IAP Independent Activities Period by, for, and about
	the MIT community
overview participate organize offerings calendar  

Help | Advanced Search

IAP 2005 Subjects

Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

6.090
Spec Subj: EE & CS
Building Programming Experience: A Lead-In to 6.001
Benjamin Vandiver
Mon-Fri, Jan 10-14, 18-21, 10am-01:00pm, 32-144

Selection by departmental lottery. Do not pre-register on WebSIS.
Enter lottery by: 15-Dec-2004
Limited to 30 participants.
No listeners
Prereq: should have no significant programming experience
Level: U 6 units Graded P/D/F Can be repeated for credit   

This course will serve as an aggressively gentle introduction to programming for those students who lack background in the field. Specifically targeted at students with little or no programming experience, the course seeks to reach students who intend to take 6.001 in the Spring Term and feel they would struggle because they lack the necessary background. The main focus of the subject will be acquiring programming experience: instruction in programming fundamentals coupled with lots of practice problems. Lots of programming required, but lots of support provided.

Go to website to apply for lottery.
Web: http://web.mit.edu/benmv/6.001/www/bpe/
Contact: Benjamin Vandiver, benmv@mit.edu

6.091
Spec Subj: EE & CS
Introduction to Digital Electronics
Jim Bales, Chris Wilkson
Mon, Wed, Fri, Jan 3, 5, 7, 10, 12, 14, 19, 21, 26, 28, 01-04:00pm, 4-402

Pre-register on WebSIS and attend first class.
Limited to 12 participants.
No listeners
Prereq: Note: This is same subject as 6.S28
Level: U 6 units Graded P/D/F Can be repeated for credit   

Fun, hands-on introduction for those students with no prior experience with digital electronics. Great for freshmen!


Learn to design your own circuits for times when off-the-shelf solutions are not available. Begin by assembling a utility board, then digital logic gates, flip-flops, and counters.

Each session has a one-hour lecture teaching new concepts and a two-hour lab period. Several design projects in which you can try your own ideas. The course ends with a team based design competition with prizes awarded for the best designs. Note: if the class is oversubscribed, a lottery will be run at the first session.
Contact: Amy Fitzgerald, amyfitz@mit.edu

6.092
Spec Subj: EE & CS
Bioinformatics & Proteomics: An Engineering-Based Problemsolving Approach
Gil Alterovitz, Manolis Kellis
Tue, Thu, Jan 4, 6, 11, 13, 18, 20, 25, 27, 11am-12:30pm, 3-133., LAB: TR 9-11 am, 37-212

Pre-register on WebSIS and attend first class.
No listeners
Prereq: 7.012 or equivalent; 6.003 or equivalent; 6.041 or equivalen
Level: U 3 units Graded P/D/F Can be repeated for credit   

Interdisciplinary and hands-on approach the topics of bioinformatics and proteomics. Lectures and labs cover sequence analysis, microarray expression analysis, Bayesian methods, control theory, scale-free networks, and biotechnology applications. Designed for those with a computational or engineering background, it will include current real-world examples, actual implementations, and engineering design issues. Where applicable, engineering issues from signal processing, network theory, machine learning, robotics and other domains. New research areas explored using current literature and book chapter materials written by instructors. Guest lecturers from industry and academia. Joint with HST.

LAB:
Tuesday/Thursday, January 4-27
9am-11am, room 37-312
Contact: Gil Alterovitz, gil@mit.edu

6.093
Spec Subj: EE & CS
High-Tech Startups
Jack M. Gill, PhD., Vanguard Venture Partners
Tue-Thu, Jan 11-13, 18-20, 25-27, 10am-12:00pm, 32-155, 1/13, 1/27 in E51-335

Selection by departmental lottery. Do not pre-register on WebSIS.
Enter lottery by: 15-Dec-2004
Limited to 60 participants.
Listeners allowed, space permitting
Prereq:
Level: U 3 units Graded P/D/F Can be repeated for credit   

A pragmatic, fast-paced primer course on the dynamics of high-tech entrepreneurship designed for science and entrepreneurial faculty, graduate students in science, engineering, medicine, and entrepreneurship, upper-class science, engineering and entrepreneurial majors, and post-docs and interns with entrpreneurial interests. Features prestigious, industry guest speakers. Topics: VCs, Entrepreneurs, VC Firms, Startup Company Dynamics, stock options, compensations, financings, cap schemes, photonics case study, telecom case study, and high-tech career planning.
Contact: Kathy Sullivan, kaths@mit.edu

6.185
Special Laboratory Subjects in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
"6.270 Autonomous Robot Design Competition"
6.270 Organizers
Mon Jan 3, Wed Jan 5, Fri Jan 7, 10-12:00am, 34-101

Selection by departmental lottery. Do not pre-register on WebSIS.
Enter lottery by: 25-Oct-2004
Limited to 180 participants.
No listeners
Prereq:
Level: U 6 units Graded P/D/F Can be repeated for credit   
Fee: 150.00 for to reserve place and cover cost of kit

Groups of two or three design, build, and program robots (made of LEGO and various sensors) for the annual final contest at the end of IAP. This student-taught class is open only to MIT students; freshmen are strongly encouraged to participate. No experience is necessary; you'll learn how to play with LEGO, basic programming and soldering. A lottery is held in mid-October because this class is very popular. It's time (and fun) intensive, running from the start of IAP, at ludicrous speed to the exciting public final competition at the end. Participants can't have other major time commitments. Please see our website, http://web.mit.edu/6.270/. (Class has 6 EDPs.)
Web: http://web.mit.edu/6.270/www/
Contact: 6.270 Organizers, 6.270-organizers@mit.edu

6.186
Special Laboratory Subjects in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
MASLab - Mobile Autonomous Systems Laboratory
Prof. Leslie Kaelbling, Finale Doshi
Fri Jan 28, 05-08:30pm, 26-100, Final Competition

Selection by departmental lottery. Do not pre-register on WebSIS.
Enter lottery by: 29-Oct-2004
Limited to 60 participants.
No listeners
Prereq: Programming Experience
Level: U 6 units Graded P/D/F Can be repeated for credit   
Fee: 200.00 for team fee to defray the cost of materials

MASLab/6.186 is a student-run activity in which students build autonomous robots that navigate an unknown playing field, locating and retrieving items of interest. While similar in structure to 6.270, 6.186 has a more challenging contest and uses more sophisticated components. The final competition
will start with an Open House at 5 and contests at 5:30. 6 EDPs.
Web: http://maslab.lcs.mit.edu
Contact: Finale Doshi, finale@mit.edu

6.187
Special Laboratory Subjects in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
6.370: The ACM/IEEE Robocraft Programming Contest
Michael Ernst, Aaron Iba, David Greenspan
Sat Jan 29, 06-10:00pm, 10-250, Final Competition

Pre-register on WebSIS and attend first class.
Listeners allowed, space permitting
Prereq: Programming Experience
Level: U 6 units Graded P/D/F Can be repeated for credit   

6.370 is the MIT ACM/IEEE Chapter's annual programming contest. Students will work in teams of 1-3, programming robots to play Robocraft, a real-time strategy game similar to WarCraft. The competition will culminate in a live Robocraft tournament held publicly on Jan. 29. The top teams will receive cash prizes. 6 Engineering Design Points. Students must preregister both on WEBSIS, for 6.187, AND on the 6.370 website by December 31st. Only mandatory on-campus event is the final competition.
Web: http://web.mit.edu/6.370
Contact: David Greenspan, 6.370@mit.edu


MIT  
Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Home | Overview | Participate | Organize | Offerings | Calendar | Search
Comments and questions to: iap-www@mit.edu Academic Resource Center, Room 7-104, 617-253-1668
Last update: 30 September 2004