Contact: Sam Bowring, 54-1124, x3-3775, sbowring@mit.edu

12.141
Electron Microprobe Analysis
Tim Grove, Dr.Nilanjan Chatterjee
Tue Jan 4, Thu Jan 6, Tue Jan 11, Thu Jan 13, 01-05:00pm, 54-1221

Selection by departmental lottery. Do not pre-register on WebSIS.
Enter lottery by: 03-Jan-2005
Limited to 8 participants.
No listeners
Prereq:
Level: U 6 units Graded P/D/F   

Introduction to the theory of x-ray microanalysis through the electron microprobe including ZAF matrix corrections. Techniques to be discussed are wavelength and energy dispersive spectrometry, scanning backscattered electron, secondary electron, cathodoluminescence, and X-ray imaging. Lab sessions involve hands-on use of the electron microprobe.
Offered for undergraduate credit, but persons interested in an in-depth discussion of quantitative x-ray analysis are invited to participate. Students will be required to complete lab exercises to obtain credit. Find required reading at URL.
Web: http://web.mit.edu/e-probe/www/iap.html
Contact: Dr. Nilanjan Chatterjee, 54-1216, x3-1995, e-probe-www@mit.edu

12.221
Field Geophysics
Tom Herring, Brad Hager
Sun-Sat, Jan 3-15, 18-21, 24-28, ??-??:00am, Field work:Jan 6-15

Selection by departmental lottery. Do not pre-register on WebSIS.
Enter lottery by: 06-Dec-2004
Limited to 10 participants.
No listeners
Prereq:
Level: U 6 units Graded P/D/F   
Fee: 200.00 for Travel

Practical methods of modern geophysics including the Global Positioning System (GPS), gravity, and magnetics. Field work is conducted in western US and includes intensive 10-day field exercise. Focus is on measurement techniques and their interpretation. Introduction to the science of gravity, magnetics, and the GPS. Measure of crustal structure, fault motions, tectonic deformations, and the local gravity and magnetic fields. Students perform high-precision measurements and participate in data analysis. Emphasis on the principles of geophysical data collection and the relevance of these data for tectonic faulting, crustal structure, and the dynamics of the earthquake cycle.
For meeting and schedule info check course website before Dec 6.
Web: http://eapsweb.mit.edu/events/abstract_3.html
Contact: Thomas A. Herring, 54-618, x3-5941, tah@mit.edu

12.310
An Introduction to Weather Forecasting
Lodovica Illari
Mon, Wed, Fri, Jan 12, 14, 19, 21, 24, 26, 28, 01:30-03:00pm, 54-915

Pre-register on WebSIS and attend first class.
Limited to 50 participants.
Listeners allowed, space permitting
Prereq: 8.01, 18.01
Level: U 6 units Graded P/D/F   

Basic principles of synoptic meteorology and weather forecasting. Analysis of hourly weather data and numerical weather prediction models. Regular preparation of weather forecasts.
Guest lecture by local TV meteorologist.
Web: http://www-paoc.mit.edu/synoptic/courses/12.310/12310.htm
Contact: Lodovica Illari, 54-1612, x3-2286, illari@squall.mit.edu

12.411
Astronomy Field Camp
James Elliot
Schedule: TBD
Selection by departmental lottery. Do not pre-register on WebSIS.
Enter lottery by: 15-Oct-2004
Limited to 6 participants.
No listeners
Prereq: 12.410J or 8.287J
Level: U 9 units Graded P/D/F Can be repeated for credit   
Fee: 200.00 for partial cost of transportation, food, and lodging

Individual research projects in observational astronomy involving supervised work at Lowell Observatory (located in Flagstaff, AZ). Written and oral reports required. Enrollment limited to 6.
Applications (due 10/15) may be obtained from contacts listed below. Because of the early deadline each year, please plan ahead.
Contact: Allison Cocuzzo, 3-9317, cocuzzo@mit.edu or Jim Elliot, 54-422, x3-6308, jle@mit.edu

12.771
Seminar in Chemical Oceanography at MIT
Seminar on the Interpretation of the Record of Abrupt Climate Change
Julian Sachs, Carl Wunsch
Wed Jan 12, 19, 26, 02-04:00pm, 54-313

Pre-register on WebSIS and attend first class.
Listeners allowed, space permitting
Prereq: Permission of instructor
Level: H 3 units Graded P/D/F Can be repeated for credit   

Topics in chemical oceanography taught at MIT. Content varies from term to term. 12.770 is letter-graded.
Paleoclimate records spanning the last 150,000 years from around the globe indicate that Earth's climate underwent large, repeated shifts in decades or centuries. We will meet four times during IAP to explore the evidence for these fluctuations and what they imply for the climate system. Depending upon interest, we may continue the seminar in the spring term on a weekly basis. The reading list is located on the seminar webpage. Please read the 2 indicated review articles before the 1st meeting. In meetings 2-4 we will seek volunteers to help lead the discussions. We look forward to some lively discussions!
Web: http://eapsweb.mit.edu/events/abstract_6.html
Contact: Julian Sachs, E34-254, x3-0474, jsachs@mit.edu

12.950
Seminar in Physical Oceanography at MIT
Parallel Programming Using MPI
Constantinos Evangelinos
Mon Jan 24 thru Fri Jan 28, 10am-12:00pm, 54-317

Pre-register on WebSIS and attend first class.
Limited to 30 participants.
Listeners allowed, space permitting
Prereq: Good programming skills in C/C++ or Fortran
Level: H 2 units Standard A - F Grading Can be repeated for credit   

Message Passing Interface is a highly successful, universal API standard for distributed memory parallel programming. Used in applications scaling to thousands of processors, MPI may appear daunting. This course will cover basic principles of message passing, move on to MPI environment functions, and continue with blocking and non-blocking point-to-pointcommunications. After producing MPI routines to write functional parallel programs, we will proceed to cover the more elaborate topics of collective communications, derived datatypes, process topologies, and groups, contexts and communicators. We will also discuss MPI language binding issues, cover the profiling interface, and explain the MPI runtime. MPI-2 issues will be covered briefly.
Contact: Constantinos Evangelinos, 54-1518, x3-5259, ce107@MIT.EDU


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Last update: 30 September 2004